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All English Versions mistranslate the Greek εἰς in 1 Cor. 12:13 as “into.” It must be translated as “in.”

1 Cor. 12:13 ἐν ἑνὶ πνεύματι ἡμεῖς πάντες εἰς ἓν σῶμα ἐβαπτίσθημεν (BNT)  

CSBwe were all baptized by one Spirit into one body.
CJB by one Spirit that we were all immersed into one body,
DRAin one Spirit were we all baptized into one body,
ESVin one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
GNVby one Spirit are we all baptized into one body.
GWN  By one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
NAUby one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
KJVby one Spirit are we all baptized into one body.
NKJ by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
NIV  we were all baptized by one Spirit into one body.
NET  in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
NIBwe were all baptised by one Spirit into one body.
NRSin the one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
NABin one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
NASby one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
NJB we were baptised into one body in a single Spirit.
NLTwe have all been baptized into Christ’s body by one Spirit.
RWB by one Spirit were we all baptized into one body.
BBEthe baptism of the one Spirit we were all formed into one body.
DBY  in the power of one Spirit we have all been baptised into one body.
ABby one  Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
TNIV we were all baptized by one Spirit so as to form one body.

     Every English version except the TNIV mistranslates the Greek preposition eis in 1 Cor. 12:13 as “into.” The TNIV also mistranslates it. The following statements written by scholars are based on 1 Cor. 12:13, but all scholars have accepted a mistranslation as authentic. Unfortunately, all the following statements are virtually and thoroughly inaccurate since their statements are based on the mistranslation.
     When the Greek preposition eis in 1 Cor. 12:13 is not correctly translated, it becomes impossible to understand the Holy Spirit and the meaning/purpose of the baptism of the Holy Spirit. It is also impossible to construct the doctrine of the Holy Spirit. In our present Christian society the doctrine of the Holy Spirit is incorrectly constructed because of the mistranslation of the Greek text.

The Amplified Bible translates Acts 1:5 and 1 Cor. 12:13 as follows:

Acts 1:5: For John baptized with water, but not many days from now you shall be baptized with–placed in, introduced into–the Holy Spirit.

1 Cor. 12:13: For by (means of the personal agency of) one (Holy) Spirit we were all, whether Jews or Greek, slaves or free, baptized [and by baptism united together] into one body.

John Calvin comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

Paul says, “All of you who have been baptized...have put on Christ (Gal. 3:27). Again, all of us who have been baptized in Christ are one body and one spirit” (1 Cor. 12:13). (John Calvin, Vol. IV, Ch. 14, v. 7)
We have been engrafted into the body of Christ through baptism (1 Cor. 12:13). (Ibid., Vol. IV, Ch. 16, v. 22)

Merrill F. Unger comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

Scripture reveals that all believers are in the body of Christ by virtue of Spirit baptism and that all possess one or more gifts of the Spirit as a result. This, as already noted, is the clear declaration of the central passage on the baptism of the Spirit, 1 Co 12:13 (Merrill F. Unger, A Theology of the Holy Spirit, p.137). The baptism of the Spirit brings the believer into organic union with the body and under the imputed merits and power of Christ, the Head. (Ibid., p.96)

Rene Pache comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

The nature of the Holy Spirit’s baptism. Our definition will be drawn from the most lucid text which the New Testament contains on this subject (I Cor. 12:13). “For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body, whether Jews or Greeks whether bond or free; and were all made to drink of one Spirit.” From this we can infer that the Spirit’s baptism is the act whereby God makes us members of Christ's Body. (Rene Pache, The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit, p.71)

John F. Walvoord comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

In all, there are eleven specific references to spiritual baptism in the New Testament (Matt. 3:11; Mark 1:8; Luke 3:16; John 1:33; Acts 1:5; 11:16; Rom. 6:1-4; 1 Cor. 12:13; Gal. 3:27; Eph. 4:5; Col. 2:12). All references prior to Pentecost are prophetic. All the references after Pentecost treat the baptism of the Holy Spirit as an existing reality. The major passage, which may be taken as the basis of interpretation of the other passages, is 1 Corinthians 12:13. (John F. Walvoord, The Holy Spirit, Grand Rapid: Zondervan, 1981, p.139)
It is evident from 1 Cor. 12:13 that all Christians are baptized by the Holy Spirit, and that all who enter the number of the body of Christ do so because they are baptized by the Spirit. Never in Scripture is baptism by the Spirit recorded as occurring subsequent to salvation. According to 1 Corinthians 12:13 the baptism of believer is “into one body.” Using the figure of the human body as representing the church, individual believers are revealed to be joined to this living church by the baptism of the Holy Spirit. Intimately connected with the fact that the baptism by the Spirit brings the believer into the body of Christ is the inseparable truth that baptism also places the believer in Christ Himself (Ibid., p.140-141) Through the baptism with the Spirit, the Christian has become as much an organic part of Christ as the branch is a part of the vine, or the member is a part of the body. (Ibid., p.143) The Christian baptized by the Spirit is joined to the body of Christ. (Ibid., p.149)

John R. W. Stott comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

Let me enlarge on my point in this way. In every kind of baptism (of water, blood, fire, Spirit, etc.) there are four parts. To begin with, there are the subject and the object namely the baptizer and the baptized. Thirdly, there is the element with or in (en) which, and fourth, there is the purpose for (eis) which, the baptism takes place. Take, an example, the crossing of the Red Sea, which the apostle Paul describes as a kind of baptism (I Cor 10:1,2). Presumably God himself was the baptizer. Certainly the escaping Israelites were baptized. The element in which the baptism was administered was water or spray from the cloud and the sea, while its purpose is indicated in the expression ‘baptized into Moses,’ that is, into relationship with him as their God-appointed leader. In John’s baptism, John the Baptist was the subject, while the objects were the people of ‘Jerusalem and all Judea and all the region about the Jordan’ (Mt. 3:5). The baptism took place in (en) the waters of the River Jordan and was for or unto (eis) repentance (Mt. 3:11) and therefore the remission of sins (Mk 1:4; Lk 3:3). Christian baptism is similar. The minister baptizes the professing believer with or in (en) water. And the baptism is into (eis) the one name of the Trinity (Mt. 28:19), or more precisely into the name of the Lord Jesus (Acts 8:16; 19:5), that is, into the Christ crucified and risen (Rom. 6:3, 4). It will be seen from these examples that in every kind of baptism there are not only a subject and an object, but also both an en and an eis, that is, both an element with or in which, and a purpose of which, the baptism is administered. And the purpose of this baptism is incorporation ‘into (eis) one body,’ namely the body of Christ, the church. (John R. W. Stott, Baptism & Fullness, p.38-42)

John F. MacArthur comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

Paul wrote, “By one Spirit we were all baptized into one body, whether Jews or Greeks, whether slaves or free, and we were all made to drink of one Spirit.” Spirit baptism brings the believer into a vital union with Christ. To be baptized with the Holy Spirit means that Christ immerses us in the Spirit, thereby giving us a common life principle. This spiritual baptism is what connects us with all other believers in Christ and makes us part of Christ’s own body. Baptism with the Spirit makes all believers one. It is a fact, not a feeling. Unfortunately, the tremendous truth of that verse has been greatly misunderstood. Paul was blending two vital thoughts here. One is that the church, the body of Christ, is formed through Spirit baptism, and the other is that the life of the body is sustained as we all are made to drink of one Spirit. The twin ideas of immersion by the Spirit and drinking of the Spirit picture the all-sufficient relationship with the Spirit of God that bonds each believer to Christ and the rests of the body. (John F. MacArthur, Charismatic Chaos, p.231)
In Romans 8:9 Paul says, “If any one does have the Spirit of Christ, he does not belong to Him.” If we take away the concept that every believer is baptized and indwelt by the Holy Spirit, we destroy the doctrine of the unity of the body. Paul’s whole point in 1 Corinthians 12:12-13 is that all Christians are baptized with one Spirit into one body. We are all in one body possessing one life source, indwelt by one Christ. (Ibid., p.231-232)
Spirit baptism places the Christian in the body of Christ. (Ibid., p.234) The Christian is baptized with the Holy Spirit into the body of Christ at the moment of belief (1 Cor. 12:13; Rom 8:9). There are seven references in the New Testament to the baptism with the Spirit. (Ibid., p.313)

R. A. Torrey comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

Potentially, every member of the body of Christ is baptized with the Holy Spirit. For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body...and have been al1 made to drink into one Spirit (1 Cor. 12:13). But there are many believers with whom that which is potentially theirs have not become a matter of real, actual, personal experience. Just so, while the baptism with the Holy Spirit is potentially the possession of every believer, each individual believer must appropriate it for himself before it is experientially his. We may go still further than this and say that it is only by the baptism with the Holy Spirit that one becomes in the fullest sense a member of the body of Christ, because it is only by the baptism with the Spirit that he receives power to perform those functions which God has appointed him as a part of the body. (R. A. Torrey, The Person & Work of the Holy Spirit, Grand Rapid: Zondervan, 1982, p.151-3)

