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All scholars insist to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.

 

Billy Graham insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

When were you baptized with the Holy Spirit? He asked. He had not questioned the others on this. The moment I received Jesus Christ as my Savior, l replied. Since the baptism with the Spirit occurs at time of regeneration, Christians are never told in Scripture to seek it. The moment we received Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior we received the Holy Spirit. He came to live in out heart. “Any one who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him,” said Paul in Romans 8:9. It was correct for me to respond that I had already received the baptism of the Spirit at the moment of my conversion. (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, p.69,79-80.)

     Billy Graham insists, “To receive Jesus Christ is to receive the Holy Spirit, to have the Spirit of Christ is belong to Jesus Christ, and to receive Jesus Christ is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit. To receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” In the statement, “To receive Jesus Christ is to receive the Spirit, to have the Spirit of Christ is belong to Jesus Christ” is correct. But writing, “to receive Jesus Christ is to be baptized with the Spirit. To receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit” is quite erroneous. It is from the mistranslation of the Greek verb lambano.

John R. W. Stott insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

All Christians receive the Spirit at the very beginning of their Christian life. This truth is confirmed by the New Testament use of the expression ‘baptism of the Spirit’ as an equivalent to ‘gift of the Spirit,’ or rather of the verb (for the expression is always verbal) to ‘baptize’ or ‘be baptized with the Holy Spirit.’ The very concept of ‘baptism’ is initiatory. Moreover, there can be no doubt that Cornelius’ baptism with the Spirit was initiation into Christ, his conversion. The gift of the Spirit means the Holy Spirit himself. (John R. W. Stott, Baptism & Fullness, p.36-37,39.)

     John Stott insists, “All Christians receive the Spirit at the very beginning of their Christian life, that is, all Christians receive the Spirit. To receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” The note, “All Christians receive the Spirit at the very beginning of their Christian life,” is correct. But “To receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit” is from the mistranslation of the Greek lambano.

Martyn Lloyd-Jones insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

In Acts 8 the Samaritans were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus, then laid their hands on them, and they received the Holy Ghost. These people were already true believers on the Lord Jesus Christ and him crucified as their Saviour. They had been baptized into his name because they had become believers, but still were not baptized with the Holy Spirit. (Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Joy Unspeakable, p.28.)

     Lloyd-Jones says that the phrase “the Samaritans received the Holy Ghost” is the same meaning as “they were baptized with the Holy Spirit,” that is, “to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” Lloyd-Jones claims that the Samaritans received the Spirit, that is, received the baptism with the Spirit. This is from the mistranslation of the Greek lambano. Lloyd-Jones continues:

Ananias does not instruct Paul on the way of salvation. He is sent to heal him and to fill him with the Holy Spirit, to give him the baptism with the Holy Spirit. ‘And immediately there fell from his eyes as it had been scales: and he received sight forthwith, and arose, and was baptized.’ You can, you see, receive the Holy Spirit before you are baptized, or the other way round, it does not matter at all. (Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Ibid., p.29.)
 
     The note says that Ananias was “sent to heal Paul and to fill him with the Holy Spirit, to give him the baptism with the Holy Spirit.” In conclusion, Lloyd-Jones insists that to receive the baptism with the Holy Spirit is to receive the Holy Spirit. Lloyd-Jones continues:

It is possible for a man to be baptized with the Holy Spirit virtually simultaneous with his belief. Take care of Cornelius and his household. You remember that we are told in Acts 10 that as Peter was still speaking, the Holy Spirit fell upon them. There it seems that the baptism with Holy Spirit happened ‘as they were believing,’ ‘almost simultaneously.’…It is possible for a man to believe without receiving the Holy Spirit. (Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Ibid., p.30.)

