logo



What the Bible says about the Trinity

John 1:1-2   In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. (NKJ)

     The text acknowledges that “the Word” is Jesus Christ, that in the beginning Jesus Christ was with God and He was God. According to the literal text, it seems to make no sense that the Word was God or that God was with God. But the Scripture, including John 1:1-2, is God’s word and flawless. It is obvious that the apostle John speaks of two Gods since the text says that the Word was God and the Word was with God.  

John 1:18   No one has seen God at any time. The only begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He has declared Him. (NKJ)
John 3:16   For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. (NKJ)

     In this text “the Son” signifies God the Son; “the Father” signifies God the Father. “God” in John 1:1-2 and 3:16 signify God the Father. John 1:1-2,18 and 3:16 record the distinction of the Son from the Father. John 1:1-2 says that God the Son is God, and God the Father is God. God the Son is a Person. God the Father is a Person. It can be found that there are two Gods and there are two divine Persons. It can be concluded that there are two separate Gods and two separate Persons. This is what the Scripture says.

Luke 3:21-22 when all the people were baptized, it came to pass that Jesus also was baptized; and while He prayed, the heaven was opened. And the Holy Spirit descended in bodily form like a dove upon Him, and a voice came from heaven which said, “You are My beloved Son; in You I am well pleased.” (NKJ)
Acts 5:3-4   but Peter said, “Ananias, why has Satan filled your heart to lie to the Holy Spirit and keep back part of the price of the land for yourself? While it remained, was it not your own? And after it was sold, was it not in your own control? Why have you conceived this thing in your heart? You have not lied to men but to God.” (NKJ)

     In Acts 5:3-4 the Holy Spirit is called God. It is obvious that the Holy Spirit is a living Being. Further, John 1:1-2,18 say that Jesus is God, and the Father is also God. It can be said that Jesus is a living Being and the Father is also a living Being. Luke 3:21-22 states that when Jesus was baptized, the Holy Spirit descended on Him, and God the Father spoke to Jesus saying, “You are My beloved Son.” These passages obviously indicate that there are three separate Gods. The Scripture affirms that Jesus is a divine Person and a living Being, that God the Father is a divine Person and a living Being, and the Holy Spirit is also a divine Person and a living Being. The Father is God, the Son is God and the Holy Spirit is God. Therefore, it can be obviously concluded that there are three separate Persons, three separate living Beings, and three separate Gods.


The Bible affirms that there are three separate Gods and Persons.
John 14:15-17 If you love me, you will obey what I command. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Counselor to be with you forever-the Spirit of truth. (NIV)
John 16:7-8  But I tell you the truth: It is for your good that I am going away. Unless I go away, the Counselor will not come to you; but if I go, I will send him to you. When he comes, he will convict the world of guilt in regard to sin. (NIV)

     Jesus spoke of the Father and the Spirit as distinct from Himself. The texts indicate that there is God the Son, God the Father, and God the Spirit. That is, it can be found that there are three separate Gods and three separate Persons.

Luke 23:46  and when Jesus had cried out with a loud voice, He said, “Father, into Your hands I commit My spirit.” Having said this, He breathed His last. (NKJ)

     This passage indicates the distinction of the Father from the Son. Here, it can be found that there are two separate Gods since Jesus is God and the Father is God.

1 Pet. 3:18  For Christ also suffered once for sins, the just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive by the Spirit. (NKJ)

     In Luke 23:46, Jesus prayed to the Father. I Peter 3:18 affirms that Christ was made alive by the Spirit after death so that Christ is not the Spirit. Obviously all passages cited show that the Son is a Being distinct from God the Father and the Holy Spirit; that the Son is God; that the Father is God; and that the Holy Spirit is God. Then there are three separate Gods, three separate Persons and three living Beings.

The Bible affirms that there are three Spirits but one Spirit.

John 6:63 τὸ πνεῦμά ἐστιν τὸ ζῳοποιοῦν, ἡ σὰρξ οὐκ ὠφελεῖ οὐδέν· τὰ ῥήματα ἃ ἐγὼ λελάληκα ὑμῖν πνεῦμά ἐστιν καὶ ζωή ἐστιν.(BNT)
KJV    It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life.
NKJ    It is the Spirit who gives life; the flesh profits nothing. The words that I speak to you are spirit, and they are life.
NIV    The Spirit gives life; the flesh counts for nothing. The words I have spoken to you are spirit and they are life.
NRS   It is the spirit that gives life; the flesh is useless. The words that I have spoken to you are spirit and life.
NAS   It is the Spirit who gives life; the flesh profits nothing; the words that I have spoken to you are spirit and are life.
NLT   It is the Spirit who gives eternal life. Human effort accomplishes nothing. And the very words I have spoken to you are spirit and life.
 
     To pneuma estin to zoopoioun (τὸ πνεῦμά ἐστιν τὸ ζῳοποιοῦν) can be translated, “It is the Spirit who gives life.” Ta rhemata…pneuma estin kai zoe estin (τὰ ῥήματα...πνεῦμά ἐστιν καὶ ζωή ἐστιν) can be translated, “The words...is (are) spirit and is (are) life.” Pneuma (πνεῦμά) is anarthrous, but it should be translated as “the Spirit” since pneuma (πνεῦμά) is here the same as to pneuma (πνεῦμά) which is translated as “the Spirit.”   
 
John 1:1-2 Ἐν ἀρχῇ ἦν ὁ λόγος, καὶ ὁ λόγος ἦν πρὸς τὸν θεόν, καὶ θεὸς ἦν ὁ λόγος. οὗτος ἦν ἐν ἀρχῇ πρὸς τὸν θεόν.(BNT) 
NKJ    In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God.

     Ho logos (ὁ λόγος) in John 1:1,2 is the Word which means God, that is, Jesus Christ. Ta rhemata (τὰ ῥήματα) in John 6:63 is “the words” and “the Spirit.” The Scripture affirms that ho logos (ὁ λόγος) is God, that is, Jesus Christ and also ta rhemata (τὰ ῥήματα) is “the Spirit.” It should be ho logos estin ta rhemata (ὁ λόγος ἐστιν τὰ ῥήματα). In both Greek and English grammar the construction of John’s Gospel seems to be unreasonable, but since the Scripture expresses it in this manner it must be accepted as truth.   