Stanley M. Horton comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

John baptized in water. Jesus baptizes in the Holy Spirit. The believer must submit or yield to Jesus before he can be baptized. But the contrast between water and Spirit is very strong in all these passages. Emphatically, Jesus has nothing to do with water. John’s baptism was only a preparation for the new age of the Spirit, while Jesus’ baptism is actually a part of it. (Stanley M. Horton, What the Bible say about the Holy Spirit, p.137)
The unity of the body of Christ is actually the first work of the Holy Spirit. He does not just give us spiritual life and let us go off by ourselves. He baptizes us into the body of Christ (12:13). He plunges us in, no matter who we are, right along with Jews and Gentiles, slaves and free. Then he makes us all drink (be watered, saturated) with the same Spirit. (Ibid., p.214)
This verse (12:13) is interpreted in a variety of ways. One group insists that this is the same as Christ’s baptism of the believer into the Holy Spirit. They usually identify this with regeneration through the Spirit and often with water baptism. Or they may say that Pentecost brought a massive deposit of the Spirit into the Church and we get our share automatically when we are baptized into the Church. Others allow for fillings of the Spirit but not baptism after regeneration. These claim that 12:13 should be translated, “For in one Spirit also we all were baptized so as to form one body,” that is, they make the Spirit the element into which we are baptized at conversion. The argument for this translation is that “by” one Spirit should be “in” one Spirit. They argue that the Greek word en always means “in” when it is used with the word baptize. This is true of the six cases that compare John’s baptism in water with Jesus’ baptism in the Holy Spirit. But, in spite of the fact that most traditional scholars identify 12:13 with water baptism, we must recognize that a believer should already be part of the spiritual body of Christ if water baptism is to be a meaningful testimony. Thus, the baptism into the Body can not be identified with water baptism. Moreover, the word en often does mean “by.” In some cases it is used with the Holy Spirit to mean “by the Holy Spirit.” Luke 4:1 uses it of Jesus led by the Spirit into the wilderness. Mark 1:12 confirms emphatically that the Spirit was indeed the agent. Luke 2:27 is a similar case-“came by the Spirit.” So is Ephesians 3:5 “revealed by the Spirit.” Though many feel that the evidence is not conclusive or that the translation is just a matter of choice, the context really is clear. An examination of the whole passage gives a firm backing for the usual King James Version, “by one Spirit.” The entire preceding passage emphasizes the unity of the Body by the fact that the various gifts are given by the one and the same Spirit. The Spirit is the one who is the agent giving the gifts. In verses 8 and 9, the word en is used interchangeably with the word dia, meaning “through.” Whether by the Spirit or through the Spirit, the Spirit is clearly the agent. (Ibid., p.215)
 The baptism in 12:13 is thus very definitely by the Spirit into the body of Christ and is therefore distinct from the baptism by Christ into the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. This fits in well with the distinction between conversion and the baptism in the Holy Spirit found in the Book of Acts. (Ibid., p.216)

Donald T. Williams comments on Pentecostal theology.

Pentecostal theology distinguished between being baptized into the church by the Holy Spirit which happens to all believers at conversion, and being baptized with the Holy Spirit by Jesus which happens only to some, usually after conversion. Speaking tongues is viewed as the evidence that this second has taken place. Some fringe groups hold that tongues speaking is necessary for salvation, but their thinking is not representative. (Donald T. Williams, The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit, Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publisher, 1994, p.124)

Robert Gromacki comments on the baptism in the Hoy Spirit.

The baptism in the Holy Spirit places every believer into the spiritual body of Christ, the true church. We who are called of God to salvation are placed into the body of Christ, namely, the true church, by the baptism in the Holy Spirit. (Robert Gromacki, The Holy Spirit, p.492)

Howard Erwin, a neo-Pentecostal Baptist, claimed that there are two separate baptisms in the Holy Spirit. “It should be noted that the baptism in the Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:13 is not the same as the baptism in the Spirit at Pentecost. The former places one in the body of Christ, the Church. The latter is for manifested in charismatic witnessing.” Ervin’s mentor, David du Plessis, held the same position. He wrote, “All too often we hear people talk about the baptism of the Spirit when they mean in or with. The baptism of the Spirit comes at conversion or regeneration…The Holy Spirit is the baptizer, the Church is the element into which He baptizes, and the unregenerated sinner is the object that is baptized.” He also identified this event as the baptism by the Spirit. This distinction of two baptisms in the Holy Spirit is a minority view within the Pentecostal movement, although both du Plessis and Ervin are very influential. However, this distinction cannot be maintained exegetically because the same Greek construction is used in all passages. To be consistent, the preposition en should be translated ‘in.” It cannot arbitrarily be translated “of” or “by” to just to confirm to a predetermined view. (Ibid., p.496)

Billy Graham comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

 “For by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body” (I Cor 12:13). Two things stand out in that verse; first, the baptism with the Spirit is a collective operation of the Spirit; second, it includes every believer. All believers are baptized with the Holy Spirit. (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, p.67-68)
For example, some Christians hold that the Spirit’s baptism only comes at some time subsequent to conversion. The biblical truth, it seems to me, is that we are baptized into the body of Christ by the Spirit at conversion. This is the only Spirit baptism. I used to wonder if I had been wrong in thinking that having been baptized by the Spirit into the body of Christ on the day on my conversion I needed no more other baptism. But the longer I have studied the Scriptures the more I have become convinced that I was right. From that day onward, the Holy Spirit has lived in the hearts of all true believer, beginning with the 120 disciples who received Him at Pentecost. When they received the Holy Spirit, He united them by His indwelling presence into one body - the mystical body of Christ, which is the Church....Their baptism by the Spirit was a clear sign that they too could be part of God’s people by faith in Jesus Christ. W. Graham Scorggie once said something like this at Keswick, “On the day of Pentecost all believer were, by the baptism of the Spirit, constituted the body of Christ.” (Ibid., p.70,73,74)

Merrill F. Unger comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

The Spirit’s baptizing work places believer in Christ (Ro. 6:3,4; 1 Co. 12:13; Col. 2:12). (Merrill F. Unger, The Baptism & Gifts of the Holy Spirit, p.22)
All are united organically into one body by one operation, the baptism of the Holy Spirit. Not only is the believer brought into the body of Christ by the baptizing work of the Spirit, but into Christ Himself. This same operation is called in 1 Corinthians 12:13 a baptism into the body of Christ. But since Christ is the Head of the body (Eph. 1:20-23), being baptized into Him is being vitally united to His body, the church. (Ibid., p.43-44)The Spirit, as He came, indwelt, and baptized the disciples at Pentecost into Christ the moment they received the great salvation provided by Christ’s work on the cross. (Ibid., p.69)
 

All the statements mentioned above can be summarized as follows:

•     The baptism with the Holy Spirit is to bring the new Christian into the body of Christ.   
•     We have been engrafted into the body of Christ through baptism.  
•     The Holy Spirit baptizes us into the body of Christ.
•     For in one Spirit also we all were baptized so as to form one body.
•     Baptism with the Spirit makes all believers one. One, because the church, the body of Christ, is formed through Spirit baptism.
•     Spirit baptism brings the believer into a vital union with Christ.
•     Spirit baptism places the Christian in the body of Christ.
•     The baptism by the Spirit brings the believer into the body of Christ.
•     The baptism of believer is into one body. The purpose of this baptism is incorporation into one body, the body of Christ, the church.
•     Through the baptism with the Spirit, the Christian has become a part of the body of Christ.
•     The Christian baptized by the Spirit is joined to the body of Christ.
•     On the day of Pentecost all believers were, by the baptism of the Spirit, constituted the body of Christ.
•     The baptism in 12:13 is thus by the Spirit into the body of Christ.
•     All Christians receive the Spirit’s baptism at the moment of regeneration.

     All these interpretations are literally different but have the same basic meaning. According to the literal description of 1 Cor. 12:13 translated above, all these interpretations seem to be biblical, but all are thoroughly unbiblical since all are based on the mistranslation of the Greek eis. It is almost impossible to translate 1 Cor. 12:13 through only this passage. The Greek proposition eis in other passages must be examined carefully. When other passages are examined, it is simple to see that the interpretations mentioned above are from the mistranslation of the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 12:13. Mark 1:9 needs to examine the same Greek grammatical construction of “eis” as found in 1 Cor. 12:13.

The Greek eis in 1 Cor. 12:13 must be translated as “in.”

Mark 1:9 Ἰησοῦς ἐβαπτίσθη εἰς τὸν Ἰορδάνην ὑπὸ Ἰωάννου. (BNT)
NIV    Jesus was baptized by John in (eis) the Jordan.

1 Cor 12:13 ἐν ἑνὶ πνεύματι ἡμεῖς πάντες εἰς ἓν σῶμα ἐβαπτίσθημεν (BNT)
NIV    We were all baptized by one Spirit into (eis) one body.

     Both passages must be consistently translated. Both have the same Greek grammatical construction. When the same Greek grammatical passage is different- ly translated, it makes no sense. Therefore, both passages must be consistently translated. The Greek text in Mark 1:9 does not have the word “River” but Mark. 1:5 does. “River” can be added in order to clear the meaning. Here, the word “all” in 1 Cor. 12:13 can be omitted for simplification. Every English version translates the Greek preposition eis in Mark 1:9 as “in.” If the Greek preposition eis in Mark 1:9  is translated as “in,” “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 must be also consistently translated as “in” because both are in the same Greek grammatical construction. It makes no sense otherwise. Therefore, “eis” in both passages must be consistently translated as “in” as follows:

Mark 1:9          Jesus was baptized by John in (eis) the Jordan River.
1 Cor. 12:13    We were baptized by one Spirit in (eis) one body.

     Both passages must be consistently interpreted as follows since both are in the same grammatical construction.

Mark 1:9    After entering into the Jordan River, Jesus was baptized by John.
                  * On having already been in the Jordan, Jesus was baptized by John.
1 Cor. 12:13  After entering into the one body of Jesus, we were baptized by the Holy Spirit.
                  * On having already been in one body, we were baptized by one Holy Spirit.