     The note says here that the baptism with Holy Spirit means the same as ‘receiving the Holy Spirit.’ In conclusion, Lloyd-Jones insists that to receive the baptism with the Holy Spirit is to receive the Holy Spirit. Lloyd-Jones continues:

Paul said unto them, Have ye received the Holy Ghost since ye believed?...That is not the right translation. So let me give it to you in the Revised and the other translations. ‘Did you receive the Holy Ghost when you believed?’ Right; that is the correct translation and, of course, it shows that the old Authorized translation is after all not wrong: ‘Have ye received the Holy Ghost since ye believed?’ (my italics). The implication there, obviously, is, of course, that you can believe without receiving the Spirit, that it happens to you afterwards. ‘All right,’ you say, but the other is the correct translation: “Did you receive the Holy Ghost when you believed?” But what does that tell us? Well that, too, tells us that it is obvious that you can believe without receiving the Holy Spirit. (Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Ibid., p.29-30.)

     The note mentioned above says the 12 disciples at Ephesus received the Spirit by Paul. Lloyd-Jones continues:

The 12 disciples at Ephesus are true believers, children of God, but still they have not been baptized with the Holy Spirit, because we read in verse 6: ‘When Paul had laid his hands upon them, the Holy Ghost came on them; and they spake with tongues, and prophesied.’ Now there is an absolute proof that you can be a true believer in the Lord Jesus Christ and still not be baptized with the Holy Spirit; that incident proves it twice over. Twice over! The question at the beginning and what actually happened subsequently. The important point is that there is a difference, that there is a distinction between believing and being baptized with the Holy Spirit. All I am  trying to establish is this–that you can be regenerated without being baptized with the Holy Spirit. (Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Ibid., p.31-32.)

     Lloyd-Jones insists here the 12 disciples received the Holy Spirit, that is, they were baptized with the Holy Spirit by Paul after becoming true believers or children of God. In conclusion, through the records of Acts 8,9,10,19, Lloyd-Jones obviously insists that “you can believe without receiving the Holy Spirit” is the same as “you can be regenerated without being baptized with the Holy Spirit.” His opinion: “to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit and both things take place subsequent to regeneration.” Lloyd-Jones continues:

In Romans 8:9, Paul says, “Now if any man has not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of his.” So that, clearly, any man who is a Christian is a man in whom the Holy Spirit of God dwells. I take it that is therefore abundantly, clear–you cannot be a Christian without having the Holy Spirit in you. But–and here is the point–I am asserting at the same time that you can a believer, that you can have the Holy Spirit dwelling in you and still not be baptized with the Holy Spirit. Now this is the crucial issue. You cannot be a Christian at all without having the Holy Sprit in you. (Ibid., p.22-23,34.)

     In Romans 8:9, Paul says, “Now if any man has not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of his.” Every Christian has the Holy Spirit, so Lloyd-Jones rightly insists that one cannot be a Christian without having the Holy Spirit. This is biblically supported, but Romans 8:15-16 must be examined to understand Romans 8:9.
     In Romans 8:15-16, Paul says, “For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father. The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God” (KJV). These verses can be summarized, “All children of God have received the Spirit.” This truth must be applied to all children of God both in OT days and NT days. Through the records of Romans 8:15-16, it can be concluded that one cannot be a Christian without receiving the Holy Spirit; that is, a Christian receives the Holy Spirit. Through Romans 8:9 it can be concluded that one cannot be a Christian without the indwelling Holy Spirit, that is, a Christian has the Holy Spirit. It is confirmed here that the meaning of Romans 8:9 is the same as that of Romans 8:15-16. That is, the phrase “you cannot be a Christian without having the Holy Spirit,” is the same as the phrase, “you cannot be a Christian without receiving the Holy Spirit.” In the statement mentioned above, through the records of Acts 8,10,19, Lloyd-Jones insists, “It is possible for a man to believe without receiving the Holy Spirit, that is, you can believe without receiving the Holy Spirit.” Through the records of Romans 8:9, he insists, “You cannot be a Christian without having the Holy Spirit. You cannot be a Christian without receiving the Holy Spirit.”
     So it is confirmed that he himself is in great confusion. This has occurred since he has accepted the mistranslation of the Greek lambano in Acts 8,10,19. His note, “You can be a child of God and not yet be baptized with the Holy Spirit. You can be regenerated without being baptized with the Holy Spirit,” is thoroughly biblical. But he insists that “You can believe without receiving the Holy Spirit” is synonymous with “You can believe without being baptized with the Holy Spirit.” This is unbiblical and from the mistranslation of the Greek verb lambano in John 7:39, 20:22, Acts 8,10,19 and Gal. 3:2.