1 Cor 15:45 οὕτως καὶ γέγραπται· ἐγένετο ὁ πρῶτος ἄνθρωπος Ἀδὰμ εἰς ψυχὴν ζῶσαν, ὁ ἔσχατος Ἀδὰμ εἰς πνεῦμα ζῳοποιοῦν. (BNT)
NKJ    And so it is written, “The first man Adam became a living being.” The last Adam became a life-giving spirit.
NIV    So it is written: “The first man Adam became a living being”; the last Adam, a life-giving spirit.
KJV    And so it is written, the first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit.
NAS    So also it is written, “The first man, Adam, became a living soul.” The last Adam became a life-giving spirit.   
NLT    The Scriptures tell us, “The first man, Adam, became a living person.”...the last Adam–that is, Christ–is a life-giving Spirit.

     All of these translations are mistranslations. The NLT translated ho eschatos Adam eis pneuma zoopoioun (ὁ ἔσχατος Ἀδὰμ εἰς πνεῦμα ζῳοποιοῦν) as the last Adam -that is, Christ-is a life-giving Spirit. To pneuma estin to zoopoioun (τὸ πνεῦμά ἐστιν τὸ ζῳοποιοῦν) in John 6:63 is the same as pneuma zoopoioun (πνεῦμα ζῳοποιοῦν) in 1 Cor. 15:45. The NKJ correctly translates John 6:63, “It is the Spirit who gives life.” This can be transformed into “the life-giving Spirit,” for it means that the Spirit is the life-giving Spirit.
     Pneuma (πνεῦμά) is anarthrous and singular. Also zoopoioun (ζῳοποιοῦν) is used here in a singular construction. But it must not be “a life-giving Spirit” or “a life-giving spirit” but “the life-giving Spirit” since a Spirit or a spirit does not mean the Spirit. The Spirit means the Holy Spirit. The last Adam in 1 Cor. 15:45 means Christ. Therefore, it can be inferred that Christ is the life-giving Spirit. John  6:63 and 1 Cor. 15:45 obviously also affirm that Christ is the Spirit. John 4:24 cited above states that God, that is, God the Father, is the Spirit. 1 Cor. 15:45 and 2 Cor. 3:17 state that Christ is the Spirit. The Scripture obviously affirms that Christ is the Spirit and God the Father is the Spirit. Through these passages cited above it can be concluded that there are three Spirits.

Eph. 4:4-6  There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called in one hope of your calling; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is above all, and.....in you all. (NKJ)

     This text speaks of only one Spirit, but the passages cited above record three Spirits. In the Bible there is great complexity and confusion on the doctrine of the Holy Spirit. But these Bible verses must be accepted as the truth.

The OT states that Jesus Christ is the Son and He also is the Father.

Is. 9:6  For unto us a Child is born, Unto us a Son is given; And the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of  Peace. (NKJ)

     A Son was to be born. What was his name? Mighty God and Everlasting Father. Here, “a Son” speaks of the Christ, the Son of God the Father. The text also states here that a Son is Christ, Christ is mighty God, and Christ is the everlasting Father. Though this account may seem to be contradictory or even ridiculous, it must be accepted as a true word of God written by His prophet Isaiah. Also this same truth can be found in the NT taught by Christ Himself.
 

Jesus Himself says that He is not the Father and He also is the Father.  

John 14:28,31 You have heard Me say to you, I am going away and coming back to you. If you loved Me, you would rejoice because I said, I am going to the Father, for My Father is greater than I. But that the world may know that I love the Father, and as the Father gave Me commandment, so I do. Arise, let us go from here. (NKJ)

     His testimony (“I am going to the Father. My Father is greater than I. I love the Father. The Father gave Me commandment...”) proved that God the Son is distinct from God the Father. There are two separate Gods.

John 5:17-18 But Jesus answered them, “My Father has been working until now, and I have been working.” Therefore the Jews sought all the more to kill Him, because He not only broke the Sabbath, but also said that God was His Father, making Himself equal with God. (NKJ)
 
     Jesus said that God is His Father. Therefore, it can be concluded that Jesus is not the Father. If the following passages are carefully examined, it will obviously show that Jesus is not the Father but He also is the Father.  

John 14:6-11  Jesus said to him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me. If you had known Me, you would have known My Father also; and from now on you know Him and have seen Him.” Philip said to Him, “Lord, show us the Father, and it is sufficient for us.” Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you so long, and yet you have not known Me, Philip? He who has seen Me has seen the Father; so how can you say, ‘Show us the Father’? Do you not believe that I am in the Father, and the Father in Me? The words that I speak to you I do not speak on My own authority; but the Father who dwells in Me does the works. Believe Me that I am in the Father and the Father in Me, or else believe Me for the sake of the works themselves.” (NKJ)

     Jesus’ word (“No one comes to the Father except through me”) affirms that Jesus is not the Father. The phrases “show us the Father” and “He who has seen Me has seen the Father” mean that to see the Father is to see Jesus, or to see Jesus is to see the Father. Thus, it can be concluded that Jesus is the Father. Isaiah 9:6, John 5:17-18, John 14:6-11 record that the Son is not the Father and the Son is also the Father. These  seem to be untrue and unreasonable records but it is biblical truth. The Bible says so.   

Col. 1:15  He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. (NKJ)

     Jesus is the visible image of the invisible God. Also He is the visible God. This is a great mystery to non-Christians, but to believers in the Scripture as the word of God, it is neither a mystery nor a contradiction since the Bible says so.  

The following passages show that two Gods [the Father and the Son] are one.

John 10:30   I and My Father are one. (NKJ)
John 10:38   but if I do, though you do not believe Me, believe the works, that you may know and believe that the Father is in Me, and I in Him.
John 14:20   at that day you will know that I am in My Father, and you in Me, and I in you. (NKJ)

     How can “Jesus and the Father be one”? The two are one God since Jesus is in the Father and the Father is in Jesus. Then it can be concluded that two Gods are one God. These texts indeed prove that there are two Gods but one God, and one God but two Gods. In John 4:24 Jesus says, “God [God the Father] is the Spirit.” In 2 Cor. 3:17 the apostle Paul says, “The Lord is the Spirit.” Therefore, it can be concluded that there are three Gods but one God. This kind of explanation makes no sense outside the Bible. But it is indeed true because the Bible says so.