    Will anyone object to this interpretation? Both statements are the same. If this is accepted as correct, controversial debates on the interpretation of 1 Cor. 12:13 should end. The sentence “entering into the one body of Jesus” means that an unbeliever receives Jesus as his Savior and Lord. To receive Christ as Savior and Lord is to be in one body of Christ. If anyone receives Jesus as Savior and Lord, he belongs to Jesus and becomes a member of the body of Jesus at that moment. To receive Jesus as Savior and Lord is to be born again as a Christian, that is, to be a regenerated believer. If one insists that “eis” (1 Cor. 12:13) must be translated as “into,” then the “eis” of Mark 1:9 must be translated as “into since both are in the same grammatical construction.
      When there is inconsistency in the translation of passages that have the same grammatical construction, it makes no sense. Passages with the same grammatical construction must be translated consistently. This rule is a basic principle of translation. Obviously inconsistency leads to mistranslation, and mistranslation obviously leads to misunderstanding and misinterpretation.

The Bible confirms that “baptize + eis” is used of the same meaning “baptize + en.”

Mark 1:9    Jesus was baptized by John in (eis) the Jordan River.
Mark 1:5    They were baptized by John in (en) the Jordan River.

     All English versions translate the “eis” of Mark 1:9 as “in.  This is consistent with Mark 1:5. This correct principle of translation must be applied consistently to all the same grammatical passages; but not every English version applies this principle to 1 Cor. 12:13. So there is no consistency in translation.
     If one insists that the Greek preposition eis in 1 Cor. 12:13 should be “into,” the Greek preposition eis in Mark 1:9 should be also “into” since both are the same grammatical construction. Both must be interpreted consistently. Mark 1:9 and Mark 1:5 obviously indicate the need to follow this strict principle of translation [baptize eis and baptize en]. In the case of [baptize eis and baptize en], both prepositions (eis and en) have the same meaning, so the Greek preposition eis in Mark 1:9 and 1 Cor. 12:13 must be translated as “in.”

If “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 is translated as “into,” “eis” in Mark 1:9 also must be “into.”

Mark 1:9       Jesus was baptized by John into (eis) the Jordan River.
1 Cor. 12:13 We were baptized by one Spirit into (eis) one body.

Let’s examine the case, “We were baptized by one Spirit into one body.”

     Many scholars interpret 1 Cor. 12:13 as “the baptism by the Spirit brings us into one body of Christ.” It seems to make sense and be accurate. This principle of interpretation of 1 Cor. 12:13 must be applied to that of Mark 1:9 since both have the same grammatical construction.

Let’s examine the case, “Jesus was baptized by John into the Jordan River.”

     The interpretation, “the baptism by John brings Jesus into the Jordan River,” makes no sense. The baptism by John did not bring Jesus into the Jordan River. Jesus did not enter into the Jordan River through the baptism of John the Baptist. He entered into the Jordan River to be baptized by John, and John baptized Jesus with/in water in the Jordan River. Therefore, to state “the baptism by the Spirit brings us into one body of Christ” makes no sense at all. It is confirmed as quite erroneous. That interpretation of 1 Cor. 12:13 is based upon the mistranslation of the Greek preposition eis. Only when it is translated “in,” it makes sense. The Greek preposition eis in both passages of 1 Cor. 12:13 and Mark 1:9 must be translated consistently as “in (eis) one body and in (eis) the Jordan River.” Then, both make sense.

Let’s examine the case, “We were baptized by one Spirit into one body.”

     One scholar interpreted this as “the Spirit’s baptism places the Christian in the body of Christ.” It seems to be biblical. Accordingly the same principle must be  applied to both I Cor. 12:13 and Mark 1:9. They must be interpreted consistently because both are in the same grammatical construction. Mark 1:9, “Jesus was baptized by John into (eis) the Jordan River.” Can it be said, “the baptism by John placed Jesus in the Jordan River”? No. The baptism by John did not place Jesus in the Jordan. Jesus entered into the Jordan River to be baptized. John baptized Jesus with/in water when He was in the Jordan River, that is, after he was already in  the Jordan River. Likewise, it makes no sense to interpret I Cor.  12:13, “the baptism by the Spirit brings us into one body of Christ.” This erroneous interpretation is from the mistranslation of the Greek eis. If it be “in,” it makes surely sense. Therefore, the Greek preposition eis in both passages must be translated as “in (eis) one body” and “in (eis) the Jordan River.” Consistency demands that 1  Cor. 12:13 should be interpreted to show that the believer was baptized by the Spirit in one body of Christ, or the Spirit baptized the believer when he was in one body of Christ just as John baptized the believer when he was in the Jordan River. This is the interpretation that makes sense. Every translation must make sense. If it does not make sense, it is a mistranslation.

Let’s examine the case, “We were baptized by one Spirit into one body.”

     One scholar interpreted this passage as “through the baptism by the Spirit, the Christian becomes a part of Christ.” This seems to be correct. According to the principle of interpretation applied to 1 Cor.12:13, Mark 1:9 (since it has the same grammatical construction) must be interpreted as follows. “Jesus was baptized by John into the Jordan River.” This should read, “through the baptism by John, Jesus became a part of the Jordan River.” This makes no sense at all. By his baptism Jesus did not become a part of the Jordan River. As we have seen, Jesus entered the Jordan River to be baptized by John. John baptized Jesus with/in water when Jesus was in the Jordan River. “Eis” in both passages must be consistently transla- ted in,” so 1 Cor. 12:13 must be, “We were baptized by one Spirit in (eis) one body.”

Let’s examine the case, “We were baptized by the Spirit into one body.”

     John Calvin gave this interpretation: “We have been engrafted into the body of Christ through baptism.” This seems to make sense, but according to this principle of interpretation Mark 1:9 should then read: “Jesus was baptized by John into the Jordan River.” It makes no sense to teach that Jesus was engrafted into the Jordan River through baptism. Likewise, if 1 Cor. 12:13 is interpreted as “We have been engrafted into the body of Christ through baptism,” it makes no sense at all. This is from the mistranslation of the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 12:13.

Let’s examine the case, “We were baptized by the Spirit into one body.

     Another scholar interpreted this as “the Holy Spirit baptizes us into the body of Christ.” This seems to make sense, but according to this principle of interpretation Mark 1:9 should then read: “Jesus was baptized by John into the Jordan River.” This makes no sense. Likewise, if 1 Cor. 12:13 is interpreted as “The Holy Spirit baptizes us into the body of Christ,” it makes no sense. This is from the mistranslation of the Greek eis. 1 Cor. 12:13 must be “The Holy Spirit baptizes us in (eis) the body of Christ.”

Let’s examine the case, “We were baptized by the Spirit into one body.”

     One scholar interpreted this as “the church, the body of Christ, is formed throu- gh Spirit baptism.” This seems to make sense, but according to this principle of interpretation Mark 1:9 should read “the Jordan River is formed through John’s baptism.” This makes no sense at all. Similarly, to interpret 1 Cor. 12:13 as “the church, the body of Christ, is formed through Spirit baptism” makes no sense. All of these suggestions are from the mistranslation of the Greek eis. If the word “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 as well as in Mark 1:9 is translated “in,” there will be no wrong interpretations. The meaning will be clear. The Greek preposition eis in both pa- ssages must be translated consistently as “in” since both have the same grammatical construction.

Let’s examine the case, “We were baptized by the Spirit into one body.”

     One scholar interpreted this as “the Christian baptized by the Spirit is joined to the body of Christ.” Again, this seems to make sense, but according to this prin- ciple of interpretation Mark 1:9 should read. “Jesus baptized by John was joined to the Jordan River.” This makes no sense at all. Likewise, to interpret 1  Cor. 12:13 as “the Christian baptized by the Spirit is joined to the body of Christ” makes no sense. This springs from the mistranslation of the Greek eis. If the word “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 and Mark 1:9 is consistently translated, there will be no erroneous interpretations. The Greek preposition eis in both passages must be “in” since both have the same grammatical construction.
 

Let’s examine the case, “We were baptized by the Spirit into one body.”

    One scholar interpreted this as “the baptism of believer is into one body, and the purpose of this baptism is incorporation ‘into (eis) one body,’ namely the body of Christ, the church.” If “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 is translated as “into,” it seems to make sense. According to the same principle applied to 1 Cor. 12:13, Mark 1:9 should be interpreted as follows: “Jesus was baptized by John into the Jordan River.” If this is interpreted as “the baptism of Jesus is ‘into the Jordan River,” the purpose of this baptism appears to be incorporation into (eis) the Jordan River. This makes no sense at all. Therefore, if 1 Cor. 12:13 is interpreted as “the baptism of believer is ‘into one body’ and the purpose of this baptism is incorporation ‘into one body,’ namely the body of Christ, the church,” it is thoroughly inaccurate. As we have seen, all of these interpretations are from the mistranslation of the Greek “eis.” If the word “eis” of 1 Cor. 12:13 and Mark 1:9 is translated as “in,” there will be no misinterpretations. The note “the baptism of believer is into one body, and the purpose of this baptism is incorporation ‘into (eis) one body,’ namely the body of Christ, the church” must be “the baptism of believer is in one body, and the purpose of this baptism is by no means incorporation ‘into (eis) one body,’ namely, the body of Christ, the church.” While 1 Cor. 12:13 does not record the meaning/ purpose of the Holy Spirit’s baptism, Acts 1:5 and 1:8 do. To be baptized with/ in/by the Holy Spirit is to receive the power of the Holy Spirit.
     The argument “the baptism of the Spirit is different from the fullness of the Spirit” is also from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of 1 Corinthians 12:13. Billy Graham’s statement, “the purpose of the baptism with the Holy Spirit is to bring the new Christian into the body of Christ,” is surely based on the mis- translation and wrong interpretation of 1 Cor. 12:13. Although most scholars, Pentecostal and non-Pentecostal, agree with Billy Graham, this interpretation springs from the mistranslation of the Greek eis.
     Billy Graham insists that “the baptism of the Spirit is different from the fullness of the Spirit, and the baptism with the Holy Spirit is to bring the new Christian into the body of Christ and no interval of time falls between regeneration and baptism with the Spirit, and all Christians are baptized with the Spirit at the moment of they are regenerated, and in addition, they are filled with the Spirit.” (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, 79)

This also springs from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of the Greek eis in 1  Cor. 12:13. If it were to read, “We were all baptized by one Spirit in (eis) one body,” there would be no erroneous interpretations or controversial debates on either the doctrine of regeneration or the doctrine of the baptism of the Holy Spirit.
     Stanley M. Horton cited above insists, “The baptism in 12:13 is very definitely by the Spirit into the body of Christ and is therefore distinct from the baptism by Christ into the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost.” This too is based on the mistranslation of the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 12:13. It should read, “The baptism in 12:13 is by the Spirit in the body of Christ and is not distinct from the baptism by the Holy Spirit sent by Christ in the body of Christ at Pentecost.” Consequently, the baptism of (by) the Spirit received by the 120 disciples at Pentecost must be the same as the baptism by the Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:13.