Michael Green insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

Once you do use the phrase in this way, you immediately find yourself in deep theological trouble. Because it is plain from such verses as Romans 8:9 that all Christians have the Spirit. How is it, then, that they have the Holy Spirit on the one hand, but have not received the baptism with the Spirit on the other? All very confusing and contradictory. (Michael Green, I believe in the Holy Spirit, p.174.)

     Michael Green asks, “How is it, then, that they have the Holy Spirit on the one hand, but have not received the baptism with the Spirit on the other?” This implies that “all Christians have the Holy Spirit” is the same as “all Christians receive the baptism with the Spirit.” Without a single exception, unfortunately, all Christian society accepts this statement as correct and biblical. But Green’s question is based on the mistranslation of the Greek lambano.

Frederick D. Bruner insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

The phrase “be baptized with the Holy Spirit” occurs on only two occasions in Acts 1:5; 11:16. The usual expression becomes very early “receive the Holy Spirit (2:38; 8:18; 10:47; 19:2). The Holy Spirit is received with the forgiveness of sins (2:38; 1 Cor 6:11; Tit, 3:5). The uniqueness of the Samaritan event is affirmed even by those who used it to teach special doctrine. The account is accentuated by two important words in verse 16. [The Spirit] had not yet fallen on any of the, but they had only been baptized. To be baptized and not to have received the Spirit was an abnormality. (Frederick D. Bruner, A Theology of the Holy Spirit, p.194,216,177.)

     Frederick D. Bruner insists, “To be baptized with the Holy Spirit is to receive the Holy Spirit.” Without a single exception, all Christian society sees this claim as correct and biblical, but it is from the mistranslation of the Greek lambano. If this verb in Acts 8:15-19 were not to be translated as “to receive” but “to be filled with,” nobody would argue that the Samaritan event was unique and abnormal, and to be baptized and not to have received the Spirit was an abnormality. Through the records of Acts 2:38, 1 Cor. 6:11 and Titus 3:5, Frederick D. Bruner claims “The Holy Spirit is received with the forgiveness of sins.” This is from a mistranslation and misinterpretation.  

John F. MacArthur insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

That the tongues rested on each one of them shows that all who were present receive the Spirit in that moment. It was a uniform, sovereign work of God on all collectively, not something sought individually. At this point, by the baptism with the Spirit, they were all made into one spiritual body-the body of Christ. Two other passages (John 7:39 and 16:7) demonstrate that the disciples did not receive the Holy Spirit until the day of Pentecost. Acts 2:3-4 records the actual reception of the Spirit. The disciples were baptized with the Spirit (verse 2-3). (John F. MacArthur, The MacArthur New Testament Commentary Acts 1-12, p.41,214-5.)

     MacArthur insists that Acts 2:3-4 records the actual reception of the Spirit, and the disciples were baptized with the Spirit (verse 2-3). Here, MacArthur insists, “To receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.” Without a single exception, all Christian society accepts this claim as authentic and biblical, but it is from the mistranslation of the Greek lambano.

Sinclair B. Ferguson insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

In Samaria and Ephesus we similarly encounter believers (i.e. people already regenerated) who have not yet received (in the sense of being baptized with) the Holy Spirit. (Sinclair B. Ferguson, The Holy Spirit, p.82.)