The following passages show that there are three but these three are one.

1 John 5:7-8  For there are three that bear witness in heaven: the Father, the Word, and the Holy Spirit; and these three are one. And there are three that bear witness on earth: the Spirit, the water, and the blood; and these three agree as one. (NKJ)
NIV   For there are three that testify: the Spirit, the water and the blood; three are in agreement.  

     The NIV footnotes “Late manuscripts of the Vulgate testify in heaven: the Father, the Word and the Holy Spirit, and these three are one.” The text indeed affirms that there are three and these three are one. The phrase “these three agree as one” means that there are three Gods and these three Gods are one. It can be concluded that there are three Gods but one God, and one God but three Gods. This explanation seems to be a paradox and contradiction outside the Bible, but it is perfectly true because the Bible says so.

Eph. 4:4-6  There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called in one hope of your calling; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all. (NKJ)
2 Cor. 3:17  Now the Lord is the Spirit; and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. (NKJ)

     Eph. 4:4-6 speaks of one Spirit and one Lord and one God. 2  Cor. 3:17 affirms that the Lord signifies Christ. If the Lord is the Spirit, then Christ is the Spirit. The passages cited above indicate that Christ is not the Spirit, but the text obviously affirms that Christ is the Spirit.

Rom. 8:9-11   You, however, are controlled not by the sinful nature but by the Spirit, if the Spirit of God lives in you. And if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, he does not belong to Christ. But if Christ is in you, your body is dead because of sin, yet your spirit is alive because of righteousness. And if the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead is living in you, he who raised Christ from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies through his Spirit, who lives in you. (NKJ)

     Note these phrases: “‘The Spirit of God lives in you.’ ‘The Spirit of Christ…Christ is in you.’ ‘The Spirit of Him is in you.’ ‘His Spirit who lives in you.’” “The Spirit is in you” is indeed used of the same as “Christ is in you.” Consequently, it affirms that Christ is the Spirit. 2 Cor. 3:17 cited above indicates that the Lord is the Spirit; that is, Christ is the Spirit. Hence, 2 Cor. 3:17 is the same as Rom. 8:9-11 in meaning. Many passages confirm that Christ is the Holy Spirit.

John 4:23-24  But the hour is coming, and now is, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth; for the Father is seeking such to worship Him. God is Spirit, and those who worship Him must worship in spirit and truth. (NKJ)

     The text in the NKJ is from the mistranslation of the Greek text, as we have already noted above. It should be, “But the hour is coming, and now is, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in the truth; for the Father is seeking such to worship Him. God is the Spirit, and those who worship Him must worship in the Spirit and in the truth” (Author). Jesus stated that God is called the Father, that is, God the Father. In John 4:23-24, Jesus affirmed that God the Father is the Spirit.
     Acts 5:3-4 cited above states that the Holy Spirit is God. All Scripture affirms that God is the Holy Spirit, that God the Father is the Holy Spirit, and that Jesus is the Holy Spirit. The passages cited above state that Christ is not the Holy Spirit. Instead, 2 Cor. 3:17 states that Christ is the Holy Spirit. This explanation seems to be illogical and contradictory outside the Bible, but it is obviously true because the Bible says so.

The Scripture states that there are three Lords but one Lord.

I Cor. 12:3     Therefore I make known to you that no one speaking by the Spirit of God calls Jesus accursed, and no one can say that Jesus is Lord except by the Holy Spirit. (NKJ)
2 Cor. 3:17     Now the Lord is the Spirit; and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. (NKJ)
Luke 1:68       Blessed be the Lord God of Israel. (KJV)
Rom. 10:9      If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus, (NKJ)
Eph. 4:4-6      There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called in one hope of your calling; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is above all, and.....in you all. (NKJ)

     The texts state the following: “‘Jesus is the Lord.’ ‘The Spirit is the Lord.’ ‘The Father is the Lord.’” Hence, it can be found that there are three Lords, but Eph. 4:4-6 states that there is one Lord. Thus, the texts cited seem to make no sense and are confusing in their constructions. Since these texts are the flawless words of God, it can be concluded that the Bible affirms there are three Lords and one Lord.
    It should be inferred that these three are one, that is, these three agree as one. Biblically and theologically, it should be expressed that “there are three Lords but also there is one Lord. There is one Lord but also there are three Lords.” Through these studies, the general rule of the doctrine of the Trinity is obviously found that Christ is not the Holy Spirit and He is also the Holy Spirit. The Son is not the Father and He is also the Father. The Son is God, the Father is God, and the Holy Spirit is God. It seems to be illogical and contradictory outside the Bible, but it is indeed true because the Bible says so.     
    

The Hebrew text affirms that God is plural and also singular.

Gen 1:1  ἐν ἀρχῇ ἐποίησεν ὁ θεὸς τὸν οὐρανὸν καὶ τὴν γῆν (LXT)
NKJ    In the beginning God (Elohim-ὁ θεὸς) created the heavens and the earth.
Gen. 1:26  Then God (Elohim-ὁ θεὸς) said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness.” (NKJ)

     The LXX Septuaginta Ralfs translates the Hebrew plural Elohim as the Greek singular ho theos (ὁ θεὸς). Every English version translates the plural Elohim as the singular “God.” Genesis 1:26 indeed affirms that God Elohim is used of the meaning of the plural “Us” and “Our” so there are the plural Gods.

Gen 2:4  αὕτη ἡ βίβλος γενέσεως οὐρανοῦ καὶ γῆς ὅτε ἐγένετο ᾗ ἡμέρᾳ ἐποίησεν ὁ θεὸς τὸν οὐρανὸν καὶ τὴν γῆν (LXT)
NKJ    This is the history of the heavens and the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens.

     Some insist that the meaning Elohim (God) in Genesis 1:1 is different from that of yhwh [the Lord God] in Genesis 2:4. However, both words have the same meaning. Since both passages record that Elohim created the heavens and the earth, and yhwh made (created) the earth and the heavens, both have the same meaning.