Every English version inconsistently translates “baptize + eis” in the NT.

Mark 1:9     Jesus was baptized by John in (eis) the Jordan.

     Every English version translates “eis” in v. 9 as “in.” This translation is correct.

Matt. 28:19     Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in (eis) the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.

     Many versions (BBE, CSB, DRA, ESV, GNV, GWN, MIT NAU, KJV, NKJ, NAS, NET, NIV, TNIV, NIRV, RSV, TEV, NAB, NEB, NLT, NJB, RWB, WEB) translate the Greek “eis” in Matt. 28:19 as “in,” but inconsistently translate “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 as “into.”  If “eis” in both passages were to be translated consistently as “in,” it would be possible to construct a legitimate doctrine of the Holy Spirit. The CJB, LB, ASV, and AB erroneously translate “eis” in Matt. 28:19 as “into.”
     J. Rodman Williams comments, “The longer Matthean statement suggests that water baptism is entrance into a new relationship to God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The Greek word for ‘in’ (‘baptizing them in...’) is ‘eis’ which though it may simply mean ‘in’ may also be translated ‘into.’ As we have early noted, ‘eis’ may also signify ‘with reference to,’ hence ‘in relation to.’” (J. Rodman Williams, The Gift of the Holy Spirit, Plainfield: Logos International, 97) The teaching that “eis in Matt. 28:19 may also be translated as into” is quite erroneous. It should be “in.” It is presumptuous to assume the baptism referred to in Matt. 28:19 is only water baptism. In fact the baptism in Matt. 28:19 must include two kinds of baptism, that is, water baptism and the baptism of the Holy Spirit.
     The note, “water baptism is entrance into a new relationship to God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,” is erroneous since before receiving water baptism the one to be baptized is already a believer and has already a new relationship to God as the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit through his faith in Jesus.
     It should be noted that the phrase “baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” is distinct from the phrase “baptizing them into the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” The translation “baptizing them in...” is correct, but “baptizing them into…” is flawed. If one has accepted Jesus, he has already been in the name of Jesus, that is, in Jesus. To receive Jesus is to be in Jesus. To receive Jesus is to be His disciple. To be His disciple is to be in Him. Before being baptized with/in water one must be already in the name of Jesus. That one has already become His disciple. Because of that faith in Jesus, he will be baptized with/in water in the name of Jesus. Therefore, “baptizing them ‘eis’ the name...” must be translated as “baptizing them ‘in’ the name...” Here, a strict principle of translation comes to light: “baptize  + eis” in the NT, without a single exception, consistently must be translated as “baptize +  in.” Accepting this translation will end great controversial debates regarding the baptism with/in water as well as the baptism of the Holy Spirit.

Acts 2:38     Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in (epi ἐπὶ ) the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins. (KJV)

     The AB, CSB, ESV, GWN, KJV, LB, MIT, NAS NET, NKJ, NIV, NIRV, TNIV, NLT, NAB, NEB, RSV, TEV, and NJB translate the Greek epi (ἐπὶ) as “in.”

Acts 8:16     Only they were baptized in (eis) the name of the Lord Jesus. (In author’s writing most italics are added to the original translations.)

     The CSB, ESV, GWN, KJV, MIT, NKJ, NAS, RSV, TEV, LB, NAB, NET, NIRV, NLT, NJB, and NEB translate “eis” as “in” and CJB, NIV, TNIV, NEB, and AB mistranslated “eis” as “into,” but All versions translate “eis” of 1 Cor. 12: 13 as “into.”

Acts 10:48     He commanded them to be baptized in (en) the name of the Lord.

     The CJB, CSB, ESV, GWN, KJV, MIT, NET, NKJ, NIV, NIRV, NLT, TNIV, NAS, RSV, TEV, LB, AB, NAB, NEB, and NJB translate the word en as “in.” Had Cornelius already received Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord in response to Peter’s preaching? Yes. Therefore, he and his household were already in the name of the Lord Jesus before being baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Acts 10 confirms that “baptizing them in (eis) the name of Jesus” is correct translation.

Acts 19:3-5     He said unto them, unto (eis) what then were ye baptized? And they said, unto (eis) John's baptism. Then said Paul, John verily baptized with the baptism of repentance, saying unto the people, that they should believe on him...that is, on Christ Jesus. When they heard this, they were baptized in (eis) the name of the Lord Jesus. (KJV)

     The KJV translates the word “eis” in Acts 19:3 as “unto,” but the same word in Acts 19:5 is translated inconsistently. The word “eis” in Acts 19:5 must be “in.” The NAS and RSV translate just as the NKJ, TEV and NJB do. The word “eis” in Acts 19:3 is missing. The word “eis” in Acts 19:5 must be translated as “in.” The NIV, TNIV, and NEB removed the word “eis” from Acts 19:3, but in Acts 19:5 translated it as “into.” When the word “eis” is inconsistently translated it is absolutely impossible to build a consistent doctrine of the Holy Spirit. There must be a consistent translation of “baptize + eis.” Without a single exception, “baptize + eis” in the NT must be translated consistently as “baptize + in.”   

Rom. 6:3-4     Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into (eis) Jesus Christ were baptized into (eis) his death? Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into (eis) death. (KJV)
DRA     Know you not that all we who are baptized in (eis) Christ Jesus are baptized in (eis) his death? For we are buried together with him by baptism into (eis) death.

     The CJB, CSB, ESV, GWN, NET, KJV, NKJ, NAS, NIV, NIRV, TNIV, NEB, RSV, TEV, AB, NAB, and NJB translate the word “eis” as “into.” The MIT and DRA inconsistently translated “eis” in Romans 6:3-4 as either “in” or “into.” The phrase “we were baptized in Jesus Christ” is distinct from the phrase “we were baptized into Jesus Christ.” It should be “we were baptized in Jesus Christ.”
The Lutheran Book of Worship says, “Make all who are baptized into Christ faithful in their calling to be your children, (The Lutheran Church in America, Lutheran Book of Worship, Minneapolis: Augsburg Publishing House, 1978, 15) and when we were baptized in Christ Jesus, we were baptized into his death.” (Ibid., 206) Here, it mistakenly states that to be baptized into Christ is the same as to be baptized in Christ. It should be “to be baptized in Christ.”  

Col.  2:12     buried with him in (en) baptism, wherein also ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead. (KJV)

     The KJV, NKJ, NAS, RSV, NIV, TNIV, LB, AB, NEB and NAB translate the word “en” as “in.” The NJB translates the word “en” as “by.”

1 Cor. 1:13-15 Or were ye baptized in (eis) the name of Paul? I thank God that I baptized none of you, but Crispus and Gaius; Lest any should say that I had baptized in (eis) mine own name. (KJV)

     The CSB, ESV, GWN, NKJ, KJV, NAS, NET, NIRV, NLT, RSV, NAB, NJB, and NEB translate the word “eis” as “in,” but inconsistently translate “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 as “into.” The TEV omitted the word “eis” from this verse. The CJB, GNV, NIV, NIB and TNIV translate “eis” as “into.” The Amplified Bible translates 1 Cor. 1:13-15, “Was Paul crucified in behalf of you? Or were you baptized ‘into’ the name of Paul? Lest any one should say that I baptized ‘in’ my own name?” This translation is completely inconsistent.

1 Cor. 10:2   All were baptized into (eis) Moses in the cloud and in the sea. (NKJ)
DRA             All in (eis) Moses were baptized, in the cloud and in the sea.
GWN           They were all united with Moses by baptism in the cloud and in the sea.

     The CJB, CSB, ESV, NET, NKJ, NAS, RSV, NIV, NIRV, TNIV, AB, NAB, NEB, and NJB translate “eis” as “into.” The KJV translates “eis” as “unto.” The DRA translates it as “in.” The LB says, “God guided them by sending a cloud that moved along ahead of them; and he brought them all safely through the waters of the Red Sea. This might be called their ‘baptism’ - baptized both in sea and cloud! - as followers of Moses - their commitment to him as their leader.” The TEV translates it as “in the cloud and in the sea they were all baptized as followers of Moses.”