     Ferguson says that we encounter believers who have not yet received (in the sense of being baptized with) the Spirit. This implies that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit, but it is from the mistranslation of the Greek lambano in Acts 8:15-19 and 19:2.

R. A. Torrey insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

Here we have another expression, “filled with the Holy Spirit,” used synonymously with “baptized with the Holy Spirit.” Here Peter distinctly called the experience which came to Cornelius and his household, being baptized with the Holy Ghost. Thus we see that the expression “the Holy Ghost fell” and “the gift of the Holy Ghost” are practically synonymous with “baptized with the Holy Ghost.” Still other expressions are used to describe this blessing, such as “receive the Holy Ghost” (Acts 2:38; 19:2-6). (R. A. Torrey, The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit, p.146-7.)

     R. A. Torrey insists, “filled with the Holy Spirit” means the same as “baptized with the Holy Spirit.” On the strength of Acts 1:5,8 and Acts 2:2-4 this is correct biblical. He also insists, “to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit,” but that is from the mistranslation of the Greek verb lambano. R. A. Torrey continues:

As we have already seen, every true believer has the Holy Spirit (Rom. 8:9), but not every believer has the baptism with the Holy Spirit (though every believer may have, as we have just noted)....or else but not every believer has the baptism with the Holy Spirit. Certainly, this was the case in the early church. It was the case with the apostles before Pentecost; it was the case with the church in Ephesus; it was the case with the church in Samaria. And there are thousands today who can testify to having received Christ and been born again, and then afterwards, sometimes long afterwards, having been baptized with the Holy Ghost as a definite experience. (R. A. Torrey, Ibid., p.153.)

     R. A. Torrey insists, “Every true believer has the Holy Spirit, but not every believer has the baptism with the Holy Spirit, that is, to have the Holy Spirit is not to have the baptism with the Holy Spirit.” In the mention above, R. A. Torrey also insists, “To receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” He insists here also, “To have the Holy Spirit is not to have the baptism with the Holy Spirit.” He identifies “to be baptized with the Holy Spirit” with “to have the baptism with the Holy Spirit.” It is right, but in conclusion Torrey himself is in great confusion.Stanley M. Horton insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.

The Galatian believers received the Spirit is a definite act....It may very well be that their response of faith came during Paul’s preaching, a response not only for accepting Christ but also for receiving the baptism in the Holy Spirit. (Stanley M. Horton, What the Bible says about the Holy Spirit, p.171.)

     Stanley M. Horton insists that “the Galatian believers received the Spirit” means the same as “they received the baptism in the Holy Spirit.” Horton prefers to use the term “the baptism in the Holy Spirit” rather than the baptism of the Holy Spirit. Horton’s note “the Galatian believers received the Spirit” is from the Greek verb lambano. In conclusion, all scholars including Pentecostals and non-Pentecostals mentioned above accept that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit. Without a single exception, all Christian society accepts this as authentic and biblical, but it is based on the mistranslation of the Greek lambano. If the correct translation is not found, it is impossible to understand the Holy Spirit.

Chuck Smith insists that to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit, and to receive the Spirit is not to be baptized with the Spirit.

In John 20:22, if Jesus breathed on His men and said, “Receive the Holy Spirit,” the obvious meaning is that they received the Holy Spirit at that point–the Holy Spirit began to indwell them. The promise in Acts 1:4,5 was fulfilled on the day of Pentecost. That means that the baptism with the Holy Spirit occurred some time after the disciples’ conversion, and subsequent to their receiving the Holy Spirit as an indwelling presence. Receiving the Spirit is like believing in Jesus for salvation. The receiving of the Holy Spirit is subsequent to believing; one can believe without receiving this filling or the baptism of the Holy Spirit. This baptism or infilling with the Holy Spirit occurs subsequent to believing. (Chuck Smith, Living Water, p.260,272, 297.)