Gen. 11:6-7   And the Lord [yhwh (Adonai)] said, “Indeed the people are one and they all have one language, and this is what they begin to do; now nothing that they propose to do will be withheld from them. Come, let Us go down and there confuse their language, that they may not understand one another's speech.” (NKJ)

     The Hebrew plural Elohim in Genesis 1:1 is transformed into the Hebrew yhwh of Genesis 11:6-7. These Hebrew words have the same meaning. In Genesis 1:26 Elohim is used of the plural “Us.” In Genesis 11:6-7 the singular yhwh is used of the plural “Us.” The Genesis text indeed proves that there is not one God but plural Gods. These literal descriptions on the Trinity must be accepted as the word of God since it is written in literal language.  

The NT affirms that God is singular and also plural.

John 3:8-11  The wind blows where it wishes, and you hear the sound of it, but cannot tell where it comes from and where it goes. So is everyone who is born of the Spirit. Nicodemus answered and said to Him, How can these things be? Jesus answered and said to him, Are you the teacher of Israel, and do not know these things? Most assuredly, I say to you, We speak what We know and testify what We have seen, and you do not receive Our witness. (NKJ)
John 14:16-17  And I will pray the Father, and He will give you another Helper, that He may abide with you forever, even the Spirit of truth, (NKJ)
John 14:23,26  Jesus answered and said to him, “If anyone loves Me, he will keep My word; and My Father will love him, and We will come to him and make Our home with him. But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all things that I said to you.” (NKJ)

     In these texts we find “Jesus, the Father and the Spirit, that is, three Gods.” Jesus said these three Gods are called the plural “We” and “Our.” The NT then proves that God is singular and also plural.   

The NT explains the meaning of “Our home” spoken by Jesus.

1 Cor. 3:16-17 Do you not know that you are the temple of God and that the Spirit of God dwells in you? If anyone defiles the temple of God, God will destroy him. For the temple of God is holy, which temple you are. (NKJ)
2 Cor. 13:5   Examine yourselves as to whether you are in the faith. Test yourselves. Do you not know yourselves, that Jesus Christ is in you? unless indeed you are disqualified. (NKJ)
1 John 4:15-16  Whoever confesses that Jesus is the Son of God, God abides in him, and he in God. (NKJ)

     These texts indeed confirm that God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit, (that is, three Gods) are/abide in a Christian. In John 3:8-11 and 14:23,26, Jesus speaks of “Our home.” Using these texts, it can be concluded that there are three Gods but one God, and there is one God but three Gods.

The Scripture proves that God exists as trinity, and three Gods are co-workers.

Luke 3:21-22  When all the people were being baptized, Jesus was baptized too. And as he was praying, heaven was opened and the Holy Spirit descended on him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven: “You are my Son, whom I love; with you I am well pleased.” (NIV)

     God the Holy Spirit sent by God the Father came on God the Son. To insist there is only one God, makes it impossible to interpret these passages. The text obviously confirms that there are three separate Gods, co-workers together.

Luke 4:1  Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led by the Spirit in the desert. (NIV)

     Jesus who is God the Son was led by God the Spirit who was sent by God the Father. To insist the there is only one God, makes it impossible to interpret this passage. Luke 4:1 also confirms that there are three separate Gods, co-workers together.

Luke 4:14  Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news about him spread through the whole countryside. (NIV)

     Jesus returned to Galilee to preach the gospel by the power of the Spirit sent by God the Father. The text also confirms that there are three separate Gods, co-workers together.

Luke 4:18-19  The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to release the oppressed.....the year of the Lord’s favor. (NIV)
Acts 10:38   How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and power, and how he went around doing good and healing all who were under the power of the devil...God was with him. (NIV)

     Both texts indicate that Jesus was anointed to preach the gospel with power through the Holy Spirit sent by God the Father. It is impossible to insist from these passages that there is only one God. The text also confirms that there are three separate Gods, co-workers together. These three Gods are distinct from each other but co-workers together.

Titus 3:5-6  He saved us, not because of righteous things we had done, but because of his mercy. He saved us through the washing of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior. (NIV)

    The text states that “…by the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior.” The word “whom” is a mistranslation. It must be “of whom.” This suggests that “the gift” in Acts 10:45 is omitted in Titus 3:6. The text must be “…by the Holy Spirit, of whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior.” This means that God poured out the gift of the Holy Spirit on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior. The fact obviously indicates the co-working of three Gods. It is impossible to conclude from these passages that there is only one God. These texts also clearly prove that three Gods are distinct from each other but co-workers together.

The doctrine of the Trinity written in the Scripture is a paradox outside the Scripture.

     All Scripture in the OT and NT obviously records, “God the Father is not God the Son. God the Son is not God the Father. God the Son is not God the Holy Spirit. God the Holy Spirit is not God the Father.” The Bible confirms that there are three separate Gods. They are indeed distinct from each other. We learn this also: God the Father = God the Son = God the Holy Spirit. So the Trinity of the OT and NT must be expressed, “There are three Gods but one God. There is one God but three Gods. There are three Persons but one Person. There is one Person but three Persons. Three Persons are three Gods. Three Gods are one God. One God is three Gods.” This doctrine of the Trinity seems to be obvious nonsense. It is a paradox outside Christian faith, but it is the truth of the Scripture. If this interpretation of the Trinity is rejected, it is impossible to interpret or understand the Scripture from Genesis to Revelation.

The doctrine of the Trinity is by no means a paradox within the Scripture.

Gen. 2:7  The Lord God formed the man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being. (NIV)

     The invisible God created the visible man from the dust of the ground. Can any human being prove this fact as truth by his own thought, idea or language? Or can any human being prove this in a laboratory? No. It is perfectly impossible to prove. Though the Genesis account makes no sense to those who are outside Christ, it remains biblical truth unique to the Scripture. Without a single exception, every real Christian accepts the literal record in Genesis 2:7 as a genuine revelation of the word of God.