Gal. 3:27     For as many of you as have been baptized into (eis) Christ have put on Christ. (KJV)

     The CJB, CSB, ESV, KJV, MIT, NKJ, NAS, RSV, NET, NIV, NIRV, TNIV, TEV, LB, AB, NAB, and NJB translate “eis” as “into,” but GWN as “in.” Without a single exception, every English version consistently translates “baptize eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 as “baptize into.” This translation is definitely incorrect and misleads those who seek an understanding of the Holy Spirit. It is absolutely impossible to build the doctrine of the Holy Spirit without a correct translation of “baptize eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13. In the NT [baptize + eis and baptize + en], the Greek [eis and en] have the same grammatical construction and must be consistent in their meaning. Without a single exception, every mention of “baptized eis” must be translated consistently as “baptize in.” If it reads, “baptize into,” it makes no sense at all. As we have seen, all the controversial debates between Pentecostals and non-Pentecostals on the issue of “the baptism of the Holy Spirit and regeneration” are from the mistranslation of “baptize eis” and the Greek verb “lambano +  the Holy Spirit.” If “baptize eis” is translated as “baptize in” and not as “baptize into,” there will be no controversial debates on the issue of the relation between regeneration and the baptism of the Holy Spirit. There is no scriptural reference to indicate that the baptism of the Holy Spirit takes place at the moment of regeneration. The following passages must be consistently translated and interpreted as follows because they are in the same grammatical construction.  

Acts 19:5 must be carefully examined to understand 1 Cor. 12:13.

Acts 19:5 ἀκούσαντες δὲ ἐβαπτίσθησαν εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ (BNT)
NIV       On hearing this, they were baptized into the name of the Lord.
TNIV     On hearing this, they were baptized into the name of the Lord.
NIRV     After hearing this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus.
KJV       When they heard this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord.
NKJ       When they heard this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord.
NRS       On hearing this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord.

     Acts 19:5 must be consistently interpreted like that of Mark 1:9 and interpreted as follows: the   12 believers at Ephesus had not heard the gospel of Jesus Christ before meeting the apostle Paul, but they were the disciples of John the Baptist. They had received only the water baptism of John and not yet the water baptism of Jesus. What does the phrase, “On hearing this” mean? It speaks of the time before being baptized with/in water by the apostle Paul in the name of Jesus. Then they have received Jesus Christ Savior and Lord by the gospel of the apostle Paul. Before being baptized with/in water by Paul, they received Jesus as Savior through the gospel preached by Paul. Acts 19:5 says before being baptized by Paul they entered into the name of Jesus. After entering into the name of Jesus, on having already been in the name of Jesus, they were baptized with/in water by Paul.  
     As in the case of Mark 1:9, if it is said that through the water baptism by John, Jesus entered into the Jordan River, it makes no sense at all. Likewise, if it is said that through the water baptism by Paul, they entered into the name of Jesus, it makes no sense. Therefore, Acts 19:5 must be translated, “They were baptized by Paul in (eis) the name of the Lord Jesus.” In this case it is simple to understand that before being baptized with/in water by Paul, they were already in the name of Jesus. They were baptized by Paul because they were in Jesus. Those who oppose this interpretation oppose reason and common sense. Without a single exception, this basic principle of translation and interpretation, seen in Matt. 3:6, Mark 1:5,9, and Acts 19:5, must be applied to every “baptize  + eis and baptize + en” in the NT.
     The Greek “baptize eis” of 1 Cor. 12:13 must be translated consistently as “in.” It is in the same grammatical construction found in Mark 1:5, Matt. 28:19, Acts 8:16 and Acts 19:5. 1 Cor. 12:13 means that before being baptized by the Spirit, we were already in the body of Jesus. Because we have already entered into the name of Jesus, and on having been in (eis) the name of Jesus, that is, in (eis) one body of Jesus, we were baptized by the Spirit. As we have seen, in the case of Mark 1:9, to say that through the baptism by John, Jesus entered into the Jordan River, makes no sense at all. Likewise, if it is said that through the baptism by the Spirit, we entered into one body of Jesus, it makes no sense at all. Therefore, 1 Cor. 12:13 must be translated, “we are all baptized by one Spirit in (eis) one body.” This harmonizes with Acts 19:5: “They were baptized by Paul in (eis) the name of the Lord Jesus.” In this case it is obvious that before being baptized by Paul, they were already in one body of Jesus. Because they had already come into the one body of Jesus, they were baptized by Paul. The same basic principle of translation and interpretation applied to Matt. 3:6, Mark 1:9 and Acts 19:5 must be applied consistently to 1 Cor. 12:13. The Scripture reveals that there is a strict principle of translation of “baptize + eis.”

Gal. 3:26-28 must be carefully examined to understand 1 Cor. 12:13.

Gal. 3:26-28    You are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus, for all of you who were baptized into (eis) Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in (en) Christ Jesus. (NIV)
GWN       Clearly, all of you who were baptized in (eis) Christ's name have clothed yourselves with Christ.

     Here, “baptize eis” must be “baptize in” just as in the GWN. If Gal. 3:26-28 is correctly interpreted, the right translation of 1 Cor. 12:13 is simplified. If anyone believes in Jesus Christ as his Savior and Lord, he belongs to Jesus. He becomes a son of God through his faith whether or not he is baptized with/in water or with/in the Spirit (and with/in fire). Every believer is a part of one body in Christ Jesus through faith in Him even though he may not be baptized with/in water or with/in the Spirit (and with/in fire). Before being baptized with/in the Spirit (and with/in fire) at Pentecost, the 120 disciples have already belonged to Jesus.
     They were obediently gathered in the Upper Room. They had faith in Him. They were already made one body of Christ before Pentecost. They could have by no means been in one body of Jesus through the baptism of (by) the Spirit before Pentecost. The Holy Spirit had not yet come and not yet baptized them with/in the Spirit. Every believer is indeed in the one body of Christ at the moment of believing in Jesus. Because they were already in one body, the 120 disciples were baptized by the Spirit sent by Jesus at Pentecost. 1 Cor. 12:13 must be translated, “We were all baptized by one Spirit in (eis) one body.” Without a single exception, all scholars accept erroneously, “We were all baptized by one Spirit into (eis) one body” as authentic.
 

John F. MacArthur comments on Acts 2:1-4.

Acts 2:1-4 teaches that at Pentecost, Christian believers were baptized with the Holy Spirit into the body. (John F. MacArthur, Charismatic Chaos, 235)

     Again, through faith in Jesus the 120 disciples of Christ were already in one body of Christ before being baptized with/in the Spirit (and with/in fire) on the day of Pentecost. This is the clear teaching of the Word. In John 15:5, Jesus said, “I am the vine; you are the branches.” Jesus’ disciples, Christian believers, the branches are in the vine, namely, in one body of the Vine. The 120 were in the Vine, that is, in Jesus before Pentecost. Then, at Pentecost the 120 disciples were baptized with/ in the Holy Spirit not into the body but in the body. They had already been in one body before being baptized with/in the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. The reason MacArthur’s comment is inaccurate is because he accepted the mistranslation of the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 12:13 as authentic. MacArthur continues:

Frederick Dale Bruner wrote, “Pentecostals believe that the Spirit has baptized every believer into Christ (conversion), but that Christ has not baptized every believer into the Spirit (Pentecost).” (Ibid., 210)

     The Pentecostal theology spoken by Frederick Dale Bruner is quite erroneous since it is based on the mistranslation and misinterpretation of “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13.

Donald T. Williams comments on Pentecostal theology.

Pentecostal theology distinguished between being baptized into the church by the Holy Spirit which happens to all believers at conversion, and being baptized with the Holy Spirit by Jesus which happens only to some, usually after conversion. (Donald T. Williams, The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit, 124)

     This summation of Pentecostal theology (“being baptized into the church by the Holy Spirit which happens to all believers at conversion, and being baptized with the Holy Spirit by Jesus which happens only to some, usually after con- version”) is based upon the mistranslation and misunderstanding of “eis” in 1 Cor. 12:13 and the baptism of the Holy Spirit.

The Samaritans have already been in one body of Jesus before meeting two apostles.

     The Samaritan believers have already been in the body of Christ through faith in Christ before being baptized with/in water by Philip in the name of Jesus. They were baptized with/in water by him in the name of the Lord Jesus before being baptized by (with/in) the Spirit through laying on of Peter’s and John’s hands. So they were baptized by (with/in) the Spirit in one body of Christ. Therefore, the book of Acts chapter eight confirms that the Samaritan believers have already been in the body of Jesus before being baptized by (with/in) the Spirit. Surely, they were not baptized by one Spirit into one body but in one body.

Paul has already been in one body of Jesus before being baptized by (with/in) the Spirit.

     Paul has been in Jesus as he prayed for three days before meeting Ananias the disciple of Jesus. He was in Jesus before Ananias placed his hands on him to be filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit, namely, to be baptized by (with) the Holy Spirit. He was already a member of the one body of Jesus before being filled with (the power) of the Spirit through Ananias. To be filled with (the power) of the Spirit is synonymous with “to be baptized with/in the Spirit (and with/in fire).” (See the detailed discussion on “to be baptized with the Spirit is to be filled with the Spirit.”) In the case of Paul, to say that he was baptized with (by) the Spirit into one body makes no sense. He was already in the body of Christ before being baptized with (by) the Spirit, that is, before being filled with (the power) of the Spirit.

Cornelius has already been in one body of God before being baptized by the Spirit.

     Cornelius lived in the period of transition between the times of OT and NT. According to Acts 10:1-35, he was already a son of God because he received God as God the Father before meeting Peter. If anyone is a son of God, he is in God, that is, he is in one body of God. In the case of Cornelius, no one preached the gospel of Jesus to him before he met Peter. He was baptized with (by) the Spirit when Peter preached the good news. Before hearing the gospel of Jesus through Peter, before the baptism of (by) the Spirit, he was already in the body of God through faith in God. He was baptized with (by) the Spirit in one body of God, that is, in one body of Jesus through Peter’s preaching without even the placing of Peter’s hands on him.