     Unfortunately, this note is in great contradiction. The note, “Receiving the Spirit is like believing in Jesus,” obviously is different from, “the receiving of the Holy Spirit is subsequent to believing.” The note, “Receiving the Spirit is like believing in Jesus,” can be changed into “to receive the Spirit is to believe in Jesus,” or “to believe in Jesus is to receive the Spirit.” The note, “the receiving of the Holy Spirit is subsequent to believing,” means “to receive the Holy Spirit is not to believe in Jesus.” But “to receive the Holy Spirit is to believe in Jesus” is completely distinct from “to receive the Holy Spirit is not to believe in Jesus.” Here, it is confirmed that Chuck Smith himself is in great confusion. The note, “In John 20:22, if Jesus breathed on His men and said, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit,’ the obvious meaning is that they received the Holy Spirit at that point,” means that the disciples who were already believing in Jesus did not receive the Holy Spirit until after resurrection. Here, it also is inconsistent with the note “to believe in Jesus is to receive the Spirit.”
     The note, “The receiving of the Holy Spirit is subsequent to believing,” means the same as “This baptism or infilling with the Holy Spirit occurs subsequent to believing,” that is, the receiving of the Holy Spirit, the baptism or infilling with the Holy Spirit occurs subsequent to believing. If it is applied to the 12 disciples, they were baptized with the Holy Spirit at the night of resurrection since they received the Holy Spirit at the night of resurrection. But it is quite unbiblical.
     Chuck Smith also insists that the promise in Acts 1:4,5 was fulfilled on the day of Pentecost, that is, the disciples were baptized with the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. According to the statements of Chuck Smith, the 12 disciples were baptized with the Holy Spirit at the night of resurrection, and they also were baptized with the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. The reason for this contradiction is based on the mistranslation of John 14:17 and the Greek verb lambano in John 7:39 and 20:22. The statements of Chuck Smith can be summarized: “to receive the Holy Spirit is to believe in Jesus, and to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized or infilling with the Holy Spirit.” The note “to receive the Holy Spirit is to believe in Jesus” is correct, but “to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized or infilling with the Holy Spirit” is thoroughly unbiblical. And the wording, “to be baptized or infilling with the Holy Spirit” is quite erroneous since the Holy Spirit is not treated as God and a divine Person.

Where did “to receive Christ is to receive the Spirit” come from?

Rom. 8:8-9,14-16  Those controlled by the sinful nature cannot please God. You, however, are controlled not by the sinful nature but by the Spirit, if the Spirit of God lives in you. And if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, he does not belong to Christ....because those who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. For you did not receive a spirit that makes you a slave again to fear, but you received (lambano) the Spirit of sonship. And by him we cry, “Abba, Father.” The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are God’s children. (NIV)

     The texts record, “If anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, he does not belong to Christ.” Here, it can be built the doctrine, “to have the Spirit is to belong to Christ, to belong to Christ is to become one body of Christ, to belong to Christ is to be Christian, and to receive Christ is to receive the Spirit.” The phrase, “You received the Spirit of sonship” in Rom. 8:15, implies that the sons of God, that is, all Christians, received the Spirit. All scholars accept that Rom. 8:8-16 records “to receive Christ is to receive the Spirit.” Actually, in Rom. 8, Paul affirms that it is biblical truth. Through Rom. 8, every scholar has concluded, “to receive Christ is to receive the Holy Spirit.” Without a single exception, every scholar applies this doctrine to the translation and interpretation of the NT. Actually, this doctrine must be applied to all Christians, to the 120 disciples before day of Pentecost, the Samaritans, Cornelius and the 12 disciples at Ephesus. Consequently, through these examinations it can be summarized as follows:

John 7:39………….To receive Jesus is not to receive the Spirit.
John 20:22………...To receive Jesus is not to receive the Spirit.
Acts 1:5…………...To receive Jesus is not to be baptized with the Spirit.
Acts 10:44-47……..To receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.
Acts 11:15-17……..To receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit.
Rom. 8:8-9,14-16....To receive Christ is to receive the Spirit.