Ex. 14:15-16  Then the Lord said to Moses, “Why are you crying out to me? Tell the Israelites to move on. Raise your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea to divide the water so that the Israelites can go through the sea on dry ground.” (NIV)
 
     Can this historical account be proven as true? The story is incredible except to people of faith. Every real Christian accepts this as God’s truth and word of God. The Scripture says so.

Matt. 1:18  the birth of Jesus Christ came about: His mother Mary was pledged to be married to Joseph, but before they came together, she was found to be with child through the Holy Spirit. (NIV)
John 8:56-58  Your father Abraham rejoiced at the thought of seeing my day; he saw it and was glad. “You are not yet fifty years old,” the Jews said to him, “and you have seen Abraham!” “I tell you the truth,” Jesus answered, “before Abraham was born, I am!” (NIV)

     Matt. 1:18 states that the Virgin Mary gave birth to baby Jesus. This record is indeed an absurdity and impossible to explain in human language. But those who are born again accept this story as genuine and necessary. Why? In John 8:56-58 Jesus said, “Before Abraham was born, I am!” Before Jesus was born, He was! This makes no sense and is illogical outside the Bible. Likewise, when we read a statement like, “There are three Gods but one God, and there is one God but three Gods. There are three Persons but one Person, and there is one Person but there are three Persons. There are three Lords but one Lord,” this makes no sense outside the Scripture. But these are the truths of the Scripture.


2 Kin. 2:11-12  As they were walking along and talking together, suddenly a chariot of fire and horses of fire appeared and separated the two of them, and Elijah went up to heaven in a whirlwind. Elisha saw this and cried out, “My father! My father! The chariots and horsemen of Israel!” And Elisha saw him no more. (NIV)

     The text shows that the prophet Elijah went up to heaven while alive swept away to heaven in a whirlwind! It is impossible to give a proper explanation of this miracle of God outside the Bible. It makes no sense at all, but it is Bible truth and written by God’s prophet.

2 Kin. 5:27  Elisha said to Gehazi, “Naaman’s leprosy will cling to you and to your descendants forever.” Then Gehazi went from Elisha’s presence and he was leprous, as white as snow. (NIV)

     Gehazi was made leprous, as white as snow, by only the spoken word of Elisha. Can this record be true? It is God’s truth in the Bible.    

Acts 1:9-11  After he said this, he was taken up before their very eyes, and a cloud hid him from their sight. They were looking intently up into the sky as he was going, when suddenly two men dressed in white stood beside them. “Men of Galilee,” they said, “why do you stand here looking into the sky? This same Jesus, who has been taken from you into heaven, will come back in the same way you have seen him go into heaven.” (NIV)

     The text records that Jesus was crucified, then buried in a borrowed tomb for three days. The Holy Spirit made Him alive! Then He preached forty more days before ascending into heaven. Jesus will come back again! It is impossible to explain this story with the context of human experience. Moreover, the Bible is full of facts that seem to be paradoxical and nonsensical, as shown by the records cited above. Likewise, the existence of the Trinity seems to be paradoxical, but it is indeed the truth of God. It can only be accepted as the word of God through faith in Jesus Christ.

The Athanasian Creed comments on the doctrine of the Trinity.

Eternal is the Father; eternal is the Son; eternal is the Spirit: And yet they are not three eternal beings, but one who is eternal...Thus the Father is God; the Son is God; the Holy Spirit is God: And yet there are not three gods, but one God. Thus the Father is Lord; the Son is Lord; the Holy Spirit is Lord: And yet there are not three lords, but one Lord...but all three persons are in themselves, coeternal and coequal; and so we must worship the Trinity in unity and the one God in three persons. (This Creed is summarized from the Trinity of the original Athanasian Creed by author.)

     The Creed says, “Eternal is the Father; eternal is the Son; eternal is the Spirit: And yet they are not three eternal beings, but one who is eternal.” This is unbiblical. It should be said, “Eternal is the Father; eternal is the Son; eternal is the Spirit. They are three eternal beings but one eternal being. One eternal being but three eternal beings” since as already noted, the Bible records it as so.
     The Creed says, “the Father is God; the Son is God; the Holy Spirit is God: And yet there are not three gods, but one God.” This is unbiblical. It should read, “the Father is God; the Son is God; the Holy Spirit is God: And there are three Gods, but one God.” The OT and NT record it as so, as noted.
     The Creed says, “The Father is Lord; the Son is Lord; the Holy Spirit is Lord: And yet there are not three lords but one Lord.” This is unbiblical. It should read, “the Father is Lord; the Son is Lord; the Holy Spirit is Lord. And there are three Lords but one Lord. There is one Lord but three Lords.” The Bible records it as so.
     The Creed speaks of “the one God in three persons.” This is unbiblical since the Bible does never witness to this. It should be said, “There are three persons but one person, and there are three Gods but one God” since the Bible says so. It seems to be illogical and paradoxical but this is the testimony of the Bible.

Paul Althaus comments on the Trinity of Martin Luther.

Luther says, “Scripture thus cleverly proves that there are three persons and one God. For I would believe neither the writings of Augustine nor the teachers of the church unless the New and Old Testaments would clearly show this doctrine of the Trinity.” He emphasizes the “one-ness” and the “three-ness” equally. God is one and three. This one-ness is at the same time the three-ness of distinct “persons.” One God in three persons-every person is the entire deity and yet no person exists as the deity for itself without the other two. This all is based on the Scripture. Reason admittedly finds all this talk about one-ness and three-ness in God a stumbling block. But since it is based on clear Scripture, reason must be silent at this point and we must believe. The concepts used to express this mystery may very well be inadequate. Scripture does not speak of the “Trinity.” Luther says that the three “persons” cannot be theologically distinguished from each other by anything else than their respective relationships to one another as Father, Son, Spirit. Paul Althaus, The Theology of Martin Luther, Philadelphia: Fortress press, 1966, p.199-200)
 
     To say, “Scripture clearly proves that there are three persons and one God” is correct. Consider the note, “He emphasizes the ‘one-ness’ and the ‘three-ness’ equally. God is one and three. This one-ness is at the same time the three-ness of distinct persons.” This is correct also. However, the words “One God in three persons” are unbiblical since One God is not in three persons. It should be “One God but three Gods, and one person but three persons.” The note “every person is the entire deity and yet no person exists as the deity for itself without the other two” is biblical since the Bible says so. This note simply concluded, “God in fact exists as Trinity.” To say, “The concepts used to express this mystery may very well be inadequate,” seems to be correct but almost incorrect. If the doctrine of the Trinity in the OT and NT is thoroughly understood, the mystery of the Trinity is clearly explained. To say that Scripture does not speak of the “Trinity” is incorrect. Though Scripture does not directly use the term “Trinity,” Scripture speaks of “Trinity” in detail from Genesis to Revelation.