The 12 Ephesians have already been in one body before being baptized by the Spirit.

     These believers also lived in the transition period between the times of John the Baptist and NT. According to Acts 19:2-7, they were sons of God who believed in God. They were already baptized with the baptism of John the Baptist. If anyone is a son of God, he is in one body of God. In the case of the 12 Ephesian believers, no one preached the gospel of the ascended Jesus to them before they met Paul. Before Paul’s preaching, they had already become sons of God through faith in God, but after listening to the gospel of Jesus through Paul, they were baptized with/in water in the name of Jesus Christ. Before being baptized with/in water by Paul in the name of Jesus, they were changed from the disciples of John the Baptist into the disciples of Jesus. They received Jesus as Savior and Lord. After the baptism with/in water in the name of Jesus, they were baptized with (by) the Spirit when Paul placed his hands on them. So, before hearing the gospel of Jesus through Paul, before the baptism by the Spirit, they were already in one body of God through accepting God as God the Father through the teaching of the disciples of John the Baptist.
     Acts 19:2-7 tells us that after hearing the gospel of Jesus through Paul, before their baptism with water in the name of Jesus, before the baptism by the Spirit, these Ephesians were already in the body of Jesus. They had received Jesus as Savior and Lord. When one receives Jesus as Savior and Lord, he is immediately in Jesus, even though he has not been baptized with/in water in the name of Jesus. Let’s examine Acts 19:6. When Paul placed his hands on them the Holy Spirit came on them, and they spoke in tongues and prophesied. They were baptized by the Holy Spirit when Paul placed his hands on them. They were not baptized by the Holy Spirit into one body of Jesus but in one body of Jesus. The above cited Scriptures confirm that the reading “We were all baptized by one Spirit into one body” is  a mistranslation. Therefore, 1 Cor. 12:13 must be translated as “We were all baptized by (with/in) one Spirit in one body.”

John Stott comments on “The baptism is into the one name of the Trinity” (Matt. 28:19).

In John’s baptism, John the Baptist was the subject, while the objects were the people of ‘Jerusalem and all Judea and all the region about the Jordan’ (Mt. 3:5). The baptism took place in (en) the waters of the River Jordan and was for or unto (eis) repentance (Mt. 3:11) and therefore the remission of sins (Mk. 1:4; Lk. 3:3). Christian baptism is similar. The minister baptizes the professing believer with or in (en) water. And the baptism is into (eis) the one name of the Trinity (Mt. 28:19), or more pre- cisely into the name of the Lord Jesus (Acts 8:16; 19:5), that is, into the Christ crucified and risen (Rom. 6:3-4). (John R. W. Stott, Baptism & Fullness, 38-44)

     Stott’s statement is in great confusion and contradictory. “The baptism took place in (en) the waters of the Jordan River” is grammatically different from “the baptism took place with (in) water into (eis) the name of Jesus.” His argument “the baptism is into (eis) the one name of the Trinity (Mt. 28:19), or more precisely into the name of the Lord Jesus (Acts 8:16; 19:5), that is, into the Christ crucified and risen (Rom. 6:3-4)” makes no sense at all. To be sensible it should read, “the baptism is in (eis) the one name of the Trinity (Mt. 28:19), or more precisely in the name of the Lord Jesus (Acts 8:16; 19:5), that is, in the Christ crucified and risen (Rom. 6:3-4).” Why? Before being baptized with/in water, the professing believer must be in the name of Christ, that is, in Christ and therefore in the church. The water baptism by John took place in the Jordan River in the name of God. Likewise, the water baptism by the minister takes place in a church building (usually) in the name of Jesus. Stott’s confusion is basically from the mistranslation of the Greek eis of Matt. 28:19, Acts 8:16, 19:5, Rom. 6:3-4, 1 Cor. 10:2 and 12:13. These must not be translated as “into” but only “in.”  

Frederick D. Bruner comments on Matt. 28:19 and 1 Cor. 12:13.

John’s baptism was only with water; the baptism into Jesus Christ is nothing less but it is much more; it is baptism with the Spirit (cf. 1:5; 2:38; 19:5-6). (Frederick D. Bruner, A Theology of the Holy Spirit, 206)
Luke’s Acts is an independent exposition of the truth of the Matthean formula that to be baptized into the divine (or triune) name is, by definition, to be baptized at the same time into the Holy Spirit (Matt. 28:19). There is no necessity for separate baptism into each “person” of the trinity. (Ibid., 210.)

     The note “John’s baptism was only with water” is correct, but “the baptism into Jesus Christ” is quite erroneous. It should be “the baptism in Jesus Christ.” To say that “the baptism into Jesus…is baptism with the Spirit” is quite erroneous since the Spirit is not treated as God but as an element–in this case, like water. The note, “Christian baptism is into Jesus,” should read instead, “Christian baptism is in Jesus.” It should be inferred that Christian baptism which is in Jesus is of two kinds: water baptism and the baptism of the Holy Spirit. The words “to be baptized into the divine (or triune) name is, by definition, to be baptized at the same time into the Holy Spirit” (Matt. 28:19) should read to be baptized in the divine (or triune) name is, by definition, to be baptized at the same time in the Holy Spirit (Matt. 28:19). Christian baptisms, i.e., water baptism and the baptism of the Holy Spirit, take place in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.

Frederick D. Bruner insists that the 12 Ephesians’ baptism is into Jesus.

After explaining to the Ephesian disciples that Christian faith is “in Jesus” and that therefore Christian baptism is into Jesus, not into John, Paul for the first time baptized the twelve into (eis) “the name of the Lord,” with the laying on of hands, and the Ephesians received the Holy Spirit. (Ibid., 208.)

     This note is quite unbiblical. It should be as follows: After explaining to the Ephesian disciples that Christian faith is in Jesus and therefore Christian baptism is in Jesus, not in John the Baptist. Paul for the first time baptized the twelve in (eis) the name of the Lord. Through the laying on of hands, the 12 were filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit, i.e., they were baptized with/in the Spirit. Christian baptism is not into Jesus but in Jesus since all who have received Jesus as Savior and Lord are already in Jesus. That is, since one is in Jesus he can be baptized with/in water. Christian baptism does not take place into Jesus but in Jesus.

John F. Walvoord insists that the baptism of believer is into one body.

According to 1 Corinthians 12:13, “the baptism of believer is into one body.” (John F. Walvoord, The Holy Spirit, 140)

     This statement seems to make sense. The baptism of believer is “in one body.” Neither water baptism nor the baptism by the Spirit places a Christian into one body but is subsequent to being in one body. Every believer is in one body of Jesus through accepting Jesus as Savior. This precedes the receiving of the baptism with/in water or the baptism of the Spirit. The baptism of believer is not into one body but in one body.

The following translations of 1 Cor. 12:13 are thoroughly unbiblical.

1 Cor. 12:13     Through the baptism of the one Spirit we were all formed into one body. (BBE)
NEB    We were all brought into one body by baptism, in the one Spirit.
AB     By means of the personal agency of one (Holy) Spirit we were all baptized [and by baptism united together] into one body.
TNIV    We were all baptized by one Spirit so as to form one body.

     The BBE is erroneous because through receiving Jesus as Savior believers were all formed into one body before being baptized by the one Spirit. Likewise, the NEB mistranslates the Greek. It should be said that we were not all brought into one body by baptism, in the one Spirit, instead, we were all brought into one body by faith in Christ before being baptized with/in water and before being baptized with/in the Spirit and with/in fire (Luke 3:16). The TNIV (“We were all baptized by one Spirit so as to form one body”) is unbiblical since it is based on the mistranslation of “eis.” Believers were all baptized by one Spirit in one body.

The LB, TEV, AB, and NEB incorrectly translate 1 Cor. 10:1-2.

1 Cor. 10:1-2 God guided them by sending a cloud that moved along ahead of them; and he brought them all safely through the waters of the Red Sea. This might be called their “baptism”-baptized both in sea and cloud!-as followers of Moses-their commitment to him as their leader. (LB)
TEV     in the cloud and in the sea. they were all baptized as followers of Moses.
AB    And every one of them (allowed himself too) to be baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea, [that is, they were thus brought under obligation to the Law, to Moses and to the covenant, consecrated and set apart to the service of God].
NEB     And so they all received baptism into the fellowship of Moses in cloud and sea.
 
     The LB and NEB phrase (“They were all baptized as followers of Moses. Their baptism as followers of Moses-their commitment to him as their leader. They all received baptism into the fellowship of Moses”) is from the mistrans- lation of the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 10:2. Instead, it must be translated as “They were baptized in Moses in the cloud and in the sea.” The words “baptize eis” found in 1 Cor. 10:2 and 12:13 must be consistently translated as “baptize in.” That is, “All were baptized in (eis) Moses in the cloud and in the sea. We were all baptized by one Spirit in (eis) one body.”

1 Cor. 10:1-4 must be examined to understand the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 12:13.

1 Cor. 10:1     Moreover, brethren, I do not want you to be unaware that all our fathers were under the cloud, all passed through the sea, (NKJ)
1 Cor. 10:2     all were baptized into (eis) Moses in the cloud and in the sea, (NKJ)
1 Cor. 10:3    all ate the same spiritual food, (NKJ)
1 Cor. 10:4     all drank the same spiritual drink. For they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them, and that Rock was Christ. (NKJ)
DRA              And all in (eis) Moses were baptized, in the cloud and in the sea.