     Through these passages, non-Pentecostals have constructed the doctrine of the Holy Spirit, “To receive Jesus = to receive the Spirit = to be baptized with the Spirit,” and they insist that it must always be applied to all Christians. But through the occasions of the 120 disciples and the Samaritans, Pentecostals insist that, “To receive Jesus  = to receive the Spirit = to be baptized with the Spirit” is not always applied to all Christians. But without a single exception, both groups accept “To receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit” as biblical truth. So in all Christian society, there is no objection on the doctrine of “To receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” Non-Pentecostals insist, “the 120 disciples were an exception because the Holy Spirit had not yet come on them until Pentecost, and the Samaritans also were an exception because they were not yet real Christians. They had not yet received the Holy Spirit even though they had received Jesus Christ through Phillip’s ministry.”
     Therefore, there is continually serious theological controversy and debate between Pentecostals and non-Pentecostals. Which is correct and biblical? Both insist their interpretations are correct and based on the Bible, but both doctrines of the Holy Spirit are quite distinct. What then is the source of this controversial debate? Without a single exception, every Christian, including all scholars, accepts the mistranslation of 1 Cor. 12:13 and the Greek lambano (John 7:39; 20:22; Acts 8:14-19; 10:47; 19:2; Gal. 3:2) as authentic. So their controversial debates are based upon the mistranslations of the Greek texts in these passages.

Where did “to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit” come from?(1) 

John 7:39  By this he meant the Spirit, whom those who believed in him were later to receive (lambano). Up to that time the Spirit had not been given, since Jesus had not yet been glorified. (NIV)

     According to the modern translations, John 7:39 speaks of those who believed in Jesus and were to receive the Spirit when Jesus was glorified. Acts 2:33 records that Jesus is exalted at the right hand of God, that He received from the Father the promised Holy Spirit and that He poured out what they saw and heard (NIV). Jesus was glorified after His resurrection and ascension into heaven. Thus, these literal records affirm that the 120 disciples received the Spirit at Pentecost.

Acts 1:5   John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit. (NIV)

     The text records that the 120 disciples were not yet baptized with/in the Holy Spirit before Jesus ascended into heaven. Thus, it can be concluded that the 120 disciples were baptized with/in the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. Through the literal records of John 7:39,  John 20:22, Acts 1:5 and  2:33, it can be said that the 120 disciples received the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost and were baptized with/in the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. Thus, through these scriptural records, without a single exception, all scholars, including Pentecostals and non-Pentecostals, argue that to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit. It seems to be biblical so that no one in all Christian society objects to the argument, “to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with Holy the Spirit.” But this is thoroughly unbiblical because it is from the mistranslation of the Greek lambano.

John 20:22    And with that he breathed on them and said, “Receive (lambano) the Holy Spirit.” (NIV)

     Many scholars argue that according to this command of Jesus on the first day of resurrection the disciples received the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. Thus, it is inferred that the command of John 20:22 was fulfilled on that day. So it is also argued that to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit. It seems to be biblical so that no one in all Christian society objects to this argument.
 
Acts 10:44-47 While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit came on all who heard the message. The circumcised believers who had come with Peter were astonished that the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out even on the Gentiles. For they heard them speaking in tongues and praising God. Then Peter said, “Can anyone keep these people from being baptized with water? They have received (lambano) the Holy Spirit just as we have.” (NIV)

     All scholars teach from these passages that Cornelius received the Holy Spirit just as the 120 disciples including Peter received the Holy Spirit when He came on them at Pentecost. The 120 disciples were baptized with the Holy Spirit when He came on them at Pentecost. Thus, without a single exception, all scholars, including Pentecostals and non-Pentecostals, insist that the Bible says “to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” It seems to be biblical so that no one objects to this interpretation and this doctrine of the Spirit because John 7, 20 and Acts 1, 2, 10 seem to validate this conclusion.