John Calvin comments on the subject “Oneness” of the doctrine of the Trinity.

In Scripture, from the creation onward, we are taught one essence of God, which contains three persons (John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, Vo1. 1, Ch. 13). There are three persons in God. They cannot shake our conviction that three are spoken of, each of which is entirely God, yet that there is not more than one God (Ibid., Vol. 1, Ch. 13, 2-3). It is quite clear that in God’s essence reside three person in whom one God is known...Therefore, since that there is one God, not more, is regarded as a settled principle, we conclude that Word and Spirit are nothing else than the very essence of God. (Ibid., Vol. 1, Ch. 13, 16)

     There are not “three persons in God,” that is, three persons are not in one God. To write, “three are spoken of, each of which is entirely God” is correct and biblical, but “yet that there is not more than one God, there is one God, not more” is unbiblical. It should be “There are three separate Gods but one God, and one God but three separate Gods.” The Bible says so.
 

John Calvin comments on the subject “Threeness” of the doctrine of the Trinity.

Again, Scripture sets forth a distinction of the Father from the Word, and of the Word from the Spirit. Yet the greatness of the mystery warns us how much reverence and sobriety we ought to use in investigating this. And that passage in Gregory of Nazianzus vastly delights me: “I cannot think on the one without quickly being encircled by the splendor of the three; nor can I discern the three without being straightway carried back to one. Let us not, then, be led to imagine a trinity of persons that keeps our thoughts distracted and does not at once lead them back to that unity. Indeed, the words “Father,” “Son,” and “Spirit” imply a real distinction but a distinction, not a division. The passages that we have already cited show that the Son has a character distinct from the Father. Christ implies the distinction of the Holy Spirit from the Father when he says that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father [John 15:26; cf. ch.14:26]. He implies the distinction of the Holy Spirit from himself as often as he calls the Spirit “another,” as when he announces that he will send another Comforter [John 14:16], and often elsewhere(Ibid., Vol. 1, Ch. 13, 17). I really do not know whether it is expedient to borrow comparisons from human affairs to express the force of this distinction...It is not fitting to suppress the distinction that we observe to be expressed in Scripture (Ibid., Vol. 1, Ch. 13, 18). By a certain characteristic the Father differs from the Son and the Son the Spirit. (Ibid., Vol. 1, Ch. 13, 22)

     The note, “the Son has a character distinct from the Father. Christ implies the distinction of the Holy Spirit from the Father when He says that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father, and by a certain characteristic the Father differs from the Son and the Son the Spirit,” is right and biblical since the Bible says so. Through this note it can be found that there are three separate persons, that is, three separate Gods, that is, the Father, the Son and the Spirit, and the three persons are not in one God. John Calvin insists that there are three persons in God. But his doctrine of the Trinity is inconsistent. There is no scriptural reference which would indicate that there are three persons in God.

Billy Graham comments on the doctrine of the Trinity.

When I first began to study the Bible years ago, the doctrine of the Trinity was one of the most complex problems I had to encounter. I have never fully resolved it, for it contains an aspect of mystery. Though I do not totally understand it to this day, I accept it as a revelation of God. The Bible teaches us that the Holy Spirit is a living being. He is one of the three persons of the Holy Trinity. To explain and illustrate the Trinity is one of the most difficult assignments to a Christian...God unfolds His revelation of Himself in the Bible progressively. But there are indications from the very beginning of the Book of Genesis that God subsists in three persons - the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit - and that these three persons constitute the one God. Christianity is Trinitarian, not Unitarian. There is only one God, not three, so it is clear that the Christian faith is not polytheistic. The Bible begins with the majestic statement: “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” (Gen. 1:1). Hebrew scholars have told me there are three numbers in the Hebrew language: Singular, one; dual, two; plural, more than two. The word translated “God” in Genesis 1:1 is plural, indicating more than two. The Hebrew word used here is Elohim. Matthew Henry says it signifies “the plurality of persons in the Godhead, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. This plural name of God...[confirms] our faith in the doctrine of the Trinity...It is not one plus one plus one equals three. It is one times one time one equals one. The chief problem connected with the doctrine of the Trinity concerns Christianity’s claim to be also monotheistic. It rejects polytheism, the belief in more than one God. The answer is that trinitarianism preserves the unity of the Godhead, and at the same time it acknowledges that there are three persons in that Godhead which is still of one essence. God is one, but that oneness is not simple–it is complex. This is a terribly difficult subject–far beyond the ability of our limited minds to grasp fully. God the Father is fully God. God the Son is fully God. God the Holy Spirit is fully God. The Bible presents this as fact. One Christian heresy in the early church was called “modalism.” It taught that God appeared at different times in three different modes of forms-as Father, then, as Son, and finally as Holy Spirit. Those who held this view thought it preserved the unity of monotheism. But it also meant that when Jesus prayed, He had to be talking to Himself. Further, to say, as Acts 2 does, that the Father and the Son sent the Holy Spirit makes little sense if we accept modalism. The Greek construction makes Matthew 28:19 clear that Jesus is referring to three separate persons. He clearly taught the doctrine of the Trinity. We have seen that the Holy Spirit is a person, and is God, and is a member of the Trinity. (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, p.7-11)

     The note, “The Bible teaches us that the Holy Spirit is a living being. He is one of the three persons of the Holy Trinity,” is true. The Holy Spirit is a living being. Likewise, the Father is a living being and the Son is a living being. It can be concluded that there are three separate living beings. The statement, “...the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, and these three persons constitute the one God. There is only one God, not three. God the Father is fully God. God the Son is fully God. God the Holy Spirit is fully God,” is a mixture of correct and incorrect doctrines. If each person is fully God, since there are three persons, there are three Gods. The note “these three persons constitute the one God” is right, but the note, “There is only one God, not three” is incorrect.
     It should be said that there are three Gods but only one God, and there is only one God but three Gods. This seems to be paradoxical to human understanding, but it is obviously true since the Bible says so. The statement, “The Greek construction makes Matthew 28:19 clear that Jesus is referring to three separate persons. He clearly taught the doctrine of the Trinity. We have seen that the Holy Spirit is a person, and is God, and is a member of the Trinity,” is biblically right. If each person is fully God just as Billy Graham noted here, it must be inferred that there are obviously three Gods. Thus it is proven that “there is only one God, not three” is inconsistent with “there are three Gods.”