Ex. 13:1-3    The Lord said to Moses, Consecrate to me every firstborn male. The first offspring of every womb among the Israelites belongs to me, whether man or animal. Then Moses said to the people, Comme morate this day, the day you came out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery, because the Lord brought you out of it with a mighty hand. Eat nothing containing yeast. (NIV)

     Again the NKJ mistranslates the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 10:2, but the translation of the DRA is correct. The Scripture confirms that the Israelites had already belonged to Moses as the people of God before leaving Egypt. They were already in Moses their leader before leaving Egypt. Through the baptism, they did not enter into Moses. Before the baptism, they were already in Moses. Therefore, the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 10:2 must not be translated as “into” but “in.” Then, it must be “all were baptized in Moses in the cloud and in the sea.” What does this phrase mean?

Ex. 14:21-30: Then Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and all that night the Lord drove the sea back with a strong east wind and turned it into dry land. The waters were divided, and the Israelites went through the sea on dry ground, with a wall of water on their right and on their left. The Egyptians pursued them, and all Pharaoh’s horses and chariots and horsemen followed them into the sea.....Not one of them survived. That day the Lord saved Israel from the hands of the Egyptians, and Israel saw the Egyptians lying dead on the shore. (NIV)

Josh. 4:23: The Lord your God dried up the Jordan before you until you had crossed over. The Lord our God did to the Jordan just what he had done to the Red Sea when he dried it up before us until we had crossed over. (NIV)

     From these passages we conclude that the Israelites were saved through the Red Sea which God dried up, but the Egyptians drowned. The Israelites were also saved through the Jordan which God dried up in a similar fashion.

What does the phrase “They were baptized in Moses in the cloud and in the sea” mean?

Is. 4:5-6: Then the Lord will create over all of Mount Zion and over those who assemble there a cloud of smoke by day and a glow of flaming fire by night; over all the glory will be a canopy. It will be a shelter and shade from the heat of the day, and a refuge and hiding place from the storm and rain. (NIV)

1 Cor. 10:1: Moreover, brethren, I do not want you to be unaware that all our fathers were under the cloud, all passed through the sea. (NIV)

     The phrase “all our fathers were under the cloud” may mean that the Israelites were saved from the heat through the cloud, but they were certainly saved from going their own way by the visible, guiding presence of God. They were saved from predatory enemies by the visible, guarding presence of God.. The phrase “all passed through the sea” means that they were saved through the sea. Psalms 105:38-39 says, “Egypt was glad when they left, because dread of Israel had fallen on them. He spread out a cloud as a covering, and a fire to give light at night” (NIV). These passages confirm that the Israelites were saved through the covering of the cloud. Therefore, the phrase “baptized in the cloud and in the sea” means that they were saved through the cloud and the sea.

     Mark 16:16 says, “He who believes and is baptized will be saved.” This verse can be changed into “those who are baptized in God will be saved.” Therefore, 1 Cor. 10:2 should be interpreted to mean that the Israelites who were all baptized in Moses who is in God were saved through the cloud and the sea.
 
1 Peter 3:20-21 says, “...who disobeyed long ago when God waited patiently in the days of Noah while the ark was being built. In it only a few people, eight in all, were saved through water, and this water symbolizes baptism that now saves you also” (NIV).
     Noah and his family were saved through water. This symbolizes the baptism that saved them. The phrase “the Israelites were baptized in Moses in the cloud and in the sea” means the Israelites were saved through the cloud and sea. Here, the word “baptize” means neither water baptism nor the baptism of the Spirit. It is sometimes used of the symbol. Many scholars interpret “baptized in the cloud and in the sea” like “baptized in water.” This is in error since “water” is the element of water baptism, but “cloud and sea” cannot be the element of water baptism.

The term “baptize” in Mark 10:38-39 is used of a symbol.

Mark 10:38-39: You don’t know what you are asking, Jesus said. ‘Can you drink the cup I drink or be baptized with the baptism I am baptized with?’ ‘We can,’ they answered. Jesus said to them, ‘You will drink the cup I drink or be baptized with the baptism I am baptized with..., (NIV)

     Jesus was already baptized by John with/in water in the Jordan and received the baptism with/in the Holy Spirit (and with/in fire) before he began to preach the good news. Did He need to be baptized further? No. The baptism recorded in Mark 10:38-39 is distinct from those two baptisms. Jesus’ words in Mark 10:38-39 must carefully be understood. He asked two questions: “Can you drink the cup I drink? Or be baptized with the baptism I am baptized with?” These carry the same meaning. If this phrase, “when Jesus did drink the cup,” is correctly interpreted, the meaning of Mark 10:38-39 is simple to find.

Matt.   26:39: Going a little farther, he fell with his face to the ground and prayed, ‘My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken from me. Yet not as I will, but as you will.’ (NIV)

John 19:28-30: Later, knowing that all was now completed, and so that the Scripture would be fulfilled, Jesus said, ‘I am thirsty.’ A jar of wine vinegar was there, so they soaked a sponge in it, put the sponge on a stalk of the hyssop plant, and lifted it to Jesus’ lips. When he had received the drink, Jesus said, ‘It is finished.’ With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit. (NIV)
             
     The phrase “cup and the drink” in Matt.  26:39 and John 19:28-30 carries the same meaning as Mark 10:38-39. To “drink the cup I drink” symbolizes the cup of suffering and the drink of suffering. Therefore, the baptism in Mark 10:38-39 symbolizes the baptism of suffering. Likewise, the baptism in 1 Cor. 10:2 symbo- lizes the baptism of salvation. Peter also writes “...this water symbolizes baptism that now saves you” (1 Peter 3:20-21).

What does “We were all given the one Spirit to drink” in 1 Cor. 12:13b mean?

1 Cor. 12:13b   πάντες ἓν πνεῦμα ἐποτίσθημεν. (BNT)                   
                         πάντες εἰς ἕν Πνεῦμα ἐποτίσθημεν. (MGK)
ABAll made to drink of one (Holy) Spirit.
CJB  We were all given the one Spirit to drink.
ESV All were made to drink of one Spirit.
KJVWe have been all made to drink into one Spirit.
NKJ We have all been made to drink into one Spirit.
GWNGod gave all of us one Spirit to drink.
NIV We were all given the one Spirit to drink
NRS We were all made to drink of one Spirit.
NJBWe were all given the same Spirit to drink.
NETWe were all made to drink of the one Spirit.
NLTWe have all received the same Spirit.
NAB  We were all given to drink of one Spirit.
NAUWe were all made to drink of one Spirit.
NEB One Holy Spirit was poured out for all of us to drink.

     Which is the correct version? What does the phrase in 12:13b mean? According to the Greek text pneuma (πνεῦμα) is in an accusative noun and epotisthemen (ἐποτίσθημεν) is in a passive accusative verb, which requires an accusative noun. Therefore, the NIV translation “We were all given the one Spirit to drink” is from the original Greek text. According to the translation of the KJV, “We have been all made to drink into one Spirit” seems to be right but the phrase “drink into one Spirit” hardly makes sense because the Spirit is not treated as God. If it were to read, “We have been all made to drink in one Spirit,” it would be more accurate since it can be inferred that “We have been all made to [drink + something] in one Spirit.” Here, it can be inferred that “something” is omitted. “We were all given the one Spirit to drink” can be summarized simply but incorrectly, “We drank the Spirit.”
     It cannot be true that we literally drink the Spirit since the Spirit is God the Spirit and a divine Person. Let’s examine John 3:34, “For the one whom God has sent speaks the words of God, for God gives the Spirit without limit.” Sometimes the Bible must not literally be interpreted. If the phrase, “God gives the Spirit without limit,” is literally interpreted, the Spirit is not treated as God the Spirit but a material thing. John 3:34 must be interpreted, “...for God gives the words of God without limit through the Spirit.” Likewise, if “We drink the Spirit” is literally interpreted, the Spirit is not regarded as God the Spirit but a material thing such as water. We must be careful in the interpretation of the phrase, “We were all given the one Spirit to drink, that is, we drank the Spirit.” What does it mean? 1  Cor. 10:3-4 explains this phrase in detail.

1 Cor. 10:3-4 explains the meaning of “We were all given the one Spirit to drink.”

1 Cor. 10:3-4    They all ate the same spiritual food and drank the same spiritual drink; for they drank from the spiritual rock that accompanied them, and that rock was Christ. (NIV)

     To say ‘Christ was that rock’ makes no sense. Jesus is not a rock but a human being. What does it mean? These verses can be more easily understood by the following readings: “They drank the same spiritual drink from the spiritual rock that was Christ. They drank the water given by Christ who was the spiritual rock. They drank the living water given by Christ. They drank the living water given by the Spirit.” They did not drink the spiritual rock who was Christ. They did not drink Christ. They did not drink the Spirit. The phrase, “We were all given the one Spirit to drink,” means that we were all given the living water to drink by the one Spirit. We were all given the living water of the one Spirit to drink. The words “the living water” written in John 4:7-15 and 7:37-39 are omitted in 1 Cor. 12:13b.

 
Jer. 17:13: O Lord, the hope of Israel, all who forsake you will be put to shame. Those who turn away from you will be written in the dust because they have forsaken the Lord, the spring of living water. (NIV)
 
     The Lord will give you the living water from His spring of living water. Believers in Jesus will be given the living water to drink by their Lord. The phrase, “We were all given the one Spirit to drink,” means that we were all given the living water of the one Spirit to drink.

John 4:7-15 indicates the meaning of “We were all given the one Spirit to drink.”

     John 4:7-15 can be summarized, “The water that Jesus gives will become a spring of water welling up to eternal life. Jesus will give you the living water of life through the Spirit. You will be given the living water of the Spirit to drink.” These contain the same imagery as “We were all given the one Spirit to drink.” It should read: “We were all given the living water of the one Spirit to drink.”

