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The nine gifts of the Holy Spirit

 

Richard B. Gaffin comments on the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Since around 1960 few topics have received more attention in the church than the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Some would say that this is still today the issue confronting the worldwide church. Certainly none has been the occasion of greater controversy and division within the church. That controversy is intense. Differences are strongly felt and often sharply expressed, and this is understandable, because at stake is Christian practice, the very personal experience of being a Christian. This book is yet another entry into this highly charge controversy over the gift of the Spirit. (Richard B. Gaffin, Perspectives on Pentecost, p.9.)

     Unfortunately, many mistranslations on the Holy Spirit lead to many erroneous controversial debates. It is impossible to stop the debates with the mistranslations.

Rene Pache comments on the lists of the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

What is a gift of the Spirit or a spiritual gift? It is a certain qualification given by the Spirit to each individual believer to enable him to serve within the framework of the body of Christ. Paul explains this for us by using the illustration of the body with all its different members (1 Cor 12)…Believers form the Body of Christ with its members, each with its appointed task; from the Spirit each receives the particular gift relevant to his function (1 Cor 12:27,11). (Rene Pache, The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit, p.180.)

     The comment, “a gift of the Spirit or a spiritual gift is a certain qualification given by the Spirit to each individual believer,” is right. But “from the Spirit each receives the particular gift relevant to his function” is quite erroneous. Each member has a function within the framework of the body of Christ. From this fact it should be concluded that individual believers are not the gifts of the Spirit. For instance, there are many different members in the body of Christ. These members may be a pastor, evangelist, teacher, pianist, financial officer, etc. These different members cannot be called the gifts given by the Spirit or the gifts of the Spirit. Rene Pache continues:

What are the different spiritual gifts? The Spirit who calls us to various fields of service, bestows the following diversity of gifts (1 Cor. 12:4,8-10,11); the gift of wisdom (v. 8), the gift of knowledge (v. 8), the gift of faith (v. 8), the gift of healing (v. 8), the gift of the working of miracles (v. 8), the gift of prophecy (v. 8), the gift of the discerning of spirit (v. 8), the gift of tongues (v. 8), the gift of the interpretation of tongues (v. 8), the gift of apostleship (v. 28), the gift of teaching (v. 28), the gift of giving assistance (v. 28), the gift of governing (v. 28), the gift of being evangelists (Eph. 4:11), the gift of being pastors, the gift of liberality (Rom. 12:8). It may well be that mention is to be found elsewhere of other gifts, for no claim is made that the above list is complete. (Rene Pache, Ibid., p.181.)

     “Wisdom, knowledge, faith, healing, working of miracles, prophecy, discerning of spirit, tongues, and interpretation of tongues,” are the gifts of the Spirit. But in the note, “apostleship, teaching, giving assistance, and governing, etc.,” are not the gifts given by the Spirit but the various functions of members. The members of church, pastor, evangelist, apostle, teacher, administrator, pianist, financial officer, etc., are by no means the gifts of the Spirit. The note, “the gift of apostleship (v. 28), the gift of teaching (v. 28), the gift of giving assistance (v. 28), the gift of governing (v. 28),” is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of 1 Cor. 12:28. “The gift of being evangelists (Eph. 4:11), the gift of being pastors, the gift of liberality (Rom. 12:8)” is from the misunderstanding of the relation between the members of the church and the gifts of the Spirit. Rene Pache continues:

Each child of God is given a gift. In the body there are no useless members or organs. In the Body of Christ, each believer receives a gift to carry out the function allotted to him. (Rene Pache, Ibid., p.182.)

     The words, “each believer, each member receives a gift to carry out the function allotted to him,” is right. The note, “In the Body of Christ, each believer receives a gift to carry out the function allotted to him,” is ambiguous. Instead, we should teach that in the Body of Christ, each believer must receive a gift or gifts to carry out the function allotted to him. These gifts must be received subsequent to regeneration. No believer receives the gift(s) of the Spirit at regeneration. It should be understood that the baptism of the Spirit is synonymous with the receiving of the gifts of the Spirit.

C. Peter Wagner comments on the kinds of the gifts of the Spirit.

Directory of the Spiritual gifts: Prophecy, Service, Teaching, Exhortation, Giving, Leadership, Mercy, Wisdom, Knowledge, Faith, Healing, Miracles, Discerning of spirits, Tongues, Interpretation of tongues, Apostle, Helps, Administration, Evangelist, Pastor, Celibacy, Voluntary poverty, Martyrdom, Hospitality, Missionary, Intercession, Deliverance. (Peter Wagner, Your spiritual gifts can help your church grow, Ventura, CA: Regal Books, 1994, p.9.)

     The note is a mixture of right and erroneous elements. It is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of Rom. 12:4-8, 1 Cor. 12:28-30 and Eph. 4:11. There is no scriptural reference to indicate the 27 gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Billy Graham comments on the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The Holy Spirit gives gifts to specific people in the church “for the equipping of the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ” (Eph. 4:12). It is enough to say here that the Holy Spirit gives every Christian some gift the moment he receives Christ. No Christian can say, “I have no gift.” Every believer has at least one gift from the Holy Spirit. A weakness in today’s churches is the failure to recognize, cultivate, and use fully the gifts God has given people in the pews. The New Testament lists “the gifts of the Holy Spirit” in three passages - Romans 12:6-8; 1 Corinthians 12:8-10; and Ephesians 4:11. There is a fourth in 1 Peter 4:10,11, al- though it seems to duplicate material included in the previous lists. In my case I believe God has given me the gift of evangelism, but I did not ask for it. (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, p.31,165-166,168.)

     Billy Graham’s notes are from the mistranslation and misinterpretation (1 Cor. 12:28-30; Eph. 4:11; Rom. 12:6-8; 1 Peter 4:10-11). The note, “The Holy Spirit gives gifts to specific people in the church,” is right. In his note “the specific people” are not called the gifts given by the Holy Spirit. The specific believers referred to are apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers (Eph. 4:11), are not the gifts given by the Holy Spirit. They are called specific people, i.e., members in the church. So the note, “In my case I believe God has given me the gift of evangelism, but I did not ask for it,” is thoroughly inaccurate. Even though Billy Graham was unquestionably a famous evangelist, he displays the misunderstanding of the relation between the members of the church and the gifts of the Holy Spirit. The note, “It is enough to say here that the Holy Spirit gives every Christian some gift at the moment he receives Christ,” is thoroughly unbiblical. This is from the misunder-standing of the relation between the regeneration and the baptism of the Holy Spirit, that is, the gifts of the Holy Spirit. There is no scriptural reference to indicate that the Holy Spirit gives every Christian some type of gift at the moment he receives Christ, i.e., the moment of salvation. Billy Graham continues:

The filling of the Spirit for power was not limited to preaching. The apostles became so tied down with the daily ministrations to the multiplied new believers that they were unable to devote themselves fully to the ministry of the Word. So they asked for seven men to be appointed for this practical job–a job of administration. They laid down three qualifications for the officeholders: they were to be “of good reputation, full of the Spirit and of wisdom...No man should be an officer in the church today who does not possess these qualifications. Does this not show us that to carry the most practical job to the glory of God (be it as a craftsman, an administrator, a housekeeper, or secretary) we need to be filled with God’s Holy Spirit–as well as of good reputation and wisdom? (Billy Graham, Ibid., p.131.)

     The term “The filling of the Spirit for power” is erroneous. It should be “The filling of the power of the Spirit.” The words “The filling of the Spirit for power” is quite distinct from “The filling of the power of the Spirit.” The term “The filling of the Spirit” is quite erroneous since it fails to treat the Spirit as God the Spirit and a divine Person. The note, “they asked for seven men to be appointed for this practical job–a job of administration,” should be understood. The apostles, who were filled with the power of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost, appointed men who were full of the wisdom and faith of the Holy Spirit; that is, they possessed the gifts of the wisdom and faith of the Holy Spirit as administrators for a job of administration. Neither an apostle nor an administrator is a gift of the Holy Spirit.
     Billy Graham and many scholars mistakenly insist that apostle and administrator are the gifts of the Holy Spirit. This is thoroughly inaccurate. The practical offices of the church, i.e., an apostle, a teacher, a pastor, a craftsman, an administrator, a secretary, an officer in the church, are the callings of various members of Christ’s body. The offices can by no means be called the gift or the gifts of the Holy Spirit. The statement of Billy Graham, “The NT lists the gifts of the Holy Spirit in three passages (Rom. 12:6-8; 1 Cor. 12:8-10; Eph. 4:11). There is a fourth in 1 Peter 4: 10,11, although it seems to duplicate material included in the previous lists,” affirmed that it is in great confusion and contradiction. It should be inferred that only 1 Cor.12:8-10 lists the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit. Rom. 12:6-8 and Eph. 4: 11 list only the offices and functions of the members of the one body of Christ in the church.

Merrill F. Unger comments on the baptism and gift of the Spirit.

The 120 disciples at Pentecost consequently receive the Spirit. At Pentecost the gift of the Spirit was received. (Merrill F. Unger, The Baptism & Gifts of the Holy Spirit, p.69,76.)

     Unger teaches that the 120 disciples received the Spirit, that is, the gift of the Spirit at Pentecost, but it is from the misinterpretation of Acts 2:38. The note, “The 120 disciples at Pentecost consequently receive the Spirit. At Pentecost the gift of the Spirit was received,” can be summarized as, “to receive the Spirit is to receive the gift of the Spirit.” “To receive the Spirit is to receive the gift of the Spirit” makes no sense at all because the Spirit Himself is treated as the gift of the Spirit. Acts 1:8 and 2:4 confirm that the 120 disciples at Pentecost received the power of the Spirit, that is, the filling of the power of the Spirit/the gift of the tongues of the Spirit. Merrill F. Unger continues:

It is commonly believed among Pentecostals and Neo-Pentecostals that the believer is not endowed with his particular gift or gifts of the Spirit till he is baptized in the Spirit. Pentecostals not only equate the baptism of the Spirit with an experience after salvation but also identify it with the gift of the Spirit. It has been noted in preceding chapter that the Pentecostal concept of “the gift of the Spirit” as the baptism of the Spirit is unwarranted from Scripture. The gift of the Spirit in realty is the initial once-for-all giving of the Holy Spirit by the ascended Christ (Jn 14:16-17) to work out the free gift of salvation in Jew (Ac 1:5; 2:38-39), in racially mongrel Samaritan (Ac 8:14-16) and in Gentile (Ac 10:45). The term gift of the Spirit, there fore, does not refer to some experience subsequent to salvation but to salvation itself. (Merrill F. Unger, Ibid., p.133-134,135.)

     The note, “the Pentecostal concept of ‘the gift of the Spirit’ as the baptism of the Spirit is unwarranted from Scripture,” is thoroughly inaccurate and based on the mistranslation and misinterpretation of the relation between the baptism of the Spirit and the gift or gifts of the Spirit. The Pentecostal concept, “the believer is not endowed with his particular gift or gifts of the Spirit till he is baptized in the Spirit,” is biblically supported, but the phrase, “he is baptized in the Spirit,” is inaccurate. It should read, “he is baptized with/in the Spirit (and with/in fire) or the fire baptism of the Spirit.” As noted already above, Acts 1:5,8 and 2:3-4 confirm that the 120 disciples at Pentecost received the power of the Spirit, that is, they were filled with the power of the Spirit, the gift of the tongues of the Spirit. To receive the baptism of the Spirit is to be filled with the power of the Spirit, and to be filled with the power of the Spirit is to receive the gift or gifts of the Spirit. The note, “The term gift of the Spirit does not refer to some experience subsequent to salvation but to salvation itself,” also is quite erroneous. The gift of the Spirit is by no means salvation itself. Salvation is the gift given by the Son sent by God the Father who “so loved the world.” But salvation is not called the gift of the Spirit. The 120 disciples had already received salvation before they received the gift of the Holy Spirit, that is, the power of the Holy Spirit, the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost.  

Stanley M. Horton comments on the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

In 1 Corinthian chapter 12 Paul gives three lists of gifts. The first (12:8-10) list nine gifts, which each with a variety of ways in which it can be manifested. The second list (12:28) gives eight gifts including people used in ministry. Three of these gifts are not mentioned in the first list. The third list (12:29,30) lists seven gifts with elements taken from both of the previous lists...By combining these lists with the lists in Romans 12:6-8 and Ephesians 4:11 in various ways it is possible to come up with a total of 18 to 20 gifts. But some of these gifts overlap. Romans 12 lists exhortation as a distinct gift. In 1 Corinthians 14:3 it is included as a function of prophecy. Ephe- sians 4:11 seems to include the pastor and teacher together as one. There are probably many other interrelations. Third, gifts for service and outreach. These include administration, ruling, ministry, giving, helps, mercy, and exhortation. Other gifts overlap into this group. Prophecy, faith, miracles, and healing certainly contribute to outreach. (Stanley M. Horton, What the Bible says about the Holy Spirit, p.209-210,264.)

     Horton’s argument on the gifts of the Spirit is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation (1 Cor. 12:28-30, Rom. 12:4-8 and Eph. 4:11). These passages do by no means describe the kinds of the gifts of the Spirit but the different members and functions of the body of Christ in the church. Horton erroneously claims that it is possible to come up with a total of 18 to 20 gifts. The Scripture specifically teaches that there are the only nine gifts of the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:8-10.

Guy P. Duffield/N. M. Van Cleave comment on the kinds of the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The gifts enumerated in 1 Corinthians chapter twelve: Word of wisdom (v. 8), Word of knowledge (v. 8), Special faith (v. 9), Gifts of healings (cures) (v. 9), Operation of miracles (v. 10), Prophecy (v. 10), Discerning of spirits (v. 10), Kinds of tongues (v. 10), Interpretation of tongues (v. 10), Helps (v. 28), Governments (v. 28).  (Guy P. Duffield/N.M. Van Cleave, Foundations of Pentecostal Theology, p.266.)

     “Helps and Governments” are by no means the gifts of the Holy Spirit. It is based upon the mistranslation and misinterpretation of 1 Cor. 12:28. Guy P. Duffield/N. M. Van Cleave continue:

The gifts listed in Romans chapter twelve: Prophecy and Ministry (v. 7), Teaching (v. 7), Exhortation (v.7), Giving (sharing) (v.8), Leadership (v.8),  Showing  mercy (v.8) (Guy P. Duffield/N.M. Van Cleave, Ibid., p.266.)

     This note is thoroughly unbiblical since it is from the mistranslation of Rom. 12:4-8 which does by no means speak of the gifts of the Spirit. Guy P. Duffield/N. M. Van Cleave continue:

The ministry gifts inscribed in Ephesians chapter four: The Apostle, The Prophet, The Evangelist, The Pastor-Teacher. (Guy P. Duffield/N.M. Van Cleave, Ibid., p.266.)

     This note also is thoroughly inaccurate since it is from the misunderstanding of the relation between the gifts of the Holy Spirit and church’s members who have different functions (1 Cor. 12:4-5; 7-10; 27-28). Guy P. Duffield/N. M. Van Cleave continue:

Other probable spiritual gifts: Hospitality (1 Pt. 4:9,10), Intercession (Rom. 8:26, 27; Eph. 5:18,19), Witnessing (Acts 1:8). (Guy P. Duffield/N.M. Van Cleave, Ibid., p.266.)

     This note also is thoroughly unbiblical since it is from the mistranslation and misunderstanding of the gifts of the Holy Spirit. The Bible confirms that there are the only nine gifts of the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:7-10.

Harry N. Wendt comments on the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

When Jesus ascended, He gave parting gifts to His people. These parting gifts are persons of Word, “apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers,” Ephesians 4:11. (Harry N. Wendt, cited form Crossways International - the divine drama, p.117.)

     The persons, “apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers,” are by no means the gifts of the Spirit. They are only members who have different functions to do the work of Jesus, preaching and teaching the gospel. Wendt’s argument is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of 1 Cor. 12:27-30, Rom. 12:4-8 and Eph. 4:11.

John F. MacArthur comments on the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

As we study the Scriptures, we find three categories of spiritual gifts. In Ephesians 4 there is the category of gifted men: apostles, prophets, evangelists, teaching pastors, and teachers. The men themselves are described as gifts from Christ to his church. Second, there are the permanent edifying gifts, including knowledge, wisdom, prophecy (authoritative preaching), teaching, exhortation, faith (or prayer), discernment, showing mercy, giving, administration, and helps (see Rom. 12:3-8; 1 Cor. 12:8-10,28). Third, there were the temporary sign gifts. These were specific enablements given to certain believers for the purpose of authenticating or confirming God‘s Word when it was proclaimed in the early church before the Scriptures were written. (John F. MacArthur, Charismatic Chaos, p.243.)

     MacArhur’s statement is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of Eph. 4:11, Rom. 12:3-8, 1 Cor. 12:8-10 and 12:28.

Sinclair B. Ferguson comments on the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

In our own time, these ‘action’ gifts’ (spiritual gifts) have become as much an arena of debate and disagreement as the ‘sign gifts’ (the sacraments) were in earlier church history. Central to the exercise of any gift of the Spirit is the ministry of the word given to God’s people. There is no comprehensive list of the gifts of Spirit in any one passage of the New Testament. But in the lists which do exist (Rom. 12:3-8; 1 Cor. 12:7-11; 28-30; Eph. 4:11; 1 Pet. 4:10-11). (Sinclair B. Ferguson, The Holy Spirit, p.208.)

     Ferguson’s note “in the lists which do exist” (Rom. 12:3-8; 1 Cor. 12:7-11; 28-30; Eph. 4:11; 1 Pet. 4:10-11) is from a mistranslation and misinterpretation. There are the only nine gifts of the Holy Spirit written in 1 Cor. 12:7-10.

Chuck Smith comments on the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

In I Corinthians 12 Paul lists nine spiritual gifts. The first thing to understand is that there are diversities of gifts. In Corinthians 12 lists nine different gifts. Yet this is not a complete or exhaustive list; toward the end of the chapter Paul also mentions the gifts of helps and governments, and in Romans 12 he again adds to the list. Paul says there are different gifts, yet only one Spirit. It is the same Spirit who distributes all of the gifts as He wills. (Chuck Smith, Living Water, p.89.)

     Chuck Smith’s note, “In 1 Corinthians 12 lists nine different gifts,” is correct. But the note, “toward the end of the chapter Paul also mentions the gifts of helps and governments, and in Romans 12, he again adds to the list,” is from a mistranslation and misinterpretation. Chuck Smith continues:

Second, there are different of ministries. Some have the gift of apostleship, some the gift of prophets, some the gift of pastor-teachers. Others have the gift of government of the gift of helps. Some have the gift of exhortation, an important and valuable gift. These are all different gifts of administration, but the same Lord directs them all. Though we may serve Him in different ways, we serve the same Lord. Third, there are diversities of operations. I know how certain gifs operate in my life, but it doesn’t follow that they will operate in the same way in your life. They might, but not necessarily. Why not? Because there are diversities of operations. The Spirit works differently in our lives, according to our own unique personalities and idiosyncrasies. My spiritual gift is that of teaching. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.90-91.)

     The note, “Some have the gift of apostleship, some the gift of prophets, some the gift of pastor-teachers,” is from a mistranslation and misinterpretation because apostles, prophets, pastors, teachers, governors of helps, and administrators are the kinds of members in the body of Christ. In 1Cor. 12:4-6, Paul mentions diversities of gifts, different ministries, and diversities of operations. Many scholars, pastors and teachers, including Chuck Smith, mistakenly claim that gifts are the same as ministries and operations. Chuck Smith also mistakenly claims, “My spiritual gift is that of teaching.” Chuck Smith continues:

Even as there were pastors and evangelists and apostles in the New Testament church, so there was the office of prophet. Paul, in Ephesians 4:11, wrote. And he gave some apostles and some prophets and some evangelists and some pastors and some teachers. In the Calvary Chapel many men are gifted as teachers and as evangelists. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.152-3,296.)

     In the note, “pastors, evangelists, apostles, prophet, and teachers” mistakenly are called gifts like the nine gifts of the Spirit. The note, “In the Calvary Chapel many men are gifted as teachers and as evangelists,” is thoroughly inaccurate. These men in the church must be not regarded as the kinds of the gifts of the Spirit but the members who have different functions in the church. Chuck Smith continues:

He brought to mind what Paul had said in 1 Corinthians 12:31: “Earnestly desire the best gifts,” which is what I thought I had been doing. But Paul goes on to say, “And yet I show you a more excellent way [than the gifts of healing or miracles].” And that is the gift of love. Paul answered that question by saying, the fruit of the Spirit is love (Galatians 5:22). When a person is overflowing with the Spirit, what rushes out is God’s divine love. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.131,284.)

     Chuck Smith mentions the gift of love and love as the fruit of the Spirit. Here, he erroneously insists that love is the gift of the Spirit and also love is the fruit of the Spirit. It should be understood that love is not a gift of the Spirit but one of the fruit of the Spirit. The note, “When a person is overflowing with the Spirit,” quite erroneous since he fails to treat the Spirit as God the Spirit. If it were to read, “When a person is overflowing with God,” it makes no sense at all. Likewise, the note, “When a person is overflowing with the Spirit,” makes no sense.

Chuck Smith insists that the gift of the Spirit is the Spirit Himself.

The Holy Spirit is God Himself, a Person with whom you can enjoy a personal relationship. He is not merely an impersonal force or power or essence within the universe, but He is rather a Person who can speak to you and to whom you can speak. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.13.)

     The note “The Holy Spirit is God Himself, a Person” is right, and without a single exception it must be applied to the translation and interpretation of the Scripture. Chuck Smith continues:

Peter answered, “…you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit” (Acts 2:38). The “gift” Peter was talking about is the epi, the overflowing of God’s power for service. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.263.)

     The note says that the gift of the Spirit is the overflowing of God’s power for service. This is erroneous. The gift of the Holy Spirit in Acts 2:38 does not speak of the overflowing of God’s power for service but of the power of the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:8) or the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:4). Smith continues:

In Acts 8:14,15 although these believers had been baptized in the name of Jesus, they had not yet received the gift of the Holy Spirit. When Peter and John laid their hands on them and prayed for them, they received the Holy Spirit. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.264.)

     The note says that to receive the gift of the Holy Spirit is to receive the Holy Spirit. This is based on the mistranslation of the Greek verb lambano in Acts 8:15-19. So it should read, “They had not yet been filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit. They were filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit when Peter and John laid their hands on them and prayed for them.” So it can be said that the power of the Holy Spirit is the gift of the Holy Spirit. Chuck Smith continues:

In Acts 2:38, Peter replied, “You shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” God wants to bestow upon us the gift of the Holy Spirit. It is a gift that must be received. Peter said we would receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. Jesus also called the Holy Spirit a gift (see Acts 1:4). And the only way to possess a gift is to receive it. The gift of the Holy Spirit must be received by faith. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.270,271.)

     Smith says here that the Holy Spirit is a gift of the Holy Spirit. But this is quite unbiblical. The Holy Spirit must not be treated as a gift but as God the Holy Spirit and a divine Person. In the note mentioned above, Chuck Smith insists that the Holy Spirit is God Himself, a Person, but here he also insists that the Holy Spirit is a gift. So Chuck Smith himself is in great confusion. He says that Jesus also called the Holy Spirit a gift (see Acts 1:4), but it is quite erroneous since it is based on the misinterpretation of Acts 1:4-5,8. Jesus did by no means call the Holy Spirit a gift. The gift in Acts 1:4 does not refer to the Holy Spirit but to the phrase, “You will be baptized with the Holy Spirit” in Acts 1:5, that is, the baptism of the Holy Spirit and the power of the Holy Spirit in Acts 1:8. Jesus called “the baptism of the Spirit/the power of the Spirit” a gift. Chuck Smith continues:

Of course, no one begs for a gift; you simply receive it. The Holy Spirit is God’s gift to you to enable you to overcome sin, to be conformed to the image of Jesus Christ, and to transform you into a powerful witness for the Lord. The Holy Spirit is not given to you so that you might have an ecstatic spiritual experience. Rather, He is given to you so that you might have the power to live for Jesus. But you must ask for the Holy Spirit. Jesus said, “If a son asks for bread any father among you, will he give him a stone? ....If you then, being evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, now much more will your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who asks Him” (Luke 11:11-13). (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.276.)

     The note, “no one begs for a gift; you simply receive it. The Holy Spirit is God’s gift,” is quite inconsistent with the note, “you must ask for the Holy Spirit.” This inconsistency is from the misinterpretation of “the gift of the Holy Spirit” in Acts 2:38 and Luke 11:11-13. “The gift of the Holy Spirit” in Acts 2:38 does not refer to the Holy Spirit Himself. “If you then, being evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who asks Him” (Luke 11:11-13), should be translated and inferred, “If you then, being evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your heavenly Father give the gifts of the Holy Spirit to those who asks Him.”

Robert Gromacki insists that the gift of the Holy Spirit is the Holy Spirit Himself.

Peter preached that repentance would bring the remission of sins and “the gift of the Holy Spirit” (Acts 2:38). The gift and the promise are the same, namely, the Spirit Himself. Several times in Acts the initial indwelling of the Holy Spirit is defined as a gift (Acts 8:15; 10:44-47; 11:15-17; 15:8). God is the Giver, the Spirit is the gift. The Spirit gives believers abilities to function in the ministry assigned to them. Every believer has received at least one gift (1 Cor. 12:7). A believer may have more than one gift, but he can not have all the gifts (12:27-30). These gifts are equated with the function of body member (12:12). The New Testament records five lists (Rom. 12:3-8; 1 Cor. 12:4-11; 1 Cor. 12:28-30; Eph. 4:7-16; 1 Peter 4:10-11. (Robert Gromacki, The Holy Spirit, p.488,508,513-4.)

     This note is a mixture of correct and incorrect elements based upon the misinterpretation of Acts 2:38, and the mistranslation of the Greek lambano in Acts 8:15 and 10:44-47, and the misunderstanding of the gifts of the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:4-11. The note, “These gifts are equated with the function of body member,” is thoroughly unbiblical because the gifts of the Spirit are abilities given by the Spirit to members that they may function in their assigned ministries. The argument, “The NT records five lists” (Rom. 12:3-8; 1 Cor. 12:4-11; 1 Cor. 12:28-30; Eph. 4:7-16; 1 Pet. 4:10-11), is thoroughly unbiblical. Only 1 Cor. 12:8-10 records the kinds of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit.
 

The Zondervan NIV Bible Commentary comments on 1 Cor. 12.

No body can function as all seeing, all hearing, or all smelling. So for the church to function properly, it must have different gifts and offices. It is the sovereign God alone who dispenses offices and gifts to his church. The order of the gifts here is instructive. The first three–apostles, prophets, and teachers–are in the same order as in Eph 4:11 (cf. Ro 12:6-7) and, as placed first, must be considered of greatest importance; these are classes of persons ruling in the church. The next gifts are set off from the first three by “then” and range in order from miracles to the ability to speak in different kinds of tongues, which, being mentioned last, seem to be of least importance. The office of apostle was all encompassing, including the gifts of pro- phecy, teaching, miracles, and the rest...those having the gift of being “able to help others” are persons gifted in helping the church officers deal with the poor and the sick. Those with “administration” have ability to govern and manage affairs in the church. In v. 29-30, not all believers function in each of the ways listed. God selects individuals and gives them their specific gifts (v. 28). (The Zondervan NIV Bible Commentary, p.262-3.)

     This Commentary’s notes are a mixture of correct and incorrect interpretations. The note, “for the church to function properly, it must have different gifts and offices,” is correct. But the note, “the office of apostle...those having the gift of being able to help others are persons gifted in helping the church,” is incorrect.

The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary comments on 1 Cor. 12:28-30.

The variety of offices instituted by Christ, and gifts or favours dispensed by him (v. 28). The plentiful variety of these gifts and favours. The various distribution of these gifts. All members and officers did not have the same endowments (v. 29,30). The Spirit distributes to everyone as he wills. (The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary, p.630.)

     “The offices of the church” are quite distinct from the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Most erroneously accept the offices of the church as synonymous with the gifts of the Holy Spirit. This misunderstanding is from the mistranslations of 1 Cor. 12:28-30 and Rom. 12:4-8 which speak of different officers with different functions in the church.

Michael Green comments on the Pentecostal position on the gifts of the Holy Sprit.

The usual Pentecostal position is that there are nine such gifts, set out for us in 1 Corinthians 12:8-10. They are ‘a word of wisdom, a word of knowledge, faith, healings, prophecy, discernment of spirits, different kinds of tongues, and interpretation of tongues.’ They can conveniently be grouped into three areas, the gifts to say (prophecy, tongues, and interpretation); the gifts to do (healings, miracles, faith); and the gifts to know (discerning of spirits, knowledge, and wisdom). There seems to me to be one overwhelming reason why it is impossible to treat these nine gifts as exhaustive in number and quality. Paul gives various lists of spiritual gifts or functions, and the lists differ. They oscillate between spiritual gifts and spiritual functions, but this should not surprise us if we remember that the various types of ministry in the Church are all called God’s gift to his people (Eph. 4:11). Ministers are just as much God’s gift to us as are spiritual gifts. Paul gives three lists of gifts in chapter 12 of 1 Corinthians: the first in verses 8-10, the second in verse 28 and the third in verses 29-30. Three additional lists are in Romans 12:6-8, Ephesians 4:11-12, and 1 Peter 4:9-11. (Michael Green, I believe in the Holy Spirit, p.195-244.)

     The note says that the usual Pentecostal position is that there are nine such gifts, set out for us in 1 Corinthians 12:8-10. The Pentecostal position on the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit is exactly biblical. Ministers can by no means be called spiritual gifts or the gifts of the Holy Spirit. The statements of Michael Green are from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of 1 Cor. 12:28-30, Rom. 12:6-8, Eph. 4:11 and 1 Peter  4:9-11.

 

1 Cor. 12:4-6 must be examined to understand the gifts of the Spirit.

1 Cor. 12:4-6   Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit. And there are differences of administrations, but the same Lord, there are diversities of operations, but it is the same God. (KJV)
NIV      There are different kinds of gifts, but the same Spirit. There are different kinds of service, but the same Lord. There are different kinds of working, but the same God.  

     All records of I Cor. 12:1-31 explain the nine kinds of gifts, different kinds of services (ministries, administrations), and different kinds of workings (activities, operations). The texts specifically list the nine gifts that are quite distinct from the kinds of services and kinds of workings. To interpret these gifts and services as gifts makes no sense at all. Many scholars erroneously accept the gifts and services as the same meaning. If 1 Cor. 12:4-6 is not understood, it becomes impossible to understand the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:7-10.

1 Cor. 12:7-10 records that there are the nine gifts of the Spirit.

1 Cor.12:7-10   Now to each one the manifestation of the Spirit is given for the common good. To one there is given through the Spirit the message of wisdom, to another the message of knowledge by means of the same Spirit, to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healing by that one Spirit, to another miraculous powers, to another prophecy, to another distinguishing between spirits, to another speaking in different kinds of tongues, and to still another the interpretation of tongues. (NIV)

     The text in 1 Cor.12:7-10 indicates that there are different kinds of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit.  

1 Cor. 12 shows the relation between the gifts of the Spirit and members of the church.

1 Cor. 12:11-12   All these are the work of one and the same Spirit, and he gives them to each one, just as he determines. The body is a unit, though it is made up of many parts; and though all its parts are many, they form one body. So it is with Christ. (NIV)

     We read that the Holy Spirit gives the gifts of the Holy Spirit to “each one” of all the members of one body severally, just as he determines. The word “each one” refers to all the members of the church. There are many members in the church. Many scholars insist that “apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, teachers” (Eph. 4:11) are the gifts of the Holy Spirit. This argument is from a wrong interpretation. These “apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, teachers” are not the gifts of the Holy Spirit but members who edify the body of Christ. All the members of the church do not have the same gifts or office.

1 Cor. 12:13-14  For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body, whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit. For the body is not one member, but many. (KJV)

     All English versions mistakenly translate 1 Cor. 12:13, as we have already seen. It must be translated, “For we were all baptized by one Spirit in one body.” The meaning of 1 Cor. 12:13 can be found in the context of this chapter. All the records in 1 Cor. 12 describe the different nine gifts of the Spirit and the different offices of members of the body of Christ.
     1 Cor. 12:13 can be read as follows: “We were all baptized by one Spirit in one body. We, all the members of the church, were baptized by one Spirit in one body of Christ. The nine gifts of the Spirit were given to us by one Spirit in one body of Christ, just as He determines.” To be baptized by one Spirit in one body is to receive the nine gifts of the Spirit in one body. The baptism of the Spirit is to receive the power of the Holy Spirit. To receive the power of the Holy Spirit is to receive the gifts of the Spirit. The power of the Holy Spirit contains the nine gifts of the Spirit. The Spirit gives us new life at conversion, and He also gives the nine gifts of the Spirit to each one of us at the baptism of the Spirit after conversion, just as he determines.

1 Cor. 12:27-30 does not record the gifts of the Spirit but the members of the church.

     If 1 Cor. 12:28 is not correctly translated, it is impossible to understand the kinds of the gifts of the Holy Spirit. The misunderstanding of the kinds of the gifts is from the mistranslation of 1 Cor. 12:28. 1 Cor. 12:4-6 must be carefully examined to translate 1 Cor. 12:28. 1 Cor. 12:4-6 says, “There are different kinds of gifts, but the same Spirit. There are different kinds of services but the same Lord. There are different kinds of workings, but the same God.” The kinds of gifts of the Spirit are quite distinct from the kinds of services and workings.

The KJV mistranslates 1 Cor. 12:28.

1 Cor. 12:27   Now ye are the body of Christ, and members in particular. (KJV)
1 Cor.12:28    God hath set some in the church, first apostles, secondarily prophets, thirdly teachers, after that miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, governments, diversities of tongues. (KJV)
1 Cor. 12:29    Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Are all workers of miracles? (KJV)
1 Cor. 12:30    Have all the gifts of healing? Do all speak with tongues? Do all interpret? (KJV) 

     According to the Greek text of v. 28, the translation of KJV seems correct. But v. 28 must be translated to be consistent with v. 27,29,30 because these verses do not speak of the gifts of the Spirit but only the members in the church. The “miracles (powers)” in the Greek text must be translated as “the workers of miracles” or “those who perform miracles” according to v. 29. Likewise, “the gifts of healing” should be “healers or those having gifts of healing.” 1 Cor. 12:28 does by no means describe those having all the nine gifts. Let’s examine the following to understand the members of the church mentioned in 1 Cor. 12:27-30.

 

God has appointed apostles in the church............................It makes sense.
God has appointed prophets in the church.......................... It makes sense.
God has appointed teachers in the church........................... It makes sense.
God has appointed workers of miracles in the church..........It makes sense.
God has appointed healers in the church..............................It makes sense.
God has appointed helpers in the church..............................It makes sense.
God has appointed administrators in the church...................It makes sense.
God has appointed speakers in tongues in the church...........It makes sense.
God has appointed powers in the church..............................It makes no sense.
God has appointed gifts of healing in the church..................It makes no sense.
God has appointed helps in the church..................................It makes no sense.
God has appointed governing in the church..........................It makes no sense.
God has appointed kinds of tongues in the church................It makes no sense.

     The words, “God has appointed, apostles, prophets, and teachers,” are logical, but to say, “God has appointed powers, gifts of healing, various kinds of tongues,” makes no sense at all. Every member of one body of the church is a servant of Jesus just like the apostle Paul. 1 Cor. 12:4-6 surely indicates that there are different kinds of gifts, different kinds of services and different kinds of workings. The lists of apostles, prophets, and teachers in v. 29 is not a listing of the gifts of the Holy Spirit. 1 Cor. 12:27-30 does by no means describe the gifts of the Holy Spirit but the various kinds of offices of members in the church. If this is not accepted as biblical truth, it becomes impossible to understand the relation between different kinds of gifts and different kinds of services. It must be inferred that the kinds of gifts are quite distinct from the kinds of services, that is, the kinds of members in the church. The various members in the church can have the different kinds of gifts of the Spirit. So the various members (apostles, prophets, pastors and teachers) in the church cannot be called the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The NKJ mistranslates 1 Cor. 12:28.
And God has appointed these in the church: first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, after that miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, administrations, varieties of tongues.

The RSV correctly translates 1 Cor. 12:28. 
And God has appointed in the church first apostles, second prophets, third teachers; then workers of miracles, then healers, helpers, administrators, speakers in various kinds of tongues.

The NRS mistakenly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
And God has appointed in the church first apostles, second prophets, third teachers; then deeds of power, then gifts of healing, forms of assistance, forms of leadership, various kinds of tongues.

The NIV mistakenly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
And in the church God has appointed first of all apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then workers of miracles, also those having gifts of healing, those able to help others, those with gifts of administration, and those speaking in different kinds of tongues. (* Only “those with gifts of administration” is a mistranslation.)

The NJB mistakenly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
And those whom God has appointed in the Church are, first apostles, secondly prophets, thirdly teachers; after them, miraculous powers, then gifts of healing, helpful acts, guidance, various kinds of tongues.

The NAB mistakenly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
Some people God has designated in the church to be, first, apostles; second prophets; third, teachers; then mighty deeds; then gifts of healing, assistance, administration, and varieties of tongues.

The TEV correctly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
In the church God has put all in place: in the first place apostles, in the second place prophets, and in the third place teachers; then those who perform miracles, followed by those who are given the power to heal or to help others or to direct them or to speak in strange tongues.

The NAS mistakenly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
And God has appointed in the church, first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, administrations, various kinds of tongues.

The NAU mistakenly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
And God has appointed in the church, first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, administrations, various kinds of tongues.

The NLT correctly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
Here is a list of some of the members that God has placed in the body of Christ: first are apostles, second are prophets, third are teachers, then those who do miracles, those who have the gift of healing, those who can help others, those who can get others to work together, those who speak in unknown languages.

The RWB mistakenly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
God hath set some in the church, first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, governments, various kinds of tongues.

The YLT mistakenly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
And some, indeed, did God set in the assembly, first apostles, secondly prophets, thirdly teachers, afterwards powers, afterwards gifts of healings, helpings, governings, divers kinds of tongues;

The Amplified Bible incorrectly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
The Amplified Bible translates “prophets” as “inspired preachers and expounders” is quite erroneous since “prophets” does not mean inspired preachers and expoundders.

The NEB correctly translates 1 Cor. 12:28.
Within our community God has appointed, in the first place apostles, in the second place prophets, thirdly teachers; then miracle-workers, then those who have gifts of healing, or ability to help others or power to guide them, or the gift of ecstatic utterance of various kinds.

     The CJB, GWN, MIT, and NIRV also correctly translate 1 Cor. 12:28, but the CSB, ESV, NET, and TNIV incorrectly translate 1 Cor. 12:28.

Rom. 12:4-8 does not list the gifts of the Spirit but the kinds of the functions of members.

Rom. 12:4    Just as each of us has one body with many members, and these members do not all have the same function,
Rom. 12:5    so in Christ we who are many form one body, and each member belongs to all the others.
Rom. 12:6    We have different gifts, according to the grace given us. If a man’s gift is prophesying, let him use it in proportion to his faith.
Rom. 12:7    If it is serving, let him serve; if it is teaching, let him teach;
Rom. 12:8    if it is encouraging, let him encourage; if it is contributing to the needs of others, let him give generously; if it is leadership, let him govern diligently; if it is showing mercy, let him do it. (NIV)

The NIV mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.

     Rom. 12:4-5 must be thoroughly examined to translate Rom. 12:6-8. Rom. 12:4-5 does not describe the different gifts of the Spirit but different functions (offices) of the members of the church. Therefore, the translation of Rom. 12:6-8 must be consistent with Rom. 12:4-5. Rom. 12:4-8 describes the different functions of many members in one body of the church. The NIV translates Rom. 12:6 as, “We have different gifts, according to the grace given us. If a man’s gift is prophesying, let him prophesy in proportion to his faith.” It is thoroughly erroneous translation.
     The prophecy mentioned in Rom. 12:6 is surely only one gift of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit recorded in 1 Cor. 12:8-10. 1 Cor. 12:28-30 does not describe the gifts of the Holy Spirit but the lists of members who received the gifts of the Holy Spirit. 1 Cor. 12:28-30 does not list all the members who received the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Likewise, Rom. 12:6 does not list all the members who received the gifts of the Holy Spirit, instead, the only one member, that is, the prophet.
 
1 Cor. 14:3-5  But everyone who prophesies speaks to men for their strengthening, encouragement and comfort. He who speaks in a tongue edifies himself, but he who prophesies edifies the church. I would like every one of you to speak in tongues, but I would rather have you prophesy. He who prophesies is greater than one who speaks in tongues, unless he interprets, so that the church may be edified. (NIV)

     In 1 Cor. 14:3-5, the apostle Paul says that he who prophesies edifies the church. The prophet is one of many members in the church and his function is prophesying for the edifying of the church. The list of members in 1 Cor. 12:28-30, “apostles, workers of miracles, healers, speakers in various kinds of tongues and interpreters of tongues,” is omitted in Rom. 12:6-10. Rom. 12:6 lists only one gift of prophecy of the nine gifts of the Spirit. So the phrase, “If a man’s gift is prophesying…,” is quite erroneous translation. It must be translated, “If a man’s func- tion is prophesying, let him use it in proportion to his faith.”

The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary itself is in great confusion on Rom. 12:6-8.  

All the members do not have the same function (v. 4), but each has its respective place and work assigned it. Each member has its place and office, for the good of the whole, and of every other member. We have different gifts. According to grace, it is grace that appoints the office, qualifies and inclines the person. Seven particular gifts he specifies (v. 6-8), which seem to be meant of so many distinct offices. Prophecy. If a man’s gift is prophesying, let him use it in proportion to his faith. If a man’s gift is teaching, let him teach. Now he who has a faculty a teaching, and has undertaken that province, let him stick to it. It is a good gift. If it is encouraging, let him encourage. Let him give himself to that. This the work of the pastor, to apply gospel truths and rules more closely to the people, and to impress on them that which is more practical. If a man has the office of a deacon, let him use that office well. If it is contributing to needs of others, let him give generously. If it is leadership, let him govern diligently. If it is showing mercy, let him do it cheerfully. (The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary, p.595-596.)

     The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary should be corrected as follows because there is a mixture of right and erroneous elements.

•    All the members do not have the same function (v. 4).
              * This is right. All the members are not called the gifts of the Spirit.
•    Each has its respective place and work assigned it.
              * It is right. But each member is not called the gift of the Spirit.
•    Seven particular gifts he specifies (v. 6-8).
              * It is erroneous. It must be “Seven functions he specifies.”
•    If a man’s gift is prophesying,
              * It is erroneous. It must be “If a man’s function is prophesying,”
•    If a man’s gift is teaching,
              * It is erroneous. It must be “If a man’s function is teaching,”
•    If it is encouraging,
              * It must be “If its function is encouraging,”
•    If a man has the office of a deacon,
               * It is right. But the office of a deacon is not called a gift of the Spirit.
•    If it is contributing to needs of others,
               * It must be “If its function is contributing to needs of others,”
•    If it is leadership,
               * It must be “If its function is leadership,”
•    If it is showing mercy,
               * It must be “If its function is showing mercy,”

     The notes of the NIV Matthew Henry Commentary are illogical and unbiblical because the words, “Seven particular gifts he specifies,” are not consistent with, “If a man has the office of a deacon.” The word, “A man’s gift,” is quite distinct from “a man has the office.” Rom. 12:4-8 does by no means indicate seven gifts of the Holy Spirit but seven different functions in the church. The notes of the NIV Matthew Henry Commentary are based on the mistranslation and misinterprettation of Rom. 12:4-8 and 1 Cor. 12:28.
     If Rom. 12:4-5 is not thoroughly examined, it is impossible to understand Rom. 12:6-8. Rom. 12:4-5 says, “Just as each of us has one body with many members, and these members do not all have the same function, so in Christ we who are many form one body, and each member belongs to all the others.” This explains that many members in one body have different functions. Rom. 12:6-8 reveals seven specifications of the different functions of the members in the church. Rom. 12:6-8 does not indicate seven particular gifts but seven functions of the members in the church.

Rom. 12:6-8 must be translated as follows:

     We have different gifts, according to the grace given us. If a man’s function (office) is prophesying, let him prophesy in proportion to his faith. If his function (office) is serving, let him serve; if his function (office) is teaching, let him teach; if his function (office) is encouraging, let him encourage; if his function (office) is contributing to the need of others, let him give generously; if his function (office) is leadership, let him govern diligently; if his function (office) is showing mercy, let him do cheerfully. (Author)

The RSV mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
Having gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, let us use them: if prophecy, in proportion to faith; if service, in our serving; he who teaches, in his teaching; he who exhort, in his exhortation; he who contributes, in liberality; he who gives aid, with zeal: he who does acts of mercy, with cheerfulness.

The NRS mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.  
We have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us: prophecy, in proportion to faith; ministry, in ministering; the teacher, in teaching; the exhorter, in exhortation; the giver, in generosity; the leader, in diligence; the compassionate, in cheerfulness.

The KJV mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
Having then gifts differing according to the grace that is given to us, whether prophecy, let us prophesy according to the proportion of faith; Or ministry, let us wait on our ministering: or he that teacheth, on teaching; Or he that exhorteth, on ex- hortation: he that giveth, let him do it with simplicity; he that ruleth, with diligence; he that sheweth mercy, with cheerfulness.

The NKJ mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
Having then gifts differing according to the grace that is given to us, let us use them: if prophecy, let us prophesy in proportion to our faith; or ministry, let us use it in our ministering; he who teaches, in teaching; he who exhorts, in exhortation; he who gives, with liberality; he who leads, with diligence; he who shows mercy, with cheerfulness.
 
The NJB mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
Then since the gifts that we have differ according to the grace that was given to each of us: if it is a gift of prophecy, we should prophesy as much as our faith tells us; if it is a gift of practical service, let us use devote ourselves to serving; if it is teaching, to teaching; if it is encouraging, to encouraging. When you give, you should give generously from the heart; if you are put in the charge, you must be conscientious; if you do works of mercy, let it be because you enjoy doing them.  

The NAB mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
Since we have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, let us exercise them: if prophecy, in proportion to the faith; if ministry, in ministering; if one is a teacher, in teaching; if one exhorts, in exhortation; if one contributes, in generosity; if one is over others, diligence; if one does acts of mercy, with cheerfulness.

The LB mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
God has given each of us the ability to do certain things. So if God has given you the ability to prophesy, then prophesy whenever you can-as often as your faith is strong enough to receive a message from God. If your gift is that of serving others, serve them well. If you are a teacher, do a good job of teaching. If you are preacher, see to it that your sermons are strong and helpful. If God has given you money, be generous in helping other with it. If God has given you administrative ability and put you in charge of the work of others, take the responsibility seriously. Those who offer comfort to the sorrowing should do so with Christian cheer.

The TEV mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
So we are to use our different gifts in accordance with the grace that God has given us. If our gift is to speak God message, we should do it according to the faith that we have; if it is to serve, we should serve; if it is to teach, we should teach; if it is to encourage others, we should do so. Whoever shares with others should do it generously; whoever has authority should work hard; whoever shows kindness to others should do it cheerfully.

The AB mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
Having gifts (faculties, talents, qualities) that differ according to the grace given us, let us use them: [He whose gift is] prophesy, [let him prophesy] according to the proportion of his faith; [He whose gift is] practical service, let him give himself to serving; he who teaches, to his teaching; (He who exhorts, encourages), to his exhortation; he who contributes, let him do it in simplicity and liberality; he who gives aid and superintends, with zeal and singleness of mind; he who does acts of mercy, with genuine cheerfulness and joyful eagerness.

The NEB mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
The gifts we possess differ as they are allotted to us by God’s grace, and must be exercised accordingly: the gift of inspired utterance, for example, in proportion to a man's faith; or the gift of administration, in administration. A teacher should employ his gift in teaching, and one who has the gift of stirring speech should use it to stir his hearers. If you give to charity, give with all your heart; if you are a leader, exert yourself to lead; if you are helping others in distress, do it cheerfully.

The NLT mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
God has given each of us the ability to do certain things well. So if God has given you the ability to prophesy, speak out when you have faith that God is speaking through you. If your gift is that of serving others, serve them well. If you are a teacher, do a good job of teaching. If your gift is to encourage others, do it! If you have money, share it generously. If God has given you leadership ability, take the responsibility seriously. And if you have a gift for showing kindness to others, do it gladly.

The RWB mistakenly translates Rom. 12:6-8.
Having then gifts differing according to the grace that is given to us, whether prophecy, let us prophesy according to the proportion of faith; Or ministry, let us wait on our ministering: or he that teacheth, on teaching; Or he that exhorteth, on exhortation: he that giveth, let him do it with liberality; he that ruleth, with diligence; he that showeth mercy, with cheerfulness.

     All English versions including the CJB, CSB, ESV, GWN, MIT, NET, NIRV, NLT, and TNIV mistakenly translate Rom. 12:6-8.

Eph. 4:11-12 does not list the gifts of the Spirit but the offices of members of the church.

Eph. 4:11-12 And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; for the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ. (KJV)
NKJ      And He Himself gave some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, and some pastors and teachers, for the equipping of the saints for the work of ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ,
NIV      It was he who gave some to be apostles, some to be prophets, some to be evangelists, and some to be pastors and teachers, to prepare God’s people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up.
NEB     And these were his gifts: some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip God’s people for work in his service, to the building up of the body of Christ,
RSV     And His gifts were that some should be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ,
NRS     The gifts he gave were that some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ,
NJB      And to some, his ‘gift’ was that they should be apostles; to some prophets; to some, evangelists; to some, pastors and teachers; to knit God's holy people together for the work of service to build up the Body of Christ,
NAB    And he gave some as apostles, others as prophets, others as evange- lists, others as pastors and teachers, to equip the holy ones for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ,

     The GWN, MIT, RSV, NRS, NEB, NIRV, NLT and NJB add the ‘gift’ to Eph.  4:11 even though the word is absent from the Greek text. 1 Cor. 12:4-6 does surely express, “There are different kinds of gifts, but the same Spirit. There are different kinds of service. There are different kinds of working.” The words of 1 Cor. 12:4-6 must be applied to the translation and interpretation of Eph. 4:11-12. Eph. 4:11-12 does not list the gifts of the Spirit but different kinds of service, different kinds of working, i.e., the workers of ministry for building up the body of Christ. Therefore, it is confirmed that the members of one body of the church are not the gifts of the Spirit. For instance, a car is composed of many essential parts. Likewise, a church is composed of many essential members, that is, many workers for building up the body of Christ. Apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers are not the kinds of the gifts given by the Spirit but essential members of the church.

The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary comments on Eph. 4:11-12.

The evangelists were ordained persons whom the apostles took for their companions in travel. And then there are ordinary ministers, as pastors and teachers. Some take these two names to signify one office. Others think they describe two distinct offices, and then pastors are such as are fixed at the head of particular churches; and they are frequently called bishops and elders: and the teachers were those whose work it was to instruct the people by way of exhortation. How rich is the church that has still such a variety of gifts! How kind is Christ to his church! Christ’s great end and purpose in giving gifts to men. The gifts of Christ were intended for the good of his church. All are to prepare God’s people (v. 12). (The NIV Matthew Henry Commentary, p.666.)

     This Commentary insists that pastors, teachers, bishops and elders are the gifts of Christ. But instead these are offices within the church of Christ. 1 Cor. 12:4-5 affirms that there are different kinds of gifts and services and workings. Apostle, pastors, teachers, bishops and elders are called the members to do service and work for the body of Christ.

Billy Graham comments on Eph. 4:11-12.

Paul says that the purpose of these spiritual gifts is, “for the equipping of the saints for work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ” (Eph. 4:12). In the rest of this chapter we will limit ourselves to those five gifts listed in Ephesians 4:11 (apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher); several of these are also mentioned in 1 Corinthians 12:28. (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, p.171,175.)

     Billy Graham wrongly insists that Paul says that apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers are spiritual gifts, but Billy Graham added his own word (“spiritual gifts”) to the words of Paul. Those five lists in Ephesians 4:11 are not the lists of the gifts of the Holy Spirit but of five workers in the church. Paul does not say that the purpose of these spiritual gifts is “for the equipping of the saints for work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ.” Instead, Paul says that the purpose of these members is “for the equipping of the saints for work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ.”
     Billy Graham also wrongly insists that several of the five gifts listed in Ephesians 4:11 (apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher) are also mentioned in 1 Cor. 12:28. But 1 Cor. 12:28 says, “And in the church God has appointed first of all apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then workers of miracles, also those having gifts of healing, those able to help others, administrators, and those speaking in different kinds of tongues.” 1 Cor. 12:28 does by no means speak of the gifts of the Holy Spirit but the members or workers of ministry. In 1 Cor. 12: 28 and Eph. 4: 11, the apostle Paul does not say that apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher are spiritual gifts. Billy Graham continues:

The New Testament uses the Greek word charisma (plural, charismata) to speak of the various gifts God has given by the Holy Spirit to Christians....A biblical illustration might be Apollos (Acts 18:2-28). This New Testament evangelist and Bible teacher seemed to have charisma, in its modern English sense. The apostle Paul lacked it. However, both men had definite spiritual gifts-charismata-that God had supernaturally given them. (Billy Graham, Ibid., p.167.)

     Billy Graham insists, “apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher; several of these are also mentioned in 1 Cor. 12:28. Paul says the purpose of these spiritual gifts.” Paul was indeed an apostle, an evangelist and a Bible teacher just as Billy Graham says. Paul received charismata, that is, the gifts of tongues, prophecy, healing, operation of powers, wisdom, and knowledge, etc., the various gifts God had given by the Holy Spirit to him. Billy Graham insists, “Both men (the Bible teacher Apollos and the apostle Paul) had spiritual gifts-charismata-that God had supernaturally given them.” This means that an apostle and a Bible teacher are not spiritual gifts. In the afore-mentioned he further declares that a Bible teacher and an apostle are the gifts of the Spirit. So Billy Graham is in great confusion.

H. Orton Wiley and Paul T. Culberson comment on the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

In 1 Cor. 12:4-11; Eph. 4:11; Rom. 12:6-8, the gifts of the Sprit are supernatural endowments for service, and are determined by the character of the ministry to be accomplished. They are vital to the successful achievement of the mission of the Church. Such gifts are distributed as the Spirit wills. They are related to, but distinguished from, natural gifts and abilities. Not all members of the Church are similarly endowed. There are a diversity of gifts in the Church (1 Cor. 12:29-30). These divine bestowments upon individual members determine their functions in the body of Christ (1 Cor. 12:21-25), and constitute essential factors in the spiritual progress of the Church in every age. (H. Orton Wiley and Paul T. Culbertson, Ibid., p.252.)

     H. Orton Wiley says that Eph.  4:11, Rom. 12:6-8 and 1 Cor. 12:29-30 describe the gifts of the Holy Spirit. This note is thoroughly inaccurate since it is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of those passages. The note, “They are vital to the successful achievement of the mission of the church,” is right, but it should state that “the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:8-10 are only the gifts of the Holy Spirit.” Neither Eph. 4:11 nor Rom. 12:6-8 record the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Paul was appointed an apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher.

Rom. 1:1      Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle and set apart for the gospel of God. (NIV)
1 Tim. 1:1    Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the command of God our Savior and of Christ Jesus our hope,
1 Tim. 1:12  I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has given me strength that he considered me faithful, appointing me to his service.
2 Tim. 1:11  And of this gospel I was appointed a herald and an apostle and a teacher. (NIV)

     The apostle is one of many servants of Christ Jesus. The words “apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, teacher, elder, deacon” are not the gifts of the Spirit but a list of kinds of servants of Christ Jesus and their different functions. The records of the NT surely affirm that the apostle Paul was God’s servant and received the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit. Therefore, the lists of servants are not the lists of the gifts of the Holy Spirit. If the words, “apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, teacher, elder, deacon,” are the lists of the gifts of the Spirit, it makes no sense at all. It is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of Rom. 12:4-8 and 1 Cor. 12:27-30. There is  no scriptural reference to indicate that “apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, teacher, elder, deacon” are the lists of the gifts of the Spirit.

1 Tim. 3:1-2 indicates that a bishop is not the gift of the Holy Spirit.

1 Tim. 3:1-2   This is a faithful saying: If a man desires the position of a bishop, he desires a good work. A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, temperate, sober-minded, of good behavior, hospitable, able to teach. (NKJ)

     The text surely confirms that the position of a bishop is by no means a gift of the Holy Spirit. A bishop is one of many members of the church. Likewise, the listing of “apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, teacher, elder, and deacon” does not speak of the gifts of the Spirit but of the offices and members of the church.

Acts 19:11-12 indicates that the apostle is not a gift of the Holy Spirit.

Acts 19:11-12  God did extraordinary miracles through Paul, so that even handker- chiefs and aprons that had touched him were taken to the sick, and their illnesses were cured and the evil spirits left them. (NIV)

     The text means that the apostle Paul healed the sick through the gift of healing given by the Holy Spirit. The text of Acts 19:11-12 confirms that “apostle” is not the gift of the Holy Spirit itself but a member of the body of the church to build up the body of Christ.

The translation and interpretation of 1 Peter 4:10

1 Pet. 4:10  ἕκαστος καθὼς ἔλαβεν χάρισμα εἰς ἑαυτοὺς αὐτὸ διακονοῦντες ὡς καλοὶ οἰκονόμοι ποικίλης χάριτος θεοῦ. (BNT)
NIV        Each one should use whatever gift he has received to serve others, faithfully administering God’s grace in its various forms.
KJV        As every man hath received the gift, even so minister the same one to another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God.
NKJ        As each one has received a gift, minister it to one another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God.

     1 Pet. 4:10 surely says that each one should use whatever gift he has received to serve others. A steward is not a gift of the Spirit. Each one, a steward or a servant, is only one of many members in the body of Christ. Here, a gift (charisma, χάρισμα 1 Peter 4:10) means the gift of the Holy Spirit. A member of the church is not the gift of the Holy Spirit. Each member of the church has one of many different kinds of functions for service to the body of Jesus. 1 Peter 4:10 confirms that a member of the church is distinct from the gift of the Spirit.

Acts 6 indicates that the offices of members are distinct from the gifts of the Spirit.

Acts 6:1-6  In those days when the number of disciples was increasing, the Grecian Jews among them complained against the Hebraic Jews because their widows were being overlooked in the daily distribution of food. So the Twelve gathered all the disciples together and said, “It would not be right for us to neglect the ministry of the word of God in order to wait on tables. Brothers, choose seven men from among you who are known to be full of the Spirit and wisdom. We will turn this responsibility over to them and will give our attention to prayer and the ministry of the word.” This proposal pleased the whole group. They chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Spirit; also Philip, Procorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolas from Antioch, a convert to Judaism. They presented these men to the apostles, who prayed and laid their hands on them. (NIV)

     The twelve apostles desired seven men whose business would be to wait on tables. So the apostles choose seven men from among them who were known to be full of the wisdom and faith of the Spirit.

Rom. 12:7-8   If a man’s function is serving, let him serve; if it is teaching, let him teach; if it is encouraging, let him encourage; if it is contributing to the needs of others, let him give generously; if it is leadership, let him govern diligently; if it is showing mercy, let him do it cheerfully. (Author)  

     According to Rom. 12:7-8, there are men who are servers and encouragers. The function of the seven of Acts     6:1-6 was not to preach or teach the gospel but to serve and encourage. These functions were not the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Acts 6:1-6 surely affirms that they were full of the Spirit and wisdom. As already noted, “full of the Spirit and wisdom…full of faith and of the Holy Spirit” means “full of the wisdom of the Spirit…full of the faith of the Holy Spirit.” To be full of the wisdom and faith of the Spirit is to receive the gift of wisdom and faith of the nine gifts of the Spirit. The Bible surely affirms that the function of seven men who received the gifts of the Spirit, the gifts of wisdom and faith of the Spirit, was to wait on tables. These seven members were never called the gifts of the Spirit.
     The twelve apostles of Jesus were chosen before they were baptized with/in the Holy Spirit, that is, before receiving the gifts of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. Here, the Bible confirms that the apostle is quite distinct from the gift of the Holy Spirit. Most scholars insist that the apostle is one of the gifts of the Spirit, but this is from the mistranslation and misinterpretation of 1 Cor. 12:28-30, Rom. 12:4-8 and  Eph. 4:11. The NT surely describes, “Before or after being appointed some officers, apostles, pastors and preachers, they were baptized with/in the Holy Spirit (and with/in fire), that is, filled with the power of the Holy Spirit, and they received one or more gifts of the Holy Spirit.” Nowadays, there are many members, including pastors, in the church who have by no means received the gifts of the Holy Spirit written in 1 Cor. 12:7-11.

Billy Graham insists that every believer possesses one or more gifts of the Spirit.

The Bible teaches that every redeemed person is given at least one gift by the Holy Spirit: “Now there are varieties of gifts. But to each one is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good” (1 Cor. 12:4,7). God holds us responsible for the way we use our gifts. (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, p.166.)

Merrill F. Unger insists that every believer possesses one or more gifts of the Spirit.

Scripture reveals that all believers are in the body of Christ by virtue of Spirit baptism and that all possess one or more gifts of the Spirit as a result. This, as already noted, is the clear declaration of the central passage on the baptism of the Spirit, 1 Co 12:13. (Merrill F. Unger, The Baptism & Gifts of the Holy Spirit, p.137.)

     1 Cor. 12:11 says that the Spirit gives the gifts of Spirit to each one severally, just as he determines. According to the literal interpretation of 1 Cor. 12:11, it seems “each one” refers to every Christian believer, but does it? No. According to Acts 2:1-4, the 120 disciples were already believers before Pentecost. There were many followers of Christ, including the 120 disciples, who were already believers in Jesus Christ as their Savior and Lord before Pentecost. But only the 120 believers received the gifts including the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. Therefore, “each one” in 1 Cor. 12:11 does by no means imply every believer. In Acts 8, the Samaritan believers were already believers in Jesus Christ as their Savior through the evangelist Philip’s preaching, but the Holy Spirit had not come upon any of them. None had received the gifts of the Holy Spirit after becoming believers. The Samaritan believers did not receive the gifts of the Spirit immediately after becoming Christian believers. Therefore, “each one” in 1 Cor.12:11 does not mean every believer. “Each one” in 1 Cor. 12:11 is each one who is willing to receive one or more gifts of the Spirit subsequent to conversion, i.e., subsequent to becoming a member of Christ’s body. Unger’s note, “Scripture reveals that all believers are in the body of Christ by virtue of Spirit baptism and that all possess one or more gifts of the Spirit as a result,” is unbiblical. It is from the mistranslation of the word “all” and the Greek eis in 1 Cor. 12:13. All believers are not in the body of Christ by virtue of the Spirit’s baptism but by faith in Jesus at the moment of receiving Christ. There is no scriptural reference to indicate that all believers possess one or more gifts of the Spirit.

Stanley M. Horton insists that every believer has his own gift.

Some try to distinguish between public and private gifts or between functional and official gifts. But these usually fail to recognize that every Christian has his own gift, calling, or office available to him. (Stanley M. Horton, What the Bible says about the Holy Spirit, p.262.)

     Efforts to distinguish between public and private gifts or between functional and official gifts are quite unbiblical. There are the only nine gifts of the Holy Spirit. In the note, “every Christian has his own gift, calling, or office available to him, the portion “every Christian has his own gift” is quite erroneous. It can be said that those baptized with/in the Holy Spirit (and with/in fire) have their own gift, one or more gifts of the nine gifts of the Spirit. When a Christian receives the baptism of the Spirit after conversion, he has his own gift (gifts) through the Holy Spirit.

Acts 19:4-7 indicates that every believer does not possess one or more gifts of the Spirit.

Acts 19:4-7   Paul said, “John’s baptism was a baptism of repentance. He told the people to believe in the one coming after him, that is, in Jesus.” On hearing this, they were baptized into the name of the Lord Jesus. When Paul placed his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they spoke in tongues and prophesied. There were about twelve men in all. (NIV)

     The 12 Ephesians accepted Jesus Christ through the preaching of the apostle Paul. Afterwards they were baptized with/in water by Paul in the name of the Lord Jesus, so they had become Christian believers. But they had yet to receive one or more gifts of the Spirit. Later, as Paul placed his hands on them, they received two kinds of the gifts of the Spirit, that is, the gift of tongues and prophecy of the Spirit. So “each one” in 1 Cor. 12:11 does not mean every believer. Here, “each one” means only every believer who will receive one or more the gifts of the Spirit after becoming Christian. The 12 Ephesian believers were Christian believers by Paul’s preaching, even though they had not yet received the gifts of the Spirit through the laying on of the apostle Paul’s hands. The Bible does not indicate that every believer possesses one or more gifts of the Spirit.

Rom. 1:7-12 indicates that every believer does not possess one or more gifts of the Spirit.

Rom 1:11     ἐπιποθῶ γὰρ ἰδεῖν ὑμᾶς, ἵνα τι μεταδῶ χάρισμα ὑμῖν πνευματικὸν εἰς τὸ στηριχθῆναι ὑμᾶς, ( BNT)
Rom. 1:7-12  To all in Rome who are loved by God and called to be saints: Grace and peace to you from God our Father and from the Lord Jesus Christ. First, I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you, because your faith is being reported all over the world. God, whom I serve with my whole heart in preaching the gospel of his Son, is my witness how constantly I remember you in my prayers at all times; and I pray that now at last by God’s will the way may be opened for me to come to you. I long to see you so that I may impart to you some spiritual gift to make you strong, that is, that you and I may be mutually encouraged by each other’s faith. (NIV)

     The apostle Paul wrote a letter to Roman Christians. They had already accepted Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. They were already Christian believers before meeting Paul. Here, Paul said, “I long to see you so that I may impart to you some spiritual gift to make you strong.” Here, the word “some spiritual gift” (ti charisma pneumatikon, τι χάρισμα πνευματικὸν) refers to the gifts of the Spirit, for instance, the gift of tongues and prophecy, which were received by the 12 Ephesian believers when Paul placed his hands on them. It should be inferred that the Christian believers in Rome had not yet received the gifts of the Spirit. The apostle Paul confirms here that believers who have already accepted Jesus Christ do by no means possess one or more gifts of the Spirit.

Luke 11:11-13 indicates every believer does not possess one or more gifts of the Spirit.

Luke 11:11-13  Which of you fathers, if your son asks for a fish, will give him a snake instead? Or if he asks for an egg, will give him a scorpion? If you then, though you are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him! (NIV)

     The phrase, “How much more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him,” should be translated and inferred, “How much more will your Father in heaven give the gifts (domata  δόματα) of Holy Spirit to those who ask him,” as noted already. Here, the Greek domata (gifts) are synonymous with the Greek charismata (χάρισματα gifts) in 1 Cor. 12:9. Luke 11:11 says, “Which of you fathers, if your son asks for a fish, will give him a snake instead?” Consider the father and son. If a son asks for a fish, his father will give him a fish. Likewise, if believers ask for the gifts of the Holy Spirit, our Father in heaven will give the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Luke 11:11-13 confirms that all believers who have already accepted Jesus Christ (the children of God) do not possess one or more gifts of the Spirit. The Scripture surely confirms that the argument “every believer possesses one or more gifts of the Spirit” is quite erroneous.  

Eph. 4:7-8  Ἑνὶ δὲ ἑκάστῳ ἡμῶν ἐδόθη ἡ χάρις κατὰ τὸ μέτρον τῆς δωρεᾶς τοῦ Χριστοῦ. ἀναβὰς εἰς ὕψος ᾐχμαλώτευσεν αἰχμαλωσίαν, ἔδωκεν δόματα τοῖς ἀνθρώποις. (BNT)
NKJ   But to each one of us grace was given according to the measure of Christ’s gift. Therefore He says: “When He ascended on high, He led captivity captive, and gave gifts to men.”
    
     The Greek doreas (δωρεᾶς, gift) in Eph. 4:7 is used of the synonym of domata (δόματα, plural) in v.8. The phrase, “When He ascended on high, He led captivity captive, and gave gifts to men,” means that when Jesus ascended on high, he gave the gifts of the Spirit to men. Before Pentecost the 120 disciples had already been believers but had not yet received the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Nowhere in the Bible do we find that every believer possesses one or more gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The book of Acts confirms that the power of the Spirit is composed of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Acts 1:5,8   For John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you. (NIV)
Acts 2:3-4  They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them. (NIV)

     The texts in Acts 1:5,8 and 2:3-4 can be translated and interpreted as follows:

•    You will be baptized with/in the Holy Spirit (and with/in fire).
•    You will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you.
•    You will receive the power of the Holy Spirit when He comes on you.
•    You will be filled with the power when the Holy Spirit comes on you.
•    You will be filled with the power of the Spirit when He comes on you.
•    They were filled with the power of the Holy Spirit.
•    They began to speak in other tongues.
•    They received the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit.
•    They were baptized with/in the Holy Spirit (and with/in fire).
•    They received the power of the Holy Spirit.
•    They received the gift of the Holy Spirit.   

     Through these explanations the doctrine of the Holy Spirit can be established: “to receive the power of the Holy Spirit is to receive the gift/gifts of the Holy Spirit, and to be filled with the power of the Holy Spirit is to receive the gift/gifts of the Holy Spirit. The power of the Holy Spirit is composed of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit.” How can the power of the Holy Spirit be composed of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit? The case of the apostle Peter who received the power of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost will answer to this question.
 

Peter received the power of the Spirit, i.e., the gifts of the Spirit on the day of Pentecost.

•    Peter was filled with the power of the Spirit. (Acts 1:8; 2:4)
•    Peter received the power of the Spirit. (Acts 1:8; 2:4)
•    Peter received the gift of tongues of the Spirit. (Acts 2:4)
•    Peter received the gift of wisdom, knowledge of the Spirit. (Acts 2:14-40)
•    Peter received the gift of miraculous powers of the Spirit. (Acts 2:43; 5:12)
•    Peter received the gift of healing of the Spirit. (Acts 3:3-8)
•    Peter received the gift of faith of the Spirit. (Acts 4:1-14)
•    Peter received the gift of prophecy of the Spirit. (Acts 5:1-11)

     These records confirm the following doctrine of the Holy Spirit as biblical truth. The apostle Peter received the power of the Holy Spirit, that is, the gifts of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. This confirms that the power of the Spirit is composed of the nine gifts of the Spirit. The apostle Peter preached the gospel with the power of the Spirit, that is, with the gifts of the Spirit. To be baptized with/in the Holy Spirit (and with/in fire. See Luke 3:16 and Acts 1:5) is to receive the power of the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:8). To receive the power of the Holy Spirit is to receive the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:7-11. Now the doctrine of the Holy Spirit can be constructed: to be baptized of the Holy Spirit is to receive the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Stanley M. Horton comments on the relation between the gifts and power of the Spirit.

The baptism in the Holy Spirit leads a life of service where the gifts of the Spirit provide power and wisdom for the spread of the gospel and the growth of the Church. (Stanley M. Horton, What the Bible says about the Holy Spirit, p.261.)

     The note, “the gifts of the Spirit provide power and wisdom,” seems biblical but it is derived from the misinterpretation of the power of the Holy Spirit. It should be inferred that the baptism of the Holy Spirit is to impart the power of the Holy Spirit/the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The manifestation of the invisible Spirit means the demonstration of the Spirit’s power.

1 Cor. 2:4-5   My message and my preaching were not with wise and persuasive words, but with a demonstration of the Spirit’s power, so that your faith might not rest on men’s wisdom, but on God’s power. (NIV)  
1 Cor. 12:7    Now to each one the manifestation of the Spirit is given for the common good. (NIV)

     The words “a demonstration of the Spirit’s power (a demonstration of the Spirit and of power)” in 1 Cor. 2:4 should be seen as the manifestation of the invisible Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:7. The manifestation of the Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:7 refers to the manifestation of the nine gifts of the Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:8-11. The invisible Holy Spirit Himself is manifested by His power, that is, by the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit. It can be said that we can see the invisible Holy Spirit through the manifestation or the work of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The translation and interpretation of Acts 2:38

Acts 2:38   λήμψεσθε τὴν δωρεὰν τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος. (BNT)  
NIV        You will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. (Most English versions)
BBE       You will have the Holy Spirit given to you.
GWN     You will receive the Holy Spirit as a gift.
MIT       You will receive the holy spirit as a gift.

Robert Hanna comments on Acts 2:38.

τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος (Acts 2:38) is used as an appositional genitive with τὴν δωρεὰν meaning “the gift, which is the Spirit.” (Robert Hanna, A Grammatical Aid to the Greek New Testament, Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1983, p.119.)
 
     The note is thoroughly inaccurate since it is from the misunderstanding of Greek grammar. The Greek lempsesthe (λήμψεσθε) in Acts 2:38 requires an accusative noun. The accusative noun ten dorean (τὴν δωρεὰν) means ‘the gift.’ But tou hagiou pneumatos (τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος) meaning, ‘of the Holy Spirit’ is used as a genitive noun. Here, tu hagiu pneumatos is by no means used as an appositional genitive with the meaning “the gift, which is the Spirit.” The note “ten dorean (τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος) meaning ‘the gift, which is the Spirit’” makes no sense at all. So the phrase, “You will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit” should not be inferred to mean, “You will receive the Holy Spirit as the gift,” or “You will receive the gift, which is the Holy Spirit.” The BBE, GWN, and MIT mistakenly translate it. It must be, “You will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit,” just as the Greek text says. τὴν δωρεὰν τοῦ θεοῦ  (Act 8:20 BNT)
     The phrase, “You will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit,” must be consistent with the meaning of Acts 1:8 and 2:4. So the gift of the Holy Spirit in Acts 2:38 refers to “the power of the Holy Spirit” (Acts 1:8) and “the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit” (Acts 2:4). Acts 8:19-20 confirms that the power (authority) is the gift of God (ten dorean tou theou, τὴν δωρεὰν τοῦ θεοῦ), which means the gift of the Holy Spirit.  

Eph. 3:7 shows the usage of an appositional genitive.

Eph. 3:7  οὗ ἐγενήθην διάκονος κατὰ τὴν δωρεὰν τῆς χάριτος τοῦ θεοῦ τῆς δοθείσης μοι κατὰ τὴν ἐνέργειαν τῆς δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ.(BNT)
KJV      Whereof I was made a minister, according to the gift of the grace of God given unto me by the effectual working of his power.
NKJ      of which I became a minister according to the gift of the grace of God given to me by the effective working of His power.
NIV       I became a servant of this gospel by the gift of God’s grace given me through the working of his power.
NAB     Of this I became a minister by the gift of God’s grace that was granted me in accord with the exercise of his power.
NAS      of which I was made a minister, according to the gift of God’s grace which was given to me according to the working of His power.
NJB       I have been made the servant of that gospel by a gift of grace from God who gave it to me by the workings of his power.

     In “ten dorean tes charitos tou theou (τὴν δωρεὰν τῆς χάριτος τοῦ θεοῦ, the gift of the grace of God), tes charitos tou theou (of the grace of God) is used as an appositional genitive with ten dorean (τὴν δωρεὰν) meaning “the gift,” that is, the gift is the grace of God, the grace of God is the gift. But tou hagiou pneumatos in Acts 2:38 is by no means used as an appositional genitive with ten dorean meaning “the gift, which is the Spirit,” that is, the gift is not the Spirit.
     The 120 disciples received the gift of the tongues of the Spirit on the day of Pentecost. In the case “the gift of the tongues of the Spirit,” “the tongues” is an appositional genitive with “the gift,” that is, the gift is the speaking in unlearned tongues. The translation of the BBE, “You will have the Holy Spirit given to you” (Acts 2:38), is from the mistranslation. It must be, “You will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit” just as the Greek text says. It is affirmed that the interpretation “You will receive the Holy Spirit as the gift” is from the misunderstanding of Greek grammar.

John 4:10 does not show the usage of an appositional genitive.

John 4:7-10  When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus said, “Will you give me a drink?” (His disciples had gone into the town to buy food.) The Samaritan woman said to him, “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” (For Jews do not associate with Samaritans). Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.” (NIV)

John 4:10  εἰ ᾔδεις τὴν δωρεὰν τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ τίς ἐστιν ὁ λέγων σοι· δός μοι πεῖν, σὺ ἂν ᾔτησας αὐτὸν καὶ ἔδωκεν ἄν σοι ὕδωρ ζῶν. (BNT)
NIV     If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.

     The Greek accusative edeis (ᾔδεις oida οιδα know) requires an accusative noun dorean (δωρεὰν gift). Here, theou (θεοῦ) is used as a genitive noun. But theou is by no means used as an appositional genitive with ten dorean (τὴν δωρεὰ). To argue that theou (θεοῦ) in John 4:10 is used as an appositional genitive noun makes no sense. John 4:7-10 explains that the gift of God (ten dorean tou theouτὴν δωρεὰν τοῦ θεοῦ) is not God but living water given by Him. John 4:10 can be inferred to mean that if one asks Jesus, he will be given the gift of God that is living water. One will receive the gift of God, that is, living water. In this case, to say “one will receive God as the gift” is quite illogical and unbiblical. The gift of the Spirit (ten dorean tou hagiou pneumatos in Acts 2:38 is the same as the gift of God (ten dorean tou theou τὴν δωρεὰν τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος) in John 4:10. Robert Hanna’s claim, “tou hagiou pneumatos (τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος) in Acts 2:38 is used as an appositional genitive with ten dorean (τὴν δωρεὰν) meaning ‘the gift, which is the Spirit,’” is affirmed that it is based upon the misunderstanding of Greek grammar.  

Acts 2:32-37 indicates the meaning of the gift of the Holy Spirit in Acts 2:38.

Acts 2:32-38  God has raised this Jesus to life, and we are all witnesses of the fact. Exalted to the right hand of God, he has received from the Father the promised Holy Spirit and has poured out what you now see and hear. For David did not ascend to heaven, and yet he said, “The Lord said to my Lord: Sit at my right hand until I make your enemies a footstool for your feet. Therefore let all Israel be assured of this: God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Christ.” When the people heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and the other apostles, “Brothers, what shall we do?” Peter replied, “Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins. And you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” (NIV)
Acts 2:33   Exalted to the right hand of God, he has received from the Father the promised Holy Spirit and has poured out what you now see and hear. (NIV)
KJV           Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.
NKJ           being exalted to the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, He poured out this which you now see and hear.

     The translation of Acts 2:33 of the NIV is wrong, but that of the KJV and NKJ is correct. The phrase, “Jesus has received from the Father the promised of the Holy Spirit and has poured out what you now see and hear” in Acts 2:33, should be examined to understand Acts 2:38. The phrase, “what you now see and hear,” means that the 120 disciples spoke in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them on the day of Pentecost; that is, they received the gift of tongues by the Holy Spirit. So the phrase, “Jesus has poured out what you now see and hear,” means that Jesus has poured out the gift of the tongues by the Holy Spirit. So Acts 2:38 means that if the people in Jerusalem heard Peter’s preaching, and repented their sins and were baptized with/in water in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of their sins, they would receive the gift of the Holy Spirit, that is, the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit just as the 120 disciples did. All these facts confirm that “the gift of the Spirit” in Acts 2:38 is not the Spirit but the gift of tongues of the Spirit.

The Zondervan NIV Bible Commentary comments on Acts 2:38.

We must distinguish between “the gift” (Acts 2:38) of the Holy Spirit and what Paul called “the gifts” of that selfsame Spirit. “The gift” is the Spirit himself given to minister the saving benefits of Christ’s redemption to the believer, while “the gifts” are those spiritual abilities the Spirit gives variously to believers “for common good” and sovereignly, “just as he determines” (1 Cor 12:7,11). Peter’s promise of ‘the gift of the Holy Spirit’ is a logical outcome of repentance and baptism. (The Zondervan NIV Bible Commentary, Vol. 2, New Testament, p.394.)

     The note “The gift is the Spirit himself given to minister…” is quite inaccurate. It is based upon the misunderstanding of Acts 2:38.

The Wycliffe Bible Commentary comments on Acts 2:38.

On the day of Pentecost, Peter had exhorted his hearers to repent, to be baptized for the forgiveness of sins, and to receive the Holy Spirit (2:38). (Edited by Everett F. Harrison, The Wycliffe Bible Commentary, p.1143.)

J. Rodman Williams comments on Acts 2:38.

The gift of the Holy Spirit is the gift of God’s own presence. It is not something the Holy Spirit grants–such as life, power, wisdom–but it is the Spirit himself who is given. Since the Holy Spirit is God in His essential being, the reception of this gift means the reception of God himself. (J. Rodman Williams, The Gift of the Holy Spirit, p.123.)

Frederick D. Bruner comments on Acts 2:38.

The baptism in the name of Jesus Christ, according to Luke’s account, includes both the forgiveness of sins and the reception of the gift of the Holy Spirit (2:38b)–together. The baptism is, in the careful formation, “for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. To whomever he calls he gives his Spirit as gift (and you shall receive the gift [dorean] of the Holy Spirit). It is not insignificant, therefore, that Luke (Peter) selects the word dorea in describing the standard impar- tation of the Holy Spirit. According to this important text, Acts 2:38, we must stress in summary that incorporation into Christ grants the Spirit. The Holy Spirit is received with forgiveness of sins (Acts 2:38). (Frederick D. Bruner, A Theology of the Holy Spirit, p.167,168-9,216.)

John R. W. Stott comments on Acts 2:38.

This is the difference between ‘the gift of the Spirit’ (meaning the Holy Spirit him- self) and ‘the gifts of the Spirit’ (meaning the spiritual gifts which he distributes). The gift of the Spirit means the Holy Spirit himself. (John R. W. Stott, Baptism & Fullness, p.39.)

Stanley M. Horton comments on Acts 2:38.

He recognized the Spirit as God’s gift, the key to all God has for us (Matthew 7:7-11; Luke 11:9-13). The means and power for service come through the gifts of the Spirit. But the gifts of the Spirit need to be distinguished from the gift of the Spirit. (Stanley M. Horton, What the Bible says about the Holy Spirit, p.103,258.)

Harry N. Wendt comments on Acts 2:38.

It is helpful to compare Matthew 7:11 with Luke 11:13. The “good things” referred to in Matthew are interpreted as “the Holy Spirit” in Luke. (Harry N. Wendt, Ibid., 137.)

Eduard Schweizer comments on Acts 2:38.

“How much more will your Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask him?” (Matt 7:11). Luke changes this to “give the Holy Spirit,” because for him the Holy Spirit is the very gift of God to his church, the one good thing which God gives. The Spirit is given to all believers...Thus we read in Acts 5:32 that God has given the Holy Spirit to those who obey him. (Eduard Schweizer, Ibid., p.74-75.)

     All the arguments mentioned above “the Spirit is the gift” are quite erroneous.

Guy P. Duffield/N.M. Van Cleave comment on Luke 11:13.

The Holy Spirit is the most precious gift that our Father in heaven can give us; which He is abundantly willing to impart. (Guy P. Duffield//N.M. Van Cleave, Foundations of Pentecostal Theology, p.111.)

     This note is quite erroneous since it is based upon the misinterpretation of Luke 11:13. If it is said, “He is abundantly willing to impart the gift,” it makes sense. The note “He is abundantly willing to impart the Holy Spirit” does not make sense. It should be “He is abundantly willing to impart the gift/gifts of the Holy Spirit.”
 

John F. Walvoord insists that the Holy Spirit is a gift.

The Holy Spirit is referred to in many instances as a “gift” (John 7:37-39; Acts 11:17; Rom. 5:5; 1 Cor. 2:12; 2 Cor. 5:5). (John F. Walvoord, The Holy Spirit, p.152.)

     The note is quite unbiblical. None of these passages speaks of the Spirit as a gift.

H. Orton Wiley and Paul T. Culberson insist that the Holy Spirit is both Gift and Giver.

No man can say that Jesus is the Lord but by the Holy Spirit (1 Cor 12:3). The work of the Holy Spirit as the Third Person of the Trinity is in connection with His offices as the Representative of the Savior. Pentecost was the inauguration day of Holy Spirit, and the Pentecostal Gift was the gift of a Person-the Paraclete or Comforter. The Holy Spirit is both Gift and Giver. He is the Gift of the glorified Christ to the Church. (H. Orton Wiley and Paul T. Culbertson, Ibid., p.249-251. )

     Wiley correctly treats the Holy Spirit as the third Person of the Trinity. But the note, “Pentecost was the inauguration day of Holy Spirit,” is quite erroneous. The Pentecostal gift was not the Holy Spirit but the power of the Holy Spirit. The note, “The Holy Spirit is both Gift and Giver,” also quite erroneous because the Holy Spirit is not Gift but God the Spirit and Giver. He is the Giver of the power and of nine gifts to the disciples of Jesus for preaching and service. The note, “He is the Gift of the glorified Christ to the Church,” is quite erroneous. He is not the Gift but the Giver of power and nine gifts. Wiley’s statement is based on this misunderstanding.    

Chuck Smith comments on Acts 10:45.

In Acts 10, the Jews who came with Peter were surprised that the gift of the Holy Spirit was poured out upon the Gentiles.(Chuck Smith, Living Water, p.265.)

     If the phrase (“the gift of the Holy Spirit was poured out upon the Gentiles” in Acts 10) is thoroughly examined, the meaning of “the gift of the Holy Spirit” in Acts 2:38 can be understood because Acts 10:44-47 indicates the meaning of the gift of the Holy Spirit in Acts 2:38.

Acts 10:44-47 While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit came on all who heard the message. The circumcised believers who had come with Peter were astonished that the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out even on the Gentiles. For they heard them speaking in tongues and praising God. Then Peter said, “Can anyone keep these people from being baptized with water? They have received the Holy Spirit just as we have.” (NIV)

     The phrase, “the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out even on the Gentiles. For they heard them speaking in tongues and praising God,” can be summarized, “the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit had been poured out even on the Gentiles, that is, the Gentiles received the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit.” The text confirms that the gift of the Holy Spirit is not the Holy Spirit but the gift of tongues of the Holy Spirit. Here, Acts 10:44-47 indicates the meaning of “the gift of the Holy Spirit” in Acts 2:38. The phrase, “They have received the Holy Spirit just as we have,” in Acts 10:47 is from the mistranslation of the Greek verb lambano. It should be, “They have been filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit just as we have,” as noted already. Chuck Smith continues:

In Acts 9, the Holy Spirit was imparted to Paul by Ananias. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.265.)

     The note is quite erroneous since it is based on the mistranslation of Acts 9:17, which says, “Then Ananias went to the house and entered it. Placing his hands on Saul, he said, ‘Brother Saul, the Lord-Jesus, who appeared to you on the road as you were coming here-has sent me so that you may see again and be filled with the Holy Spirit’”(NIV). According to the literal phrase “be filled with the Holy Spirit,” Chuck Smith insists that the Holy Spirit was imparted to Paul by Ananias. It seems to be biblical, but it is thoroughly unbiblical. The phrase “be filled with the Holy Spirit” must be translated, “be filled with (the power) of the Holy Spirit.” Now, it should be said that the power of the Holy Spirit was imparted to Paul by the laying on of Ananias’ hands, or that Paul was filled with the power of the Holy Spirit by Ananias. Chuck Smith continues:

In Galatians 3:2, Paul wrote, “Did you receive the Spirit by the works of the law, or by the hearing of faith?”…when they heard the word of God they believed it, and so received the gift. We are to receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.271,273.)

     Chuck Smith insists here that to receive the Holy Spirit is to receive the gift of the Holy Spirit, and the Holy Spirit is a gift. This is thoroughly unbiblical since it is based on the mistranslation of the Greek verb lambano in Gal. 3:2. Chuck Smith continues:

The Holy Spirit is a gift that must be received. Jesus said to His disciples, “Receive the Holy Spirit.” The apostle John said that those who believed on Jesus should “receive” the Spirit. When Peter and John went to Samaria to greet the new believers there, they prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit. (Chuck Smith, Ibid., p.275-6.)

     The note, “The Holy Spirit is a gift that must be received,” is quite erroneous since it is from the mistranslation of the Greek verb lambano in John 20:22, Acts 8:14-19 and Gal. 3:2. The note, “The apostle John said that those who believed on Jesus should receive the Spirit,” should read, “The apostle John said that those who believed on Jesus should be filled with the power of the Spirit.”

Daniel B. Wallace comments on “interrogative pronoun” in Luke 11:13.  

An interrogative pronoun asks a question. πόσος (27 times) asks a quantitative question (“How much?”). πόσος is normally qualitative and quantitative interrogative pronounces respectively. (Daniel B. Wallace, Greek Grammar beyond the Basics, p.345-6.)

Matt. 15:34   πόσους ἄρτους ἔχετε (BNT)
                     How many (πόσος) loaves do you have? (NIV)
Matt. 7:11    If you, then, though you are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much (πόσος) more will your Father in heaven give good gifts to those who ask him! (NIV)

Luke 16:7     σὺ πόσον ὀφείλεις (BNT)
                     How much (πόσους) do you owe? (NIV)
Luke 11:13   If you then, though you are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much (πόσος) more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him! (Italics and the Greek added)  

     In the case of  Matt. 7:11, 15:34 and Luke 16:7, the Greek grammar of “interrogative pronoun posos (πόσος) noted by Wallace can be applied to “loaves and good gifts” since both are qualitative and quantitative nouns, that is, material nouns. But this grammar can by no means be applied to Luke 11:13. The Holy Spirit is not qualitative and quantitative noun but a proper noun just like Jesus, as already noted. The phrase, “How much (posos πόσος) more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!”(All English versions), makes no sense at all. Can it be said, “How much (posos πόσος) more will your Father in heaven give Jesus Christ to those who ask him!”? It really makes no sense. But if it were translated, “How much (posos πόσος) more will your Father in heaven give the good gifts of the Holy Spirit to those who ask him?” it makes good sense because the Holy Spirit is regarded as a proper name. Many scholars mistakenly insist that the Holy Spirit is a “gift” in Matt. 7:11 and Luke 11:13.

Frederick D. Bruner identifies the gift in Acts 8:20 with the Spirit.

The relevance of the Simon Magus passage to our theme is this: The Spirit is, in the language of Acts 8:20, the (ten) gift–the gift (dorean)–of God (tou theou). (Frederick d. Bruner, A Theology of the Holy Spirit, p.183.)

     The comment, “The Spirit is, in the language of Acts 8:20, the gift of God,” is quite unbiblical since it is from the mistranslation and the misinterpretation of Acts 8:18-21. Let’s read these passages.

Acts 8:18-21  And when Simon saw that through the laying on of the apostles’ hands the Holy Spirit was given, he offered them money, saying, “Give me this power also, that anyone on whom I lay hands may receive the Holy Spirit.” But Peter said to him, “Your money perish with you, because you thought that the gift of God could be purchased with money! You have neither part nor portion in this matter, for your heart is not right in the sight of God. (NKJ)

     The phrase, “Give me this power also, that anyone on whom I lay hands may receive the Holy Spirit,” must be translated, “Give me this power also, that anyone on whom I lay hands may be filled with the power of the Holy Spirit. “This power” does not mean the Holy Spirit. The phrase, “through the laying on of the apostles’ hands the Spirit was given,” should be inferred to mean that through the power given to Peter by God, that is, by the gift of God, Peter laid his hands on them, and they were filled with the power of the Spirit. That is, “through the laying on of the apostles’ hands the power of the Spirit was given to them.” Here, it is confirmed that the Spirit is not the gift of God. The power given to Peter by God is the gift of God. Simon wanted to buy the power given to Peter by God. To conclude Simon wanted to buy the Spirit as the gift makes no sense at all.

Matt. 10:1-8; Luke 9:1-3 confirm that power and authority is the gift of God/the Spirit.

Luke 9:1-3   When Jesus had called the Twelve together, he gave them power and authority to drive out all demons and to cure diseases, and he sent them out to preach the kingdom of God and to heal the sick. He told them: “Take nothing for the journey–no staff, no bag, no bread, no money, no extra tunic.” (NIV)
Matt. 10:1,5-10  He called his twelve disciples to him and gave them authority to drive out evil spirits and to heal every disease and sickness. These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: “Do not go among the Gentiles or enter any town of the Samaritans. Go rather to the lost sheep of Israel. As you go, preach this message: ‘The kingdom of heaven is near.’ Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse those who have leprosy, drive out demons. Freely you have received, freely give. Do not take along any gold or silver or copper in your belts; take no bag for the journey, or extra tunic, or sandals or a staff; for the worker is worth his keep.” (NIV)

     Luke 9:1-3 carries the same meaning as Matt. 10:1-10. Jesus gave His twelve disciples power and authority to drive out all demons and to heal every disease. Jesus temporarily gave them this power and authority for the training in preaching the gospel before Pentecost, as noted already. The gifts of healing of the Holy Spirit are for the driving out of all demons and the healing of every disease and sickness. The Bible confirms that power and authority contains the gifts of healing of the Spirit. So it can be said that the power and authority is the gift of the Spirit.

Matt. 10:8 confirms that the power given by Jesus is the gift of the Holy Spirit.

Matt. 10:8   δωρεὰν ἐλάβετε, δωρεὰν δότε. (Mat 10:8 BNT)
                    Freely you have received, freely give. (NIV)                            

     In the text the Greek adverb dorean (δωρεὰν freely) is from the Greek noun dorea (δωρεὰ), which means “a gift” in Acts 2:38 and 10:45. It can be inferred that the disciples freely received a gift, so they freely gave this gift. That which believers have freely received by Jesus Christ is the power and authority. In Luke 9:1-3 and Matt.10:1,5-10 Jesus Christ gave His twelve disciples the power and authority to drive out all demons and to cure diseases.
     It can be inferred, “You freely have received the power and authority as a gift, so freely give them the gifts of healing, that is, freely heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse those who have leprosy, drive out demons.” Here, it is confirmed that the power and authority is the gift of the Spirit. It can be said that the 12 apostles had temporally received the power and authority, that is, the gifts of the healing of the Spirit before Pentecost. The apostles were not called the gift of the Spirit. They did their ministries by the gifts of the Spirit.

Frederick D. Bruner insists that the gift of the Spirit in Acts 10:45 is conversion.

The Caesarean event cannot be interpreted by means of Pentecostalism’s doctrines of either the subsequent or the conditional baptism in the Holy Spirit. The tongues came neither subsequent to conversion nor through conditions fulfilled prior their incidence. They occurred here at conversion…Of most importance, the gift of the Holy Spirit here is conversion, not a later experience. (Frederick D. Bruner, A Theology of the Holy Spirit, p.192.)

     The note “the gift of the Holy Spirit is conversion” is from a misunderstanding.
 
Acts 10:44-46  While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit fell upon all those who heard the word. And those of the circumcision who believed were astonished, as many as came with Peter, because the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on the Gentiles also. For they heard them speak with tongues and magnify God. (NKJ)

     The text says the gift of the Holy Spirit was poured out on the Gentiles when the Holy Spirit fell upon them, and they spoke with tongues. Here, the phrase “they spoke with tongues” means that they received the gift of tongues. Therefore, it is affirmed that the gift of the Holy Spirit does not mean conversion but the gift of tongues. It should be inferred that Cornelius was already converted through faith in the God of the OT before receiving the gift of tongues.

John Calvin insists that natural talents are the gifts of the Spirit.

Human competence in art and science also derives from the Spirit of God. Meanwhile, we ought not to forget those most excellent benefits of the divine Spirit, which he distributes to whomever he wills, for the common good of mankind. The understanding and knowledge of Bezalel and Oholiab, needed to construct the Tabernacle, had to be instilled in them by the Spirit of God [Ex. 31:2-11; 35:30-35]. (John Calvin, IV, 2,16.)

William Barclay insists that natural talents are the gifts of the Spirit.

The mason, carpenter, the electrician, the painter, the engineer, the plumber all have their special gifts, which are from God and can be used for him. (Williams Barclay, The letter to the Corinthians, Philadelphia: Westminster, 1975, p.109.)

Billy Graham insists that natural talents are the gifts of the Spirit.

In studying the three passages where the gifts are listed, we find a total of about twenty. In addition, the Old Testament mentions a number of gifts not listed in the New Testament. Many of these seem quite similar to natural abilities or talents people may have, although others are clearly spiritual in character. Certainly, most of us know of people who have a special gift of “music” which is not listed among these twenty. Moreover, many people wonder what the difference is between a spiritual gift and a natural talent. One may have the talent of making beautiful handcrafts; another may have a talent for music. Actually, most people have talents of one kind or another, and these too come from the Creator. It appears that God can take a talent and transform it by the power of the Holy Spirit and use it as a spiritual gift. In fact, the difference between a spiritual gift and an actual talent is frequently a cause for speculation by many people. 1 am not sure we can always draw a sharp line between spiritual gifts and natural abilities-both of which, remember, come ultimately from God. Nor do I believe it is always necessary to make a sharp distinction. On most occasions, however, in the context we are discussing, the gifts 1 have in mind are supernatural ones the Spirit gives a person for the good of the Church.
There’s an interesting passage in Exodus 31 about Bezalel. The Bible says, “And I have filled him with the Spirit of God in wisdom, in understanding, in knowledge, and in al1 kinds of craftsmanship, to make artistic designs for work in gold, in silver, and in bronze, and in the cutting of stones for settings, and in the carving of wood, that he may work in all kinds of craftsmanship” (v. 35). This indicates that many of the skills and talents that people have are gifts of God. This unique ability of Bezalel, given by the Spirit, included not only manual skill but also the intellectual wisdom and understanding essential to all art. Artistic talent of every kind is a divine gift. “Every good thing bestowed and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation, or shifting shadow” (James 1: 17). (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, p.169-171.)

Michael Green insists that natural talents are the gifts of the Spirit.

These charismata, these gifts of God’s love, begin with our creation and redemption. They include the heightening of qualities already latent within us, such as gifts of administration, leadership, teaching, marriage, music and the like. It is important to realize that these natural qualities–or acquired skills, like cooking or typing can be recognized as charismata, gracious gifts from the Lord. (Michael Green, I believe in the Holy Spirit, p.243.)

Exodus does not indicate that natural talents are the gifts of the Spirit.

Exodus 31:1-6    Then the Lord said to Moses, See, I have chosen Bezalel son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah, and I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with skill, ability and knowledge in all kinds of crafts–make artistic designs for work in gold, silver and bronze, to cut and set stones, to work in wood, and to engage in all kinds of craftsmanship. Moreover, I have appointed Oholiab son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan, to help him. Also I have given skill to all the craftsmen to make everything I have commanded you. (NIV)

Exodus 35:30-35  Then Moses said to the Israelites, See, the Lord has chosen Bezalel son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah, and he has filled him with the Spirit of God, with skill, ability and knowledge in all kinds of crafts–to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver and bronze, to cut and set stones, to work in wood and to engage in all kinds of artistic craftsmanship. And he has given both him and Oholiab son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan, the ability to teach others. He has filled them with skill to do all kinds of work as craftsmen, designers, embroiderers in blue, purple and scarlet yarn and fine linen, and weavers–all of them master craftsmen and designers. (NIV)

Exodus 36:1-2: So Bezalel, Oholiab and every skilled person to whom the Lord has given skill and ability to know how to carry out all the work of constructing the sanctuary are to do the work just as the Lord has commanded. Then Moses summoned Bezalel and Oholiab and every skilled person to whom the Lord had given ability and who was willing to come and do the work. (NIV)

     Exodus 31:3 and 35:31 say, “I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with skill, ability and knowledge.” Here, the literal words, “I have filled him with the Spirit,” make no sense at all because the Spirit is not treated as God. Therefore, it must be inferred, “I have filled him with skill, ability and knowledge given by the Spirit of God.” Then, it makes sense. 1 Cor. 12:8 records, “to each one is given the wisdom and knowledge through the Holy Spirit.” The wisdom and knowledge of the Holy Spirit refer to the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Here, Exodus 31:3 means that by the Spirit God filled him with gifts of skill, ability and knowledge. God appointed Bezalel who believed in God to be a craftsman. He gave him the gifts of the Holy Spirit to do the works of a craftsman. Here, the Bible confirms that a craftsman is not the gift of the Holy Spirit. The skill, ability and knowledge mentioned in Exodus 31:3 and 35:31 go beyond natural skill, natural ability and natural knowledge learned or inherited by their parents. These gifts given to Bezalel and Oholiab were gifts given by the Holy Spirit. Natural knowledge is absolutely distinct from the knowledge given by the Holy Spirit written in 1 Cor. 12:8.
     In the notes mentioned above, John Calvin, William Barclay, Michael Green and Billy Graham insist that the skills and talents that people have are gifts of God. This claim is quite unbiblical. Many unbelievers who have skills and talents do not accept Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. Every kind of natural skills and talents is resident in all types of people. Therefore, to say that every kind of “artistic talent is a divine gift” makes no sense at all. Every kind of natural artistic talent of people cannot be called a divine gift of the Spirit. It is inherited by their parents. The supernatural artistic talents given by the Spirit to Bezalel and Oholiab were quite distinct from unbeliever’s natural artistic talents inherited by their parents.

A carpenter must have different types of tools. Likewise, Jesus' servant must have different types of tools, namely, the gifts of the Spirit.

Billy Graham says, “A gift might also be called a tool or an instrument that is to be used, rather than a piece of Jewelry for decoration, or a box of candy for personal enjoyment. We could think of the different types of tools a carpenter uses, or the different types of tools a surgeon needs. These ‘tools’ have been given to people for use in the functioning of the Body of Christ.” (Billy Graham, The Holy Spirit, p.170.)

     This statement is right. Neither the carpenter nor the surgeon is a tool. The tools are quite distinct from the workers who use them. Likewise, the gifts of the Holy Spirit are quite distinct from the servants of Jesus including apostles, pastors, and teachers. But Billy Graham says, “In the rest of this chapter we will limit ourselves to those five gifts listed in Ephesians 4:11 (apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher); several of these are also mentioned in 1 Corinthians 12:28. Paul says that the purpose of these spiritual gifts is, for the equipping of the saints for work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ (Eph. 4:12).” (Billy Graham, Ibid., p.175,171)

     The reference to Eph. 4:11 mentioned by Billy Graham makes no sense at all. The apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher are not the gifts of the Spirit but servants of Christ. They are workers like carpenters or surgeons who have the different types of tools for work of service to build up the body of Christ. Billy Graham says, “These tools have been given to people for use in the functioning of the Body of Christ.” Billy Graham correctly insists here that “people” are not “tools.” The gifts of the Holy Spirit might be called tools or instruments. The gifts of the Holy Spirit are to be used by God’s spiritual carpenters and surgeons. One or more gifts in the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit have been given to all the workers, apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers for the Body of Christ. The Holy Spirit gives the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit to each member severally, just as He determines. Apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers recorded in Eph. 4:11 are not the gifts of the Holy Spirit but servants, members of the body of Jesus, that is, the church. The tools, that is, the nine gifts of the Spirit have been given to apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers for use in the functioning of the Body of Christ.
     To say that the gifts of apostle, evangelist, pastor, or teacher were given to Paul or anyone to use in the Body of Christ, it makes no sense at all. The gifts of the Spirit might be called tools that are to be used by a servant of Jesus. A carpenter has different types of tools to do his job. Likewise, a servant of Jesus has different types of tools, that is, different kinds of the gifts of the Spirit to do his job. The carpenter is quite distinct from the tool. A carpenter is not a tool and is not called a tool. Likewise, apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers are not tools but servants of Jesus Christ to preach the gospel. A good carpenter has different kinds of tool to do his job. Likewise, every servant of Christ should have different kinds of tools, that is, different kinds of the gifts of the Spirit to do his job.

All believers are called Jesus’ soldiers who have different kinds of weapons/gifts.

1 John 3:8   He who does what is sinful is of the devil, because the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the devil’s work. (NIV)  
2 Tim. 2:3-4  Endure hardship with us like a good soldier of Christ Jesus. No one serving as a soldier gets involved in civilian affairs–he wants to please his commanding officer. (NIV)

     All Christians are Jesus’ soldiers, whose struggle is against Satan. Jesus Christ can be called the commander of all believers. The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the devil’s work. The work of Jesus was to destroy the devil’s work. Likewise, the work of the disciples of Jesus is to destroy the devil’s work.

Eph. 6:11-17: Put on the full armor of God so that you can take your stand against the devil’s schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms. Therefore put on the full armor of God, so that when the day of evil comes, you may be able to stand your ground, and after you have done everything, to stand. Stand firm then, with the belt of truth buckled around your waist, with the breastplate of righteousness in place, and with your feet fitted with the readiness that comes from the gospel of peace. In addition to all this, take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. (NIV)

     All soldiers must have different kinds of weapons, shields, swords, and arrows to wage war against their enemies. Likewise, all soldiers of Jesus must have one or more gifts of the Spirit to destroy Satan’s work.  

Matt. 10:1-2   He called his twelve disciples to him and gave them authority to drive out evil spirits and to heal every disease and sickness. These are the names of the twelve apostles. (NIV)
Luke 9:1-2    When Jesus had called the Twelve together, he gave them power and authority to drive out all demons and to cure diseases, and he sent them out to preach the kingdom of God and to heal the sick. (NIV)

     The Bible indicates that the 12 apostles and the 70 disciples had the power and authority, that is, the gifts of healing and miraculous powers of the Spirit to drive out all demons and to cure diseases. All soldiers of Jesus must have one or more of the gifts of the Spirit to wage war against Satan, to destroy Satan’s work.

The service of the priesthood is a gift given by God but it is not called the gift of the Spirit.

Num. 18:7   But only you and your sons may serve as priests in connection with everything at the altar and inside the curtain. I am giving you the service of the priesthood as a gift. (NIV)

     The text says that the service of the priesthood is a gift given by God. But it is not called the gift of the Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:7-11.

The eternal life in Christ is a gift given by God but it is not called the gift of the Spirit.
 
Rom.  6:23   For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. (NIV)

     The text says the gift (charisma χάρισμα) of God is eternal life in Jesus our Lord, but eternal life in Jesus through the Spirit is not called the gift of the Spirit.

The salvation is the gift of God but it is not called the gift of the Spirit.

Eph.  2:8-9   For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith–and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God–not by works, so that no one can boast. (NIV)  

     To be saved by grace is surely the gift (doron δωρoν) of God but the salvation is not called the gift of the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:7-11.

To be happy in his work is a gift of God but it is not called the gift of the Spirit.

Eccles. 5:19   Moreover, when God gives any man wealth and possessions, and them enables him to enjoy them, to accept his lot and be happy in his work-this is a gift of God. (NIV)

     The words “to be happy in his work” are surely a gift of God but it is not called the gift of the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 12:7-11.

Harry Wendit insists that love is the gift of the Holy Spirit.

Paul describes love’s qualities, and in 1 Cor 13:8-13 stresses that love will continue throughout this life and the next. Finally, in v.13, Paul writes that faith, hope, and love continue to this very day, but the greatest of these three gifts of the Spirit is love. (Harry Wendit, cited by the Divine Drama, p.113. The original English edition of Wendit’s book was unavailable to author.)

     Gal. 5:22-23 says that love is not the gift of the Spirit but a fruit of the Spirit. Nowhere in the Scripture is love mentioned as a gift of the Spirit, which is quite distinct from the fruit of the Spirit. Also “hope” is not the gift of the Spirit.