Harry N. Wendt comments on the doctrine of the Trinity.

The Bible teaches: (1) There is only one God, Genesis 1:1; Deuteronomy 6:4; Isaiah 42:8. (2) There are three Persons in that one God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, Matthew 28:19; 2 Corinthians 13:14. (3) Though each Person is fully God, each Person is distinct from the other two Persons, Matthew 25:34; John 16:12-15. (4) In the New Testament, we read that the Father “begat” the Son (Hebrews 1:5; 5:5) and that the Father and Son “sent” the Spirit, John 14:16; 16:7. These terms do not mean that one Person existed before another. They point to distinctions between the Persons, not to events in the sweep of time. The Holy Spirit is depicted by a dove, Matthew 3:16. The Spirit leads people to believe and do the very things Jesus would them to believe and do if Jesus were still visibly active on earth, John 16:12-15. Very simply, the Holy Spirit continues Jesus’ work (sanctification, making holy).
The Bible does not distinguish sharply between the Persons of Trinity; note how Trinitarian terms overlap in Romans 8:9,10. Nor does the Bible divide the “works” into watertight compartments; it teaches that the Triune God creates, redeems, and sanctifies, 2 Corinthians 5:19. The doctrine of the Trinity is a mystery we can not understand. However, though we cannot understand the fractions of the Trinity, we are called to praise the three Persons of the one Triune God for their gracious works, or fractions, on our behalf. Over the centuries, wrong ideas about the Trinity have been taught. (1) Some divide God up into three equal portions, think of each Person as a third of God (the Trinity by division). The Bible does not teach this. (2) Some speak as though each Person is a separated god (the Trinity by addition). However, the Bible teaches that there are three Persons within the one God, not three gods. (3) Some suggest that the one God simply acts in different ways at different times-sometimes as the Father, sometimes as the Son, and sometimes as the Holy Spirit. (4) Some say that the Father alone is God, that at some point in time (creation, or the conception of Jesus) the Father created the Son, and that the Holy Spirit is merely God’s power at work in the world. The Trinity cannot be explained. The Trinity can only be believed and praised. (Harry N. Wendt, quote from The Divine Drive, Minneapolis: Crossways International, 1995, p.33,35)

     The statement   “The Bible teaches: There is only one God, Genesis 1:1” is quite erroneous. The LXX Septuaginta Ralfs translates the Hebrew plural Elohim as the Greek singular ho theos (ὁ θεὸς). Also every English version translates the plural Elohim as the singular “God,” as noted above. But the Hebrew plural Elohim in Genesis 1:1 must be translated as “Gods.” Genesis does not teach that there is only one God. To write, “There is only one God” is correct, but “There are three Persons in that one God” is quite erroneous. It should be, “There are three Persons, that is, three Gods but one God since three Persons are not in one God.”
     The note, “Though each Person is fully God, each Person is distinct from the other two Persons,” is biblical. There are three separate Gods since each Person is fully God and each Person is distinct from the other two Persons. The Scripture confirms that there is only one God but three Gods. This explanation seems to be paradoxical but it is Bible truth since the Bible records it.
     To say that “The Bible does not distinguish sharply between the Persons of Trinity” is quite erroneous. For example, Luke 3:21-22 indicates a clear distinction between the Persons of Trinity. Rom. 8:9-11 does not indicate a sharp distinction between Christ and the Spirit. If the doctrine of the Trinity is not thoroughly understood, the harmony of Luke 3:21-22 and Rom. 8:9-11 cannot be understood. The OT and NT state in detail the doctrine of the Trinity, that is, three Persons are one Person, and three Gods but only one God, as noted above. The note “The Trinity cannot be explained” is right. The Trinity cannot be comprehended in human terms. The Trinity can only be explained with Bible language. The note “The doctrine of the Trinity is a mystery we can not understand” seems to be right but it is incorrect. From Genesis to Revelation, the Bible is filled with many mysteries and revelations. If the Bible record is accepted as genuine as written by the inspired servants of God, the doctrine of the Trinity can simply be understood. The note, “Some speak as though each Person is a separate god. However, the Bible teaches that there are three Persons within the one God, not three gods,” is quite erroneous.
     The Bible does not teach that there are three Persons within the one God. The Bible obviously teaches that each Person is a separate God, and there are three Persons but one Person, and three Gods but only one God. If the doctrine of the Trinity written in the OT and NT is not understood, it becomes impossible to construct a biblical doctrine of the Holy Spirit. Every English version, without a single exception, has many mistranslations regarding the Holy Spirit because the translators misunderstood the Trinity.
     Sometimes Bible translators and scholars accept the Holy Spirit as God and a divine Person; sometimes they do not. For an example, in the case of Acts 2:4, every English version, without a single exception, translates this verse as, “They were all filled with the Holy Spirit.” This is thoroughly unbiblical. In this case, the Holy Spirit is by no means treated as God and a divine Person but as a material noun like water or an abstract noun like power or joy. Therefore, the phrase “They were all filled with the Holy Spirit” is from the mistranslation of the Greek text and misunderstanding of the Trinity. (See the detailed discussion on the mistranslation of Acts 2:4)

Stanley M. Horton comments on the doctrine of the Trinity.

