logo

The translation of Acts 2:17-18

 

Richard B. Gaffin comments on Acts 2:17.

Jesus has poured out what you both see and hear. The outpouring of the Spirit as the promise of the Father…In contrast to the old covenant the Spirit is now poured out on all flesh (Acts 2:17). (Richard B. Gaffin, Perspectives on Pentecost, p.17,38.)

     This note is quite inaccurate. By the use of the phrase “Jesus has poured out what you both see and hear,” we can conclude that Jesus has poured out the gift of the Spirit. “What you both see and hear” does not imply the Holy Spirit since He is invisible and it is impossible to see Him. The note “The outpouring of the Spirit and the Spirit is now poured out on all flesh” does not treat the Spirit as God the Spirit but as a material thing like water. If the Spirit is not treated as God the Spirit, it is impossible understand the Holy Spirit. The words “the outpouring of the Spirit” and “The Spirit is now poured out on all flesh” are from the mistranslation of Acts 2:17-18. It should be “the outpouring of the gift of the Spirit,” and “the gift of the Spirit is now poured out on all flesh.”

Chuck Smith himself is in great confusion.

The Lord continues to pour out His Spirit “upon” us. He begins to overflow from us. The Jews who came with Peter were surprised that the gift of the Holy Spirit was poured out upon the gentiles. (Chuck Smith, Living Water, p.262,265.)

     In this note (“The Lord continues to pour out His Spirit upon us.”) the Spirit is not treated as God the Spirit but a material thing like water. It should speak of how the Lord continues to pour out the gift of His Spirit upon us. In the note “the gift of the Holy Spirit was poured out upon the gentiles,” the Holy Spirit is honored as God the Spirit. This note indicates that Chuck Smith himself is in great confusion. The reason that he is in confusion is that he accepted the mistranslation of Acts 2: 17-18 as authentic.

Charles Spurgeon comments on Acts 2:17.  

In a few more years, I know not when, and I know not how, the Holy Spirit will be poured out in a far different style from the present. (Charles Spurgeon, Holy Spirit Power, New Kensington: Whittaker House, 1996, p.48.)

     “The Holy Spirit will be poured out” is quite erroneous since it is based on the mistranslation and misinterpretation of Acts 2:17-18. It should be “the gift of the Holy Spirit will be poured out.”

The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary comments on Acts 2:17.  

Now the Spirit shall be poured out, not only on the Jews, but on all people, Gentiles as well as Jews. (The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary, p.450.)

     The note “the Spirit shall be poured out, not only on the Jews, but on all people” is erroneous because the Spirit is not treated as God the Spirit. It also is based on the mistranslation and misinterpretation of Acts 2:17-18. It should be that the gift of the Spirit shall be poured out, not only on the Jews, but also on all people.”

The Wycliffe Bible Commentary comments on Acts 2:17.

The pouring out of the Holy Ghost was expected to be a feature of Messianic times (Joel 2:28-29; Acts 1:5; 2:4, 16-21). (Edited by Everett F. Harrison (New Testament), The Wycliffe Bible Commentary, Chicago: Moody Press, 1979, p.990.)

     The note “The pouring out of the Holy Ghost” is quite erroneous since it is based on the mistranslation of Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18.

Veli-Matti Karkkainen comments on Acts 2:17.

According to the biblical promise, the Spirit will be poured out on “all flesh,” in other word, on all kinds of people, both young man and old, from all cultures and environments (Joel 2:28-29; Acts 2:17-18). (Veli-Matti Karkkainen, Pneumatology, p.147.)

     This note “the Spirit will be poured out on all flesh” is quite erroneous since it is based on the mistranslation of Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18. It should be “The gift of the Spirit will be poured out on all flesh.”

Stanley M. Horton comments on Acts 2:17.

Throughout the Bible oil continues to be an important symbol of the Holy Spirit. A comparison of the anointing of Saul and David brings out some significant likenesses and differences. In both cases God prepared Samuel in advance to do the anointing. In both cases also, God followed the symbolic action of pouring out the oil with a real outpouring of the Spirit. Not until the day of Pentecost did the Spirit come and begin the fulfillment of the prophecy of Joel by filling every believer present with the Spirit (Acts 2:4,16). The Spirit will be poured in the same rich abundance on servants (slaves) and handmaidens (female slaves). The abundant outpouring of the Spirit is thus available for all. The baptism in the Holy Spirit is, of course, the fulfillment of the promises to pour out the Spirit (Joel 2:28, Isaiah 44:3; Ezekiel 36:26; 39:29). But John adds a new thought not mentioned in the Old Testament. The Spirit is not only to be poured out upon them; they are to be immersed in Him, saturated with Him. Through the Old Testament indicates the Father pours out the Spirit, not only on men, but also the Messiah. They were all filled with the Holy Spirit (2:4). It was a pouring out of the Spirit upon them, as Joel prophesied (2:28-32). It was a receiving (an active taking) of a gift (2:38); a falling upon (8:10; 10:44; 11:16); a pouring out of the Gift (10:45); and a coming upon (19:6). Some suppose the facts the Spirit came upon the Gentiles while Peter was still preaching means that their conversion experience and the outpouring of the Spirit were one and the same thing. We have seen, however, that at Pentecost and at Samaria, the recipients of the gift were already believers before the Spirit was outpoured on them. In every aspect of the life of the Christian, the Spirit points us to Jesus and pours out the love of God into our hearts. (Stanley M. Horton, What the Bible says about the Holy Spirit, p.42,44,29,56-57,84,106,138-139,157,256.)