John 7:37-39 explains the meaning of 1 Cor. 12:13b.

     The phrase of John 7:37-39, “By this he meant the Spirit, whom those who believed in him were later to receive (lambano),” is from the mistranslation of the Greek verb lambano. (See the detailed discussion on the translation of the Greek lambano.)
It must be translated, “By this he meant the Spirit, of whom those who believed in him were later to be filled with (the power).” John 7:37-39 means that “every believer who is filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit” will have the streams of living water given by the Holy Spirit. It can be concluded that to be filled with (the power) of the Spirit is to receive the living water of the Spirit. It is confirmed here that John 7:37-39 is the same meaning as 1 Cor. 12:13. If we are baptized with/in the Spirit, i.e., filled with (the power) of the Spirit, we will be given the living water of the Spirit to drink. It can be concluded that to be filled with (the power) of the Spirit, that is, to be baptized with/in the Spirit is to be filled with the living water of the Spirit.
     R. A. Torrey comments, “In John 7:37-39 Jesus bid all that are thirst to come unto Him and drink; the context makes it clear that the water He gives is the Holy Spirit, who becomes in those who receive Him a source of life and power flowing out to others. It is the glorified Christ who gives to the church the Holy Spirit. In John 4:10 Jesus Christ declared that He is the one who gives the living water, the Holy Spirit.” (R. A. Torrey, The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit, 46-47)
Torrey’s statement is a mixture of correct and incorrect elements. The note “the water He gives is the Holy Spirit” makes no sense. The water is not the Holy Spirit. John 7:37-39 means that those who receive Jesus will be filled with (the power) of the Spirit. They were given the living water by being filled with the power of the Spirit on the day of Pentecost.

Frederick D. Bruner comments on John 7:37-39:

“The Spirit shall flow with rivers of living water.” (Frederick D. Bruner, A Theology of the Holy Spirit, 254)

     Does the Scripture support this? The Scripture obviously says that whoever believes in Jesus, as the Scripture has said, streams of living water will flow from within him. But to declare, “The Spirit shall flow with rivers of living water,” is quite different. The phrase, “streams of living water will flow from within him,” means that streams of living water will flow from within those who were filled with the power of the Holy Spirit. Streams of living water will be given to those who were filled with the power of the Holy Spirit. The note “The Spirit shall flow with rivers of living water” does not treat the Spirit as God the Spirit and a divine Person.

Is. 12:2-3    Surely God is my salvation; I will trust and not be afraid. The Lord, the Lord is my strength and my song; he has become my salvation. With joy you will draw water from the wells of salvation. (NIV)

     “To be given the living water by the Spirit” means “to be filled with the joy of the Spirit.” The phrase “with joy you will draw water from the wells of salvation” tells believers that they will be filled with the joy given by the living water of salvation through the Lord, the Spirit.

Is. 66:10-14; Rev. 22:1; 22:17 explain the meaning of 1 Cor. 12:13b.

Is. 66:10-14: Rejoice with Jerusalem and be glad for her, all you who love her; rejoice greatly with her, all you who mourn over her. For you will nurse and be satisfied at her comforting breasts; you will drink deeply and delight in her overflowing abundance. For this is what the Lord says: I will extend peace to her like a river, and the wealth of nations like a flooding stream; you will nurse and be carried on her arm and dandled on her knees. As a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you; and you will be comforted over Jerusalem. When you see this, your heart will rejoice and you will flourish like grass; the hand of the Lord will be made known to his servants, but his fury will be shown to his foes. (NIV)

Rev.  22:1-2; 22:17: Then the angel showed me the river of the water of life, as clear as crystal, flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb down the middle of the great street of the city. On each side of the river stood the tree of life, bearing twelve crops of fruit, yielding its fruit every month. And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations. The Spirit and the bride say, “Come!” And let him who hears say, “Come!” Whoever is thirsty, let him come; and whoever wishes, let him take the free gift of the water of life. (NIV)

     These passages can be simply summarized, “the Spirit will gave him the free gift of the water of life, so he will be given the water of life to drink by the Spirit.” See 1 Cor. 12:13, 1 Cor. 10:3-4, Jeremiah 17:13, John 4:7-15, 7:37-39, Isaiah 66:10-14, Ezekiel 47:1-12, and Revelation 22:1-2, 22:17. These may be different meta- phors but each indicates that the water of life flows from Jesus, from God, and from the Holy Spirit, namely, the Trinity. Believers will receive the water of life given by the Holy Spirit when they are filled with the power of the Holy Spirit. The phrase, “We were all given the one Spirit to drink” makes no literal sense because the Holy Spirit is not literally water. Instead, it must be interpreted as “We were all given the water of life by the one Spirit to drink” or “We were all given the water of life of the one Spirit to drink.”
     1 Cor. 12:13 could be said to mean the Spirit gives the water of life to us in one body. John 4:7-15 says that Jesus gives the water of life to us in one body. John 7:37-39 says that Jesus gives the water of life through the Spirit. Revelation  21:9 says that the Spirit gives the water of life to us in one body. These are different literally but possess the same meaning according to the doctrine of the Trinity.

The Greek conjunction kai in 1 Cor. 12:13 must be carefully examined.

1 Cor. 12:13    For we were all baptized by one Spirit in one body–whether Jews or Greeks, slave or free–and we were all given the one Spirit to drink.

     If the proper meaning of the Greek conjunction καὶ  (and) in 1 Cor. 12:13 is supplied, this passage becomes simple to understand. Here, the Greek  καὶ implies “that is, or namely.” “We were all baptized by one Spirit in one body,” that is (namely), “We were all given the one Spirit to drink.” The phrase “We were all baptized by one Spirit in one body” can be rendered, “to be baptized by the Spirit in one body.”
     The phrase “We were all given the one Spirit to drink” literally makes no sense, as noted already. It must be, “We were all given the living water of the one Spirit to drink” and it can be rendered, “to be given the living water to drink by the Spirit to us in one body.” So it can be said, “to be baptized by the Spirit in one body, that is (namely,καὶ), to be given the living water to drink by the Spirit to us in one body.” From 1 Cor. 12:13, John 4:7-15 and  7:37-39, it can be constructed a doctrine of the Holy Spirit, “To be baptized by the Spirit is to be given the living water by the Spirit. To be baptized by the Spirit is to be filled with the living water given by the Spirit.”  

     Sinclair B. Ferguson interprets 1 Cor.12:13 as “In 1 Cor. 12:13 Paul indicates that all believers are baptized with the Spirit and drink the water of the Spirit.” (Sinclair B. Ferguson, The Holy Spirit, Downers Grove: Inter Varsity Press, 1996, 88)

     Ferguson translates “en the Spirit” as “with the Spirit.” In his note the relation between “all believers are baptized with the Spirit” and “drink the water of the Spirit” is ambiguous. Here, if the conjunction “and (καὶ )” in 1 Cor. 12:13 means “that is, or namely,” both relationships will be clear. That is, “all believers are baptized with (by) the Spirit, namely (καὶ) they drink the water of the Spirit, the water given by the Spirit.”

     Frederick D. Bruner interprets 1 Cor. 12:13, “It is the one Spirit, according to our text, who baptizes into the body of Christ (v. 13a), and in so doing he gives himself (v. 13b)! In baptism into Christ the baptism in the Holy Sprit occurred. And by the graphic picture of ‘drinking in’ Paul wishes to emphasize that Christians are not only baptized by the Spirit (v. 13a), but they are at the same time filled with him. He fills their innermost being.” (Frederick D. Bruner, A Theology of the Holy Spirit, 293-4)

     His statement would read more correctly as, “It is the one Spirit, according to our text, who baptizes in the body of Christ.” The note “In baptism into Christ the baptism in the Holy Spirit occurred” should be “In Christ the baptism of the Holy Spirit occurred.” To say that “the Spirit (he) gives himself (v. 13b)” is erroneous. Both notes (“They are at the same time filled with him. He fills their innermost being.”) contain basic errors since the Spirit is not treated as God. They are based on the mistranslation. “He fills their innermost being” is erroneous. It should be, “He fills their innermost being with something.” For instance, “The Holy Spirit fills their innermost being with His joy so that they are filled with the joy of the Spirit.”

The translation of 1 Cor. 12:13b must be consistent with that of Matt. 10:29.

Matt.10:29 οὐχὶ δύο στρουθία ἀσσαρίου πωλεῖται; καὶ ἓν ἐξ αὐτῶν οὐ πεσεῖται ἐπὶ τὴν γῆν ἄνευ τοῦ πατρὸς ὑμῶν.(BNT)
KJV    Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? And one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.
NKJ    Are not two sparrows sold for a copper coin? And not one of them falls to the ground apart from your Father’s will.

     The KJV translation is from the original Greek text, but it makes almost no sense since God the Father is omnipresent. Therefore, for the sake of clarity, the NKJ translates Matt. 10:29 as “Not one of them falls to the ground apart from your Father’s will.” To make sense, the NKJ added the word “will” which is not found in the Greek text of Matt. 10:29. (See the detailed discussion on the use of omission in the NT.)
     The phrase “We were all given one Spirit to drink” in 1 Cor. 12:13b is from the original Greek text, but this literally makes no sense since the Spirit is not treated as God the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit always must be regarded as God the Holy Spirit and a divine Person without a single exception. Therefore, the words “the living water” must be added to 12:13b to make sense and to be consistent with Matt. 10:29. The phrase “We were all given one Spirit to drink” must be translated and interpreted as “We were all given the living water of one Spirit to drink.” Now, biblically and clearly it makes sense.