The repetition of the phrase “and of” (Matthew 28:19) also makes it clear that each is respected as a distinct Person within the One God. (Stanley M. Horton, What the Bible says about the Holy Spirit, p.110)
In this sense also, the Holy Spirit is truly “another Comforter” as Jesus promised He would be (John 14:16). In another sense, without detracting from the promise of a future Second Coming, Jesus in John indicates that He himself comes to us in the Holy Spirit, for the Holy Spirit mediates both the Father and the Son to us (John 14:18,20,23). When Jesus says, “I will not leave you comfortless (orphans): I will come to you” (John 14:18), He means by the Holy Spirit. Yet by calling the Spirit another Comforter, Jesus sharply distinguishes between himself and the Holy Spirit as a distinct Person. Jesus is not the Spirit. As the risen Lord, Jesus sends the Spirit (John 15:26; 16:7). By “another,” the Greek means another of the same kind. That is, the Spirit comes to do for us everything Jesus did for His disciples and more. He was their Comforter. (Ibid., p.123)

     The note “Each is respected as a distinct Person within the One God” is erroneous since each Person is not “within the One God.” Each is fully God and each Person is distinct from the other two Persons. There are three separate Persons so that there are three separate Gods and each Person is fully God. Therefore, the biblical words of the Trinity must be “three Persons but one Person, that is, three Gods but one God.” This doctrine is taught by the OT and NT.
     The note, “Jesus sharply distinguishes between himself and the Holy Spirit as a distinct Person. Jesus is not the Spirit. As the risen Lord, Jesus sends the Spirit,” is obviously correct. But also it should be understood in the context of the following passages. 2 Cor. 3:17 records, “Now the Lord is the Spirit.” 1 Cor. 12:3 records, “no one can say, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ except by the Holy Spirit.” Obviously these passages indicate that Jesus is the Lord, and the Lord is the Spirit, so that Jesus is the Spirit. It should be noted that Jesus does and does not make a sharp distinction between Himself and the Holy Spirit as distinct Persons. While this does not make sense to carnal reasoning, it is scriptural truth.
     In John 14:18 Jesus, before His crucifixion, directly said to His disciples, “I will not leave you orphans; I will come to you.” Here, the word “I” means simply Jesus Christ Himself. This promise was fulfilled on the day of Pentecost, but Jesus Christ did not come to the disciples on that day. Instead, the Holy Spirit sent by Jesus who is in heaven came to them. Therefore, the words of Jesus (“I will not leave you orphans; I will come to you”) clearly mean that the Holy Spirit was to come to the disciples.   
     They were not to be orphans. In Matt. 28:20 Jesus said, “I am with you always, even to the end of the age.” This was after crucifixion and resurrection and before He ascended into heaven. Though it was impossible for Jesus to be with His disciples after His ascension, he still said, “I am with you always, even to the end of the age.” According to the literal translation, this makes no sense, but if Jesus Christ is accepted as the Holy Spirit, it is certainly true. In this case, the doctrine of the Trinity, “God the Father = God the Son = God the Spirit,” must be applied to John 14:18 and Matt. 28:20. The word of Jesus in both passages can simply be understood.

Chuck Smith comments on the doctrine of the Trinity.

Some people have suggested that the Trinity is a mathematical absurdity. One plus one plus one, they point out, equals three, But this proves nothing. One times one times one equals one. You can’t disprove the Godhead mathematically. No, we must stick to what the Bible declares about the nature of God. And it says the Holy Spirit is God. It teaches us there is one God, manifested in three Persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. (Chuck Smith, Living Water, Santa Ana: The word For Today, 2001, p.24)

     The Bible declares there are three Persons, “the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.” So three Persons must mean there are three Gods. Each Person is God. In this case, it should be said, “One plus one plus one equals three mathematically.” The Bible also declares there is only one God, that is, the three Gods “the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit” is one God. In this case, it should be said, “One plus one plus one equals one.” This of course is a mathematical absurdity and contradiction. It must be concluded that there are three Gods but one God, and one God but three Gods. The statement of Chuck Smith “the Bible teaches us there is one God, manifested in three Persons” is right, but not a perfect interpretation. It should state that the Bible also teaches us there are three Gods, manifested in three Persons.  All this explanation seems to be contradictory, but it is biblical truth.
     The Westminster Confession says: “There is but one living and true God. In the unity of Godhead there are three persons. One God of one substance, power and eternity, God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit” (Ibid., p.25). The note “There is but one living and true God” is right. And the note “In the unity of Godhead there are three persons” means that in the unity of Godhead there are three Gods, that is, “God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit.” Consequently, it should be inferred that there is one living true God, and three Persons, that is, three Gods. Again this seems to be contradictory to human reason, but if this is not accepted as the doctrine of the Trinity in the Bible, it is impossible to understand the Trinity.

Guy P. Duffield and Nathaniel M. Van Cleave comment on the doctrine of the Trinity.

The three Persons are in evidence at one time at the baptism of Jesus. Jesus ascends from the waters of baptism, the Holy Spirit descends from heaven in the visible form of a dove, the Father speaks from heaven saying, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased” (Mt. 3:16,17). All three are in manifestation at the same time. The Father speaks of the Son as another identity in whom He is pleased. The Spirit has an identity separate from the other two…In the fourteen chapter of John we have a clear proof of the three distinct Person of the Trinity. First, in verse nine, Jesus says to Phillip, “he that hath seen me hath seen the Father.” Here it is clear that Jesus and the Father are one.
Yet at the same time they have separate identities, for Jesus says to the disciples. “And I will pray the Father and He shall give you Another Comforter, that he may abide with you forever…But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you (Jn. 14:16,26). There are three separate identities (not individuals), yet one God, not three. The Trinity is beyond our comprehension, yet the unmistakable teaching of Scripture. (Guy P. Duffield and Nathaniel M. Van Cleave, Foundations of Pentecostal Theology, Life Bible College at LA, 1983, p.89-90)


     The notes, “The Trinity is beyond our comprehension, yet the unmistakable teaching of Scripture, and the three Persons are in evidence at one time at the baptism of Jesus, and in the fourteen chapter of John we have a clear proof of the three distinct Person of the Trinity,” are biblical. But the note, “There are three separate identities (not individuals), yet one God, not three,” is quite erroneous. It should be, “There are three Persons (three separate identities) but one Person, one Person but three Persons so that there are three Gods but one God, one God but three Gods.” It is a paradox outside the Bible but it is God’s truth written in the Bible.