     Horton’s statements are mixtures of correct and incorrect elements. In several instances (“...a real outpouring of the Spirit…The Spirit will be poured in the same rich abundance…The abundant outpouring of the Spirit...The promises to pour out the Spirit...The Father pours out the Spirit.”), Horton is in great error because the Spirit is not honored as God the Spirit but as a material like oil or water. In the note “God followed the symbolic action of pouring out the oil with a real out- pouring of the Spirit,” the words “pouring out the oil” make sense but “outpouring of the Spirit” does not make sense since the Spirit is not treated as God. Both “pouring out of the gift” and “the Spirit pours out the love of God into our hearts” make sense since the Spirit is treated as God the Holy Spirit.
     Let’s examine the difference between “pour out something” and “pour out of some thing.” For one instance, “the congregation poured out of the church” is quite distinct from “the congregation poured out the church.” To say “The congregation poured out of or departed from the church building” makes sense but “the congregation poured out the church” makes no sense at all. Likewise, “The Father pours out of the Spirit” is quite distinct from “the Father pours out the Spirit.” “The Father pours out of the Spirit” makes sense since “poured out something” is assumed. In Acts 2:17 the term “gift” is assumed, so that it should be “I will pour out the gift of my Spirit on all flesh.”

Guy P. Duffield and N.M. Van Cleave comment on the outpouring of the Spirit.

This is not to be confused with the Baptism with the Holy Spirit, which is an out- pouring of the Spirit subsequent to salvation, and not the impartation of spiritual life, but rather power for spiritual service. The manifestation of gifts of the Spirit seems to have to do with the outpouring of the Spirit on the Day of Pentecost. (Guy P. Duffield and N.M. Van Cleave, Foundations of Pentecostal Theology, p.277,296.)

     The notes “the Baptism with the Holy Spirit is power for spiritual service and it is an outpouring of the Spirit” should read, “the Baptism of the Holy Spirit is power for spiritual service and it is an outpouring of the power of the Spirit.” If not, the Spirit is not treated as God. In the note “the manifestation of gifts of the Spirit seems to have to do with the outpouring of the Spirit,” should speak of “the outpouring of the gifts of the Spirit.” Without a single exception, the Spirit must be treated as God the Spirit and a divine Person.
 

Ernest B. Gentile comments on Acts 2:17.

Fifty days after Jesus’ crucifixion, God launched the church of Jesus Christ with a mighty outpouring of His Holy Spirit. (Ernest B. Gentile, You can have a personal Pentecost, in Charisma & Christian life, monthly magazine, July 2004, p.76.)

     The statement “a mighty outpouring of His Holy Spirit” is based upon the mistranslation of Acts 2:17-18. It should be “the outpouring of the gift or the power of the Holy Spirit.”

The Lutheran Book of Worship comments on Acts 2:17.

Athanasian Creed says, “Thus the Father is God; the Son is God; the Holy Spirit is God.” Almighty God, gracious Lord, pours out your Holy Spirit upon faithful people. Almighty God, your Holy Spirit gives to one the word of wisdom, and to another the word of knowledge, and to another the word of faith. We praise you for the gifts of grace imparted to your servant. Pour out upon us the spirit of your love. Pour out upon them the riches of your mercy. Pour out your Holy Spirit upon your people: the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and the fear of the Lord, the spirit of joy in your presence. (Lutheran Book of Worship, p.54,36,38,74,118,124)

     The Lutheran Book of Worship accepts that the Spirit is God as the Athanasian Creed does. But in the note “pour out your Spirit upon faithful people,” the Spirit is not treated as God. “Pour out upon them the riches of your mercy” is quite correct since the riches of God’s mercy can be poured out upon them. The note concerning “the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge” is thoroughly erroneous. This should speak of “the Spirit of wisdom and understanding, the Spirit of counsel and might, the Spirit of knowledge and the Spirit of joy.” It can be restated, “Almighty God, gracious Lord, pours out the gifts, that is, the wisdom and knowledge of your Spirit upon faith- ful people.”

John R. Rice comments on Acts 2:17.

I will pour out of My Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,…I will pour out in those days of My Spirit…Acts 2:17-18. It is proper, then, to say that at Pentecost God poured out His Spirit upon Christians. (John R. Rice, The power of Pentecost, Wheaton: Sword of the Lord Publisher, 1949, p.162.)

     John R. Rice accepts the translation of Acts 2:17-18, “I will pour out of My Spirit upon all flesh,” but he says that at Pentecost God poured out His Spirit upon Christians. John R. Rice mistakenly identifies “I will pour out of My Spirit” with “God poured out His Spirit.” It should be understood that the phrase “God poured out His Spirit” is quite distinct from “God poured out of His Spirit.” The note “God poured out His Spirit” is thoroughly unbiblical because His Spirit is not treated as God and a divine Person.
     In the phrase “God poured out of His Spirit,” we can assume some word is omitted. Luke assumed that his readers would un- derstand God poured out the gift of His Spirit, that is, the gift of the prophecy of the Holy Spirit. The phrase “your sons and your daughters shall prophesy” speaks of the gift of prophecy through the power of the Holy Spirit.

Joel 2:28-29 must be examined to understand Acts 2:17-18.

Joel 2:28-29(Joel 3:1-2) ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου...ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου (LXT)
BGT    ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου...ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου
MGK  ἐκχέει τὸ πνεῦμά μου...ἐκχέει τὸ πνεῦμά μου.
GWN   I will pour my Spirit..................I will pour my Spirit.
LXE     I will pour out of my Spirit…...I will pour out of my Spirit.
DBY    I will pour out my Spirit…........I will pour out my Spirit.
JPS      I will pour out My spirit…….... I will pour out My spirit.
KJV     I will pour out my spirit….........I will pour out my spirit.
NAS    I will pour out My Spirit…..…..I will pour out My Spirit.
NIV     I will pour out my Spirit.............I will pour out my Spirit.
TNIV   I will pour out my Spirit............I will pour out my Spirit.
NKJ     I will pour out My Spirit……....I will pour out My Spirit.
NLT    I will pour out my Spirit….........I will pour out my Spirit
NRS    I will pour out my spirit…..........I will pour out my spirit.
YLT     I do pour out My Spirit…..…....I do pour out My Spirit.

     The translations of the LXT and BGT are the same regarding Acts 2:17-18. Here, ekcheo apo tou pneumatos mou (ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου) of Joel  2:28-29 must be translated as “I will pour out of my Spirit” just as we find in the LXE. The phrase “I will pour out of my Spirit” is quite distinct from “I will pour out My Spirit.” “I will pour out My Spirit” is a mistranslation since the Spirit is not treated as God the Spirit. The translations of Joel 2:28-29 of all English versions except the LXE are erroneous. “I will pour out my spirit” also is thoroughly erroneous since “my spirit” must be “my Spirit.”

Acts 2:17-18 must be the same record as Joel 2:28-29 since it is from Joel 2:28-29.

Acts 2:17-18 ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου ἐπὶ πᾶσαν σάρκα ...ἐπὶ τοὺς δούλους μου καὶ ἐπὶ τὰς δούλας...ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου  (BNT)
KJV      I will pour out of my Spirit on all flesh; And on My menservants and on my maidservants I will pour out in those days of My Spirit;
NKJ      I will pour out of My Spirit on all flesh; And on My menservants and on My maidservants I will pour out My Spirit in those days;
KJV      I will pour out of my Spirit……...I will pour out of my Spirit.
NKJ      I will pour out of My Spirit……...I will pour out My Spirit.
CJB       I will pour out from my Spirit......will I pour out from my Spirit.
GWN    I will pour my Spirit......................I will pour my Spirit.
YLT      I will pour out of My Spirit……...I will pour out of My Spirit.
RWB     I will pour out of my Spirit……...I will pour out of my Spirit.
WEB     I will pour out of my Spirit……...I will pour out of my Spirit.
NAS      I will pour forth of My Spirit........I will pour forth of My Spirit.
NIV      I will pour out my Spirit………....I will pour out my Spirit.
NIRV    I will pour out my Spirit................I will pour out my Spirit.
TNIV    I will pour out my Spirit………....I will pour out my Spirit.
NAB     I will pour out a portion of my spirit…I will pour out a portion.
NEB     I will pour out upon everyone a portion of my spirit.
NJB      I shall pour out my Spirit………....I shall pour out my Spirit.
NLT     I will pour out my Spirit……..........I will pour out my Spirit.
NRS     I will pour out my Spirit……..........I will pour out my Spirit.

     As noted above, every English version except the LXE translates Joel 2:28-29 as “I will pour out my Spirit…I will pour out my Spirit.” The DBY, KJV, YLT, RWB, and WEB translate Acts 2:17-18, “I will pour out of my Spirit…I will pour out of my Spirit.” By this it is noted that these translations of Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18 are in great confusion. These passages (Joel 2:28-29; Acts 2:17-18) must be consistent since both are the word of God. The phrase “I will pour out of My Spirit” is quite distinct from “I will pour out my Spirit.” The first phrasing fails to treat the Spirit as God the Spirit but as water. In the phrase “I will pour out of My Spirit,” some word is assumed. God will pour out something. In this case, “My Spirit” is God the Holy Spirit and a proper noun, but in the case of “I will pour out My Spirit,” “My Spirit’ is used as a material noun like water or an abstract noun like power. The Greek text has the preposition apo which means “from (of).” It must be translated as “from (of).”

Joel 2:28-29   I will pour out my spirit………..........I will pour out my spirit. (KJV)
                       I will pour out My Spirit……….........I will pour out My Spirit. (NKJ)
Author            I will pour out of (from) My Spirit….I will pour out of (from) My Spirit

Acts 2:17-18   I will pour out of My Spirit.................I will pour out of My Spirit. (KJV)
                        I will pour out of My Spirit.................I will pour out My Spirit. (NKJ)
Author             I will pour out of (from) My Spirit…..I will pour out of (from) My Spirit.

     As noted above, both the KJV and NKJ inconsistently translate Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18. The KJV translates Acts 2:17 consistently with Acts 2:18. The NKJ is not consistent. The NKJ Greek English Interlinear New Testament (Features Word Studies & New King James Parallel Text) translates the term apo in Acts 2:17-18 as “from,” but the NKJ omitted apo in Acts 2:18. This translation is ridiculous. In fact most English versions have taken away the Greek preposition apo in Acts 2:17-18 because it seems to make no sense. The result is a serious mistranslation. The original Greek must be literally translated without ignoring apo. The result  must be, “I will pour out of My Spirit,” or “I will pour out from My Spirit” just as the Greek text indicates. If it is translated literally as the Greek text, “I will pour out of (from) My Spirit,” it may seem to make no sense, but it really does. Some word is omitted and assumed to be understood just as in Matt.10:29. Some word must be found. In Acts 2:17-18,33, the NAS used the words “pour forth,” but in Acts 10:45, Rom. 5:5 and Titus 3:6 “pour out” are used.

The term “gift” is omitted in Acts 2:17-18 and Joel 2:28-29.

     Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18 reveal that “Your sons and daughters will pro- phesy, your young men will see visions, your old men will dream dreams.” All these imply the giving of the gift of prophecy by the Holy Spirit (1 Cor. 12:10). It can be seen that “gift” is omitted in Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18. Now, Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18 must be translated and interpreted, “I will pour out (the gift) of my Spirit on all flesh” (Author). Then, this makes perfect sense. The NIV, TNIV and TEV took away the word “ek-of” in John 6:26, and also the word “apo-of (from)” in Acts 2:17-18. The principle of translation that all translators applied to Matt. 10:29 is not applied to Acts 2:17-18 and Acts 2:4.
     The same principle of the translation of the Bible must be applied uniformly and without exception. Inconsistencies in translation cause great confusion and mislead the seekers of truth. An accurate translation is of paramount importance. Since Acts 2:17-18 is derived directly from Joel 2:28-29, both translations must be consistent. They have the same meaning because the OT and NT are not two books but one. They are God’s unique and holy Word. All English versions have translated Acts 2:17-18 and Joel 2:28-29 inconsistently. Both must be correctly translated for the sake of consistency and sensibility.    

The Greek verb ekcheo (ἐκχεῶ, pour out) requires an accusative noun.

Acts 2:17-18 ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου ἐπὶ πᾶσαν σάρκα ...ἐπὶ τοὺς δούλους μου καὶ ἐπὶ τὰς δούλας...ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου  (BNT)
KJV    I will pour out of my Spirit on all flesh…on My menservants I will pour out of my Spirit…   
 
     According to the text, the Greek ekcheo (ἐκχεῶ, pour out) is in an accusative verb, and tou pneumatos mou (τοῦ πνεύματός μου, of my Spirit, of the Spirit) is in a genitive noun. The KJV translates the Greek genitive preposition apo (ἀπὸ) as “of.” The translation of Acts 2:17-18 of the KJV is correct. Since the accusative verb “pour out” always requires an accusative noun, we must conclude that some accusative noun has been omitted. We know God intends to pour out “something” of His Spirit upon all flesh. Here, the KJV accepts the Spirit as God the Spirit who is a proper noun. The principle of translation applied to Acts 2:17-18, [accusative verb + accusative noun + genitive preposition + genitive noun] must likewise be applied to the construction of Titus   3:5 which is incorrectly translated by all English versions.
     The NEB translates Acts 2:17, “I will pour out upon everyone a portion of my spirit. I will endue even my slave, both men and women, with a portion of my spirit.” But “my spirit” does not mean “my Spirit,” since the Spirit is quite different from “my spirit.” The NEB translates 1 Cor. 12:13b as “one Holy Spirit was poured out for all of us to drink.” In this translation the Holy Spirit is not treated as God. Thus, the translation of the NEB is quite erroneous. The NAB translates Acts 2:17, “I will pour out a portion of my spirit upon all flesh...I will pour out a portion of my spirit in those days.” The NAB translates Titus 3:5-6 as “He saved us through the bath of rebirth and renewal by the holy Spirit, whom he richly poured out on us.” Here “the holy Spirit” means God the Holy Spirit, but in the same construction of Acts 2:17-18, “my spirit” does not mean God the Holy Spirit and a divine Person. the NAB translates inconsistently. If Rom. 5:5 is not carefully examined, it is absolutely impossible to translate and interpret Acts 2:17-18.

Rom. 5:5 must be examined to translate and understand Acts 2:17-18.

Rom 5:5 ἡ ἀγάπη τοῦ θεοῦ ἐκκέχυται ἐν ταῖς καρδίαις ἡμῶν διὰ πνεύματος ἁγίου τοῦ  (BNT)
DBY      the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Spirit.
KJV       the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost.
NAB      the love of God has been poured out…through the holy Spirit.
NAS       the love of God has been poured out…through the Holy Spirit.
NIV       God has poured out his love into our hearts by the Holy Spirit.
TNIV     God’s love has been poured out... through the Holy Spirit.
NET       the love of God has been poured out...through the Holy Spirit.
NJB       the love of God has been poured…by the Holy Spirit.
NKJ       the love of God has been poured out…by the Holy Spirit.
NLT       he has given us the Holy Spirit to fill our hearts with his love.
NRS      God’s love has been poured…through the Holy Spirit.
RSV      God’s love has been poured…through the Holy Spirit.
RWB     the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Spirit.
WEB     the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts, by the Holy Spirit.
YLT      the love of God hath been poured forth…through the Holy Spirit.

The love of God has been poured out by the Holy Spirit.......passive voice
The Holy Spirit has poured out the love of God.....................active voice

     In Rom. 5:5 the text ekkechutai (ἐκκέχυται, passive,  ἀπὸ, pour out) is in a passive voice. If it were translated in the active voice, it would read, “The Holy Spirit has poured out the love of God into our hearts.” If Acts 2:17 (“I will pour out my Spirit”) were changed into a passive voice, it would read, “My Spirit will be poured out by God.” In that case “My Spirit” is not honored as God the Spirit. So that it is affirmed that, “I will pour out my Spirit” is an erroneous translation. Examine the phrase “I will pour out of my Spirit.” This is impossible to change into a passive voice, but if the omitted word (“gift”) were added, it would read correctly, “I will pour out the gift of my Spirit.” As the result it could be changed into the passive to read, “The gift of the Spirit will be poured out by God.” This makes sense because the Spirit is treated as God the Spirit. Then, the meaning of Acts 2:17 becomes simple to find.
     The Greek verb ekkechutai (ἐκκέχυται, to be poured) which is in the accusative requires an accusative noun. In Rom. 5:5, the accusative noun is “the love of God,” but there is no the accusative noun in Acts 2:17. Instead, there is only the Greek preposition apo (of or from) and a genitive pneumatos (πνεύματος). So Acts 2:17 must be translated just as the KJV does. When the preposition apo (of or from) in Acts 2:17-18 is taken away to “clarify” the text it makes no sense at all. Therefore, it must be translated, “I will pour out of (from) my Spirit on all flesh” just as the Greek text dictates.

Sinclair B. Ferguson insists that the Spirit is poured out into our hearts through faith.

Rather, we enter into it in such a way that the Spirit is poured out into our hearts through faith in Christ (cf. Rom 5:5). (Sinclair B. Ferguson, The Holy Spirit, p.86.)

     The note, “the Spirit is poured out into our hearts through faith in Christ” (cf. Rom. 5:5), is quite erroneous since it is based on the misunderstanding of Rom. 5:5. The text says that the love of God has been poured out in our hearts by the Holy Spirit who was given to us (NKJ). The text does not support Sinclair B. Ferguson’s argument. It can be changed into the active voice: “the Holy Spirit has poured out the love of God into our hearts through faith in Christ” (cf. Rom. 5:5). It confirms that “the Holy Spirit has been poured out” is quite erroneous.  
 

Acts 10:45 must be examined to translate and understand Acts 2:17-18.

Acts 10:45 ἐπὶ τὰ ἔθνη ἡ δωρεὰ τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος ἐκκέχυται· (BNT)
KJV     on the Gentiles also was poured out the gift of the Holy Ghost.
NKJ     the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on the Gentiles.
NIV     the gift of the Holy Spirit had been pou

red out even on the Gentiles.

     The text can be simply summarized, “The gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on them.” Acts 10:45 which is in the passive voice can be changed into the active voice: “God had poured out the gift of the Spirit on them.” Acts 10:45 must be consistent with Acts 2:17. Acts 10:45 confirms that Acts 2:17 must be translated and interpreted, “I will pour out of my Spirit on all flesh,” or “I will pour out the gift of my Spirit on all flesh.” The promise of God in Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18 was fulfilled in Acts 2:4 and 10:45.

“Whom or which” in Titus 3:6 is a mistranslation. It must be “of whom.”

Titus 3;5-6 ἀνακαινώσεως πνεύματος ἁγίου, οὗ ἐξέχεεν ἐφ᾽ ἡμᾶς πλουσίως διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ σωτῆρος ἡμῶν, (BNT)
NKJ         renewing of the Holy Spirit, whom He poured out on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Savior.
CSB         renewal by the Holy Spirit. This Spirit He poured out on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Savior,
DBY        renewal of the Holy Spirit, which he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Saviour;
GNV        renewing of the holy Ghost, Which he shed on us abundantly, through Jesus Christ our Saviour,
KJV         renewing of the Holy Ghost; Which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour;
NAB        renewal by the holy Spirit, whom he richly poured out on us through Jesus Christ our savior,
NAS        renewing by the Holy Spirit, whom He poured out upon us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior,
NIV         renewal by the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior,
TNIV       renewal by the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior,
NJB         renewal in the Holy Spirit, which he has so generously poured over us through Jesus Christ our Saviour;
NKJ         renewing of the Holy Spirit, whom He poured out on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Savior,
NLT        new life through the Holy Spirit. He generously poured out the Spirit upon us because of what Jesus Christ our Savior did.
NRS        renewal by the Holy Spirit. This Spirit he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior,
RSV        renewal in the Holy Spirit, which he poured out upon us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior,
NET        the renewing of the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us in full measure through Jesus Christ our Savior.
YLT        renewing of the Holy Spirit, which He poured upon us richly through Jesus Christ our Saviour,

     The translations of Titus 3:5-6 mentioned above can be summarized as follows:

•    renewing of the Holy Spirit, which he poured on us abundantly
•    renewing of the Holy Spirit, whom He poured out on us abundantly
•    renewal by the Holy Spirit. This Spirit he poured out on us richly
•    life through the Holy Spirit. He generously poured out the Spirit upon us

     The Greek relative pronoun hos, (he, ho, οὗ, ος, who, which, what, that) in Titus 3:6 should be not translated as the accusative “whom or which” but as the genitive “of whom.” If “whom” were acceptable, it will read, “God poured out the Holy Spirit on us abundantly.” Then, it makes no sense since the Holy Spirit is treated as an abstract noun like love or a material noun like water. Therefore, the word “whom” is erroneous. It should be “of whom.” The text should be translated and interpreted, “He poured out of the Holy Spirit on us abundantly,” that is, “He poured out the gift of the Holy Spirit on us abundantly.” Titus 3:5-6 is exactly consistent with Acts 2:17-18.

John F. MacArthur accepts the mistranslation of Titus 3:5-6 as authentic.

Titus 3:5-6 says, “He saved us, not no the basis of deeds which we have done in righteousness, but according to His mercy, by the washing of regeneration and renewing by the Holy Spirit, whom He poured out us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior.” God sovereignly pours out the Holy Spirit on those He saves. (John F. MacArthur, The MacArthur New Testament Commentary Acts 1-12, p.18.)

     John MacArthur’s note indicates that he accepts the mistranslation of Titus 3:5-6 as authentic. His conclusion, based on the mistranslation of the English version, is quite erroneous since the Holy Spirit is not treated as God and a divine Person. It must read, “of whom He poured out us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior.” It can be concluded that God sovereignly pours out (the gift) of the Holy Spirit on those He saves. If the Holy Spirit is not treated as God, it is impossible to translate, interpret and understand the Holy Spirit of the OT and NT.

John R. W. Stott comments on “God abundantly poured out the Spirit upon us.”

We could sum it up by saying that these penitent believers received the gift of the Spirit which God had promised before the day of Pentecost, and were thus baptized with the Spirit whom God poured out on the day of Pentecost. When sinners repent and believe, Jesus not only takes away their sins but also baptizes them with his Spirit. Indeed, as Paul put it in dramatic terms to Titus, when God saves he not only ‘justifies’ us by his grace but also gives us a certain ‘washing’ or ‘bath.’ If, as is probable, this is a reference to water-baptism, then it indicates what water-baptism signifies. For Paul describes it by a remarkable, composite expression. It is a bath of rebirth and renewal of (i.e. by) the Holy Spirit whom he abundantly poured out upon us through Jesus Christ our Savior (3:4-7, literally). So the outpoured Spirit to regenerate and renew us is again seen to be part of our salvation. (John R. W. Stott, Baptism & Fullness, p.25,26.)

     These erroneous notes are based on the mistranslation of Acts 2:17-18 and Titus 3:5-6. The sentence, “They were thus baptized with the Spirit whom God poured out on the day of Pentecost and they were thus baptized with the Spirit on the day of Pentecost,” is a mixture of correct and incorrect elements. To speak of “the Spirit whom God poured out on the day of Pentecost” is quite erroneous. This thought is based on the mistranslation of Acts 2:17-18. It must be remembered that God poured out the gift of the Spirit on the day of Pentecost. The comment “When sinners repent and believe, Jesus not only takes away their sins but also baptizes them with his Spirit” is quite erroneous. No scriptural reference says so, but this kind of argument is from the mistranslation of 1 Cor. 12:13 and misunderstanding of the relation between the baptism of the Holy Spirit and the fullness of the power of the Holy Spirit. (See the detailed discussion on “the relation between the baptism of the Holy Spirit and the fullness of the power of the Holy Spirit.”)

     The note, “It is a bath of rebirth and renewal of (i.e. by) the Holy Spirit whom he abundantly poured out upon us through Jesus Christ our Savior” also is quite erroneous. It should read instead, “It is a bath of rebirth and renewal of (i.e. by) the Holy Spirit and He abundantly poured out His gift upon us through Jesus Christ our Savior.” The note, “So the outpoured Spirit to regenerate and renew us is again seen to be part of our salvation,” is quite erroneous. For instance, the 120 disciples were regenerated and renewed and saved by the Holy Spirit (John 3:5-8) before the actual outpouring of the gift of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. The term “the outpoured Spirit” is from the mistranslations and misinterpretations of Joel 2:28-29, Acts 2:17-18 and Titus 3:5-6. It should refer to “the outpouring of the gift of the Holy Spirit” or “the outpoured gift of the Holy Spirit.”

The verb “pour out” must not follow the proper noun but material or abstract noun.

1 Kin. 18:33 Fill four large jars with water and pour it on the offering. (NIV)
Is. 44:3      I will pour water on the thirsty land. (NIV)
                  I will pour out water on the thirsty land. (NAS)
Jer. 10:25  Pour out your wrath on the nations. (NIV)

     The verb “pour out” requires an abstract or material noun. By no means can an individual name follow. For instance, 1 Kings  18:33, Is. 44:3a and Jer. 10:25 indicate the proper usage of “pour out.”

Pour water on the offering and on the wood……...Everyone says it makes sense.
I will pour out water on the thirsty land………......Everyone says it makes sense.
Pour out your wrath on the nations…………….....Everyone says it makes sense.
God will pour out the Spirit on you………...….....Everyone says it makes sense.
God will pour out Jesus Christ on you……............Everyone says it makes no sense.
God will pour out the gift of the Spirit on you…...Everyone says it makes sense.
     Christians are possessed of great contradictions and misunderstandings regar- ding the usage of the term “pour out” in the OT and NT. Does the phrase, “God will pour out Jesus Christ on you” make sense? No. Likewise, “God will pour out the Spirit on you” makes no sense since the Spirit is a proper name, just as is the name of Jesus. Without a single exception, the Spirit must be regarded as God the Spirit. If this doctrine is accepted as accurate, the phrase “pour out of (from) the Spirit” can be understood.  
    

Isaiah 32:15; 44:3 must be consistent with Joel 2:28-29.

Is 32:15 ἕως ἂν ἐπέλθῃ ἐφ᾽ ὑμᾶς πνεῦμα ἀφ᾽ ὑψηλοῦ καὶ ἔσται ἔρημος ὁ Χερμελ καὶ ὁ Χερμελ εἰς δρυμὸν λογισθήσεται (LXT)
LXE   until the Spirit shall come upon you from on high, and Chermel shall be desert, and Chermel shall be counted for a forest.
NIV    till the Spirit is poured upon us from on high, and the desert becomes a fertile field, and the fertile field seems like a forest.
NKJ    Until the Spirit is poured upon us from on high, and the wilderness becomes a fruitful field, And the fruitful field is counted as a forest.
 
Is. 42:1  Here is my servant, whom I uphold, my chosen one in whom I delight; I will put my Spirit on him and he will bring justice to the nations. (NIV)
NKJ    Behold! My Servant whom I uphold, My Elect One in whom My soul delights! I have put My Spirit upon Him; He will bring forth justice to the Gentiles.

Is. 44:3 For I will pour water on the thirsty land, and streams on the dry ground; I will pour out my Spirit on your offspring, and my blessing on your descendants. (NIV)
NKJ     For I will pour water on him who is thirsty, and floods on the dry ground; I will pour My Spirit on your descendants, And My blessing on your offspring.
LXE    For I will give water to the thirsty that walk in a dry land: I will put my Spirit upon thy seed, and my blessings upon thy children:

Ezek. 39:29  I will no longer hide my face from them, for I will pour out my Spirit on the house of Israel, declares the Sovereign Lord. (NIV)
NKJ      And ‘I will not hide My face from them anymore; for I shall have poured out My Spirit on the house of Israel,’ says the Lord God.

     The passages mentioned above can be summarized as follows:

I will pour water on the thirsty land.....................................It makes sense.
I will pour out my blessing on your descendants.................It makes sense.
The Spirit is poured upon us from on high,..........................It makes no sense.
Water is poured upon us from on high,................................It makes sense.
The gift of the Spirit is poured upon us from on high,.........It makes sense.
I have put My Spirit upon Him.............................................It makes sense.
The Spirit shall come upon you from on high……………..It makes sense.

     As already noted and without a single exception, the Spirit must be treated as God. According to the doctrine of the Trinity, the phrase “I will pour out my Spirit on you” can be changed to read:

I will pour out Jesus Christ on you........................................It makes no sense.
I will pour out God on you....................................................It makes no sense.
I will pour out my Spirit on you............................................It makes no sense.
I will pour out of my Spirit on you........................................It makes sense.
I will pour out the gift of my Spirit on you...........................It makes sense.

     It can only be concluded that the phrase, “the Spirit is poured upon us, or I will pour My Spirit on your descendants” (Isaiah 32:15; 44:3; Ezek. 39:29) is from the erroneous manuscripts. These passages must speak of the Spirit as God, and they must be consistent with Joel 2:28-29 and Acts 2:17-18 since they are part of God’s eternal words.

John F. MacArthur comments on Acts 2:32-33.

In his sermon on the day of Pentecost, Peter said of Christ, “Therefore having been exalted to the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, He has poured forth this which you both see and hear” (Acts 2:33). Again, we see Christ as the baptizer, who “pours forth” the Spirit in the miraculous events of Pentecost. (John F. MacArthur, Charismatic Chaos, p.232.)

     MacArthur interprets, “He has poured forth this which you both see and hear” (Acts 2:33) and Christ pours forth the Spirit.” This is an incorrect interpretation. The note, “He has poured forth this which you both see and hear” (Acts 2:33) is correct, but to speak of “Christ as the baptizer, who ‘pours forth’ the Spirit” is quite erroneous. MacArthur teaches that the Spirit is represented as “this which you both see and hear.” But the Spirit is by no means “this which you both see and hear.” Instead, the phrase signifies the visible and vocal manifestation of the in- visible Spirit, that is, the gift of tongues  (Acts 2:4b). So the note, “we see Christ as the baptizer, who ‘pours forth’ the Spirit in the miraculous events of Pentecost,” is quite erroneous. It should read, “We see Christ as the baptizer, who pours out the gift of the Spirit in the miraculous events of Pentecost.”

Acts 2:33 must be carefully examined to translate and understand Acts 2:17-18.

Acts 2:33 τῇ δεξιᾷ οὖν τοῦ θεοῦ ὑψωθείς, τήν τε ἐπαγγελίαν τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ ἁγίου λαβὼν παρὰ τοῦ πατρός, ἐξέχεεν τοῦτο ὃ ὑμεῖς [καὶ] βλέπετε καὶ ἀκούετε.(BNT)
KJV    Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.
NKJ    Therefore being exalted to the right hand of God, and having re- ceived from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, He poured out this which you now see and hear.
NIV     Exalted to the right hand of God, he has received from the Father the promised Holy Spirit and has poured out what you now see and hear.
NAS    Being therefore exalted at the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, he has poured out this that you both see and hear.
NLT    the Father, as he had promised, gave him the Holy Spirit to pour out upon us, just as you see and hear today.

     “The promise of the Holy Spirit” is correct, but “the promised Holy Spirit” is a mistranslation. In ten epaggelian tou pneumatos (τήν τε ἐπαγγελίαν τοῦ πνεύματος), ten epaggelian (τήν ἐπαγγελίαν, promise) is in the noun and tou pneumatos (τοῦ πνεύματος, of the Spirit) is in the genitive. So it must not be “the promised Spirit” but “the promise of the Spirit.” The phrase “what or this which you now see and hear” testifies of the gift of tongues given by the Holy Spirit written in Acts 2:4b. Here, “what or this which you now see and hear” does by no means imply “the Holy Spirit” because He cannot be a “what or which.” He is God the Holy Spirit. MacArthur’s argument “we see Christ as the baptizer, who ‘pours forth’ the Spirit” springs from a mistranslation.
     The phrase, “He poured out this which you now see and hear” should be understood as, “Jesus poured out the gift of the Holy Spirit.” Acts 2:33 says, “He poured out this which you now see and hear.” And Acts 2:17-18 says, “God will pour out of the Holy Spirit.” Here, it can be concluded that what is poured out is the gift of the Holy Spirit, for instance, the gift of tongues or the gift of prophecy (I Cor. 12:7-10).

Acts 1:4-2:39 describes the one story of the facts occurred at Pentecost.

Acts  1:5    For John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit. (NIV)
Acts  1:8    you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria and to the ends of the earth. (NIV)
Acts 2:3-4  They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them. (NIV)
Acts  2:11-18  we hear them declaring the wonders of God in our own tongues! Amazed and perplexed, they asked one another, “What does this mean?” Some, however, made fun of them and said, “They have had too much wine.” Then Peter stood up with the Eleven, raised his voice and addressed the crowd: Fellow Jews and all of you who live in Jerusalem, let me explain this to you; listen carefully to what I say. These men are not drunk, as you suppose. It’s only nine in the morning! No, this is what was spoken by the prophet Joel: In the last days, God says, I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy, your young men will see visions, your old men will dream dreams. Even on my servants, both men and women, I will pour out my Spirit in those days, and they will prophesy. (NIV)

     Acts 1:4-2:39 relate the facts relative to the day of Pentecost. After receiving the baptism of the Holy Spirit, that is, the fullness of the power of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost, Peter addressed crowds staying in Jerusalem. Acts 2:14-34 tells how Peter preached when he was filled with the power of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. In this story we can discover the following doctrines of the Holy Spirit:

They received the power of the Spirit when He came on them.
They were filled with of the Spirit when He came on them.
They were filled with the power of the Spirit when He came on them.
They were filled with the gift of the Spirit when He came on them.
They began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them.
They received the gift of tongues of the Spirit.
The gift of the Spirit has been poured out on them when He came on them.  
God the Father poured out the gift of the Spirit on them through the Spirit.
Jesus poured out the gift of the Spirit on them through the Spirit sent by Jesus.
The Spirit sent by Jesus poured out the gift of the Spirit on them.

     These conclusions are all valid without contradiction and confusion. They are found within the context of the pouring out of the gift (power) of the Spirit at Pen- tecost (Acts  1:4-2:39).

Isaiah 29:9-10 must be examined to understand Acts 2:17-18.

Is. 29:9-10  Be stunned and amazed, blind yourselves and be sightless; be drunk, but not from wine, stagger, but not from beer. The Lord has brought over you a deep sleep: He has sealed your eyes (the prophets); he has covered your heads (the seers). (NIV)
NKJ    Pause and wonder! Blind yourselves and be blind! They are drunk, but not with wine; they stagger, but not with intoxicating drink. For the Lord has poured out on you the spirit of deep sleep, and has closed your eyes, namely, the prophets; And He has covered your heads, namely, the seers.

     The phrase, “The Lord has poured out on you the spirit of deep sleep” (NKJ) in Isaiah 29:9-10, is from a mistranslation because of the following reasons. To teach that “the Lord pours out the Spirit” makes no sense because the Spirit is not treated as God the Spirit but a material like water. For instance, “the Lord pours out water” is logical, and if it were said, “The Lord pours out the water of the Spirit,” that too would be accurate. So Isaiah 29:9-10 are to be translated and interpreted, “the Lord has poured out the deep sleep of the Spirit on you.”
     The words, “the Spirit of deep sleep,” imply that the Spirit makes or gives a deep sleep. So it can be said that it is the deep sleep of the Spirit or it is the deep sleep given by the Spirit. If the deep sleep of the Spirit were poured out on the disciples, they would certainly seem to be drunk with wine. They were not drunk with wine or any intoxicating drink. It seemed to some the disciples were drunk. Instead, they were receiving the deep sleep of the Spirit, that is, the deep sleep given by the Spirit. Acts 2:4 says, “They were filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit, and spoke in tongues.” Therefore, the record of Acts 2:3-33 is the same as that of Isaiah 29:9-10. All these facts confirm that Acts 2:17 must be translated and interpreted, “I will pour out of (from) my Spirit on all flesh” or “I will pour out the gift of my Spirit on all flesh.”