Acts 11:15-17  As I began to speak, the Holy Spirit came on them as he had come on us at the beginning. Then I remembered what the Lord had said: ‘John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.’ So if God gave them the same gift as he gave us, who believed in the Lord Jesus Christ, who was I to think that I could oppose God? (NIV)

     In Acts 11:15-17, Peter affirms that Cornelius and his family were baptized with the Holy Spirit just as he was on the day of Pentecost. Thus, Peter affirms that the phrase, “they have received the Holy Spirit” in Acts 10:44-47 is the same as “You will be baptized with the Holy Spirit” in Acts 11:15-17. It can be concluded that both passages affirm “to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” It seems to be biblical so that no one objects to this interpretation and this doctrine of the Spirit. Without a single exception, through the records of the Bible mentioned above, all scholars, including Pentecostals and non-Pentecostals, have built the doctrine of the Holy Spirit, “to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” Without a single exception, all scholars apply this doctrine to the translation and interpretation of the NT.

 

Where did “to receive the Spirit is to be baptized with the Spirit” come from?(2) 

     There are many phrases (“lambano God, lambano Jesus, and lambano the Holy Spirit”) found in the Bible (John 1:11-12; 7:39; 13:20; 14:17; 20:22; Acts 2:33; 2:38; 8:14-19; 10:47; 19:2; Rom. 8:15; 1 Cor. 2:12; 2 Cor. 11:4; Gal. 3:2-5; 3:14; Col. 2:6). Every English version, without a single exception, translates the Greek lambano in these passages as only “receive (accept or welcome),” but this is thoroughly erroneous translation. If the Greek verb lambano in these phrases is not clearly translated, it is absolutely impossible to stop the controversy on the relation between “To receive the Holy Spirit” and “to be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” The lambano (John 1:11-12; 13:20; 14:17; Acts 2:33; 2:38; Rom. 8:15; 1 Cor. 2:12; 2 Cor. 11:4; Gal. 3:14; Col. 2:6) must not be translated as “to be filled with” but only “to receive (accept or welcome).” But the Greek lambano (John 7:39; 20:22; Acts 8:14-19; 10:47; 19:2; Gal. 3:2) must not be translated as “to receive” but only “to be filled with.” Then, it is possible to stop the controversy.
 
Where did “to be baptized with the Spirit is to become Christian” come from?
1 Cor. 12:13    We were all baptized by one Spirit into (eis) one body. (All versions)

     Pentecostals and non-Pentecostals accept this translation as authentic without a single exception. The Today’s NIV (TNIV) translates this passage as, “We were all baptized by one Spirit so as to form one body.” This translation can be concluded that “to be baptized by the Spirit is to form one body, to receive Christ is to form one body, to believe in Christ is to form one body, to receive Christ is to be baptized by the Spirit, and one becomes a Christian through being baptized by the Spirit.” All scholars and all pastors apply this doctrine to translate and interpret the NT.

Merrill F. Unger comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

Now, in the normal course of the age, all believers are so united to Christ the moment they believe on Christ as Savior. For by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body (1 Cor. 12:13). The New Testament teaches that by the working of the Holy Spirit all believers are so intimately joined to Christ. (Merrill F. Unger, The Baptism & Gifts of the Holy Spirit, p.56-57.)

     Unger teaches that all believers are united to Christ at the moment they believe on Christ as Savior. This is thoroughly biblical, and the note, “The NT teaches that by the working of the Spirit all believers are so intimately joined to Christ,” is correct. But the note, “all believers are joined to Christ by the baptism of the Spirit,” is thoroughly unbiblical. To be regenerated, to be joined to Christ, is the work of the Holy Spirit, but it must be understood that the work of the Holy Spirit which is for the work of regeneration and joining to Christ is quite distinct from the work of the baptism of the Spirit for service subsequent to regeneration and subsequent to joining to Christ. Through 1 Cor. 12:13 Unger mistakenly teaches, “to be joined to Christ is to be baptized by the Holy Spirit.” But it must be, “to receive Jesus is to be joined to Christ, but to be joined to Christ is not to be baptized by the Holy Spirit.”

R. A. Torrey comments on 1 Cor. 12:13.

Potentially, every member of the body of Christ is baptized with the Holy Spirit. For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body...and have been al1 made to drink into one Spirit (1 Cor. 12:13). But there are many believers with whom that which is potentially theirs has not become a matter of real, actual, personal experience. Just so, while the baptism with the Holy Spirit is potentially the possession of every believer, each individual believer must appropriate it for himself before it is experientially his. We may go still further than this and say that it is only by the baptism with the Holy Spirit that one becomes in the fullest sense a member of the body of Christ, because it is only by the baptism with the Spirit that he receives power to perform those functions which God has appointed him as a part of the body. (R. A. Torrey, The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit, p.151-3.)

     Through 1 Cor. 12:13, Torrey insists that by the baptism with the Holy Spirit one becomes in the fullest sense a member of the body of Christ. But this is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of 1 Cor. 12:13. For instance, the 120 disciples including Peter were already the members of the body of Christ before Pentecost. With the correct translation of the Greek lambano and 1 Cor. 12:13, we understand to receive Jesus is to receive the Holy Spirit, to receive the Holy Spirit is not be baptized with/in the Holy Spirit, and to be baptized with/in the Holy Spirit is to be filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit. The baptism of the Holy Spirit takes place subsequent to regeneration/conversion.
     Torrey also insists, “Potentially, every member of the body of Christ is baptized with the Holy Spirit but there are many believers who have yet to realize that potential. They lack this real, actual, personal experience.” This note is unclear and ambiguous because he uses the term “potentially.” He insists that many members of the body of Christ are not baptized with the Holy Spirit at the moment they believe on Christ as Savior. This is quite right. Thus, Torrey himself is in great confusion and contradiction because he has accepted the mistranslation of 1 Cor. 12:13 and the Greek lambano as correct.
     The note, “it is only by the baptism with the Spirit that he receives power to perform those functions which God has appointed him as a part of the body,” is biblical and right interpretation since to be baptized with/in the Holy Spirit is to receive the power of the Holy Spirit for witnessing and service subsequent to conversion (Acts 1:5,8). In conclusion, the statements mentioned above show that every scholar accepts “to receive the Holy Spirit is to be baptized with/in/by the Holy Spirit” as biblical truth. According to every English version this conclusion seems to be biblical and logical, but it is thoroughly unscriptural. The fundamental flaw is from the mistranslation of 1 Cor. 12:13 and the Greek lambano (John 7:39; 20:22; Acts 8:14-19; 10:47; 19:2; Gal. 3:2.)
The aforementioned conclusions are from the mistranslation of the Greek text. The doctrinal statements, “To belong to Christ is to have the Spirit, to believe in Christ is to receive Christ, and to receive Christ is to receive the Spirit” in Rom. 8:8-16, must be applied to all believers including the 120 disciples before Pentecost, the Samaritans, and the Galatians of Gal. 3:2. The records, “God is the Spirit” (Author) in John 4:24 and “the Lord is the Spirit” in 2  Cor. 3:17 must be understood. “God” in John 4:24 is God the Father revealed in the OT. In OT days God is called the Lord. Thus, it can be constructed that to receive God the Father is to receive the Spirit. This doctrine must be applied to all believers - the disciples of John the Baptist, the believers before they meet Christ, the 3,000 believers before hearing the message of Peter at Pentecost, Cornelius and his family before meeting Peter, and the 12 Ephesians before meeting Paul. Then, the doctrine of the Spirit, “to receive God is to receive the Spirit and to receive Christ is to receive the Spirit, to receive the Spirit is not to be baptized with/in/by the Spirit” can be